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Grammar Central > English doesn't borrow

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message 1: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
[image error]


message 2: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Loose grammar. Anything like loose women?


message 3: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Where do you find these gems Ruth? That one was great.


message 4: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Facebook. (Sh, don't tell NE.)


message 5: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
(I didn't just see that.)


message 6: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
...and I can't see anything in #1.......what was it?


message 7: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
I see floaters... stars... motes of dust.


message 8: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Debbie wrote: "...and I can't see anything in #1.......what was it?"

It didn't load Debbie?

It says: English doesn't borrow from other languages.English follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them over and goes through their pockets for loose grammar.

Picture of a guy mugging another man , background black with blue letters.


message 9: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
No...I am at school though so watchdog may be blocking it!


message 10: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
Kitty, we are referring to some garbled, indistinguishable Message #4 here.


message 11: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Duh ! What a dunce I am. Sorry! LOL


message 12: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
No you aren't Kitty...spot on....I can only see empty space in #1


message 13: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10390 comments Whew! Glad to know I am not a dunce yet.


message 14: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
"You funny, Indy!"

-- from some Indiana Jones movie or other


message 15: by Anna-maria (new)

Anna-maria Frastali | 5 comments That's a funny picture. I don't know how true it is though. I speak 4 languages. English has the easiest grammar and seems more loose to me. Greek or German grammar... now that's strict grammar!


message 16: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18313 comments Mod
German anything. Sentences are longer than the autobahn. No wonder they lost the war -- couldn't get orders out fast enough....


message 17: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments The cartoon explains why the English-French dictionary is so much longer than the French-English one. We have stolen everybody else's words. The Inuit have 24 words for snow. We have 24 words for everything.(I exaggerate!)


message 18: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15767 comments Mod
Newengland wrote: "German anything. Sentences are longer than the autobahn. No wonder they lost the war -- couldn't get orders out fast enough...."

Heck, some German words are longer than the autobahn.


message 19: by Marcus (new)

Marcus Malone (MarcusMalone) | 1 comments I suppose this is a deviation from the spiffy image Ruth presented in #1 (thanks Ruth), but Anthony brought up something interesting in #17 that… well… I can’t resist.

To me it seems reasonable that the Inuit would have 24 words for snow. Snow comes in various forms, such as the large flakes that decorate tree branches, or the fine powdery crystals that form drifts, or the soft slurry that forms slush. Some snow packs well, other snow doesn’t. Some snow is very grainy. I suppose as the language evolved it became simpler to develop a word to each type of snow, rather than using phrases, like “fine powdery snow” or “Big heavy flakes”. After all, snow is their primary environment.

To put it in perspective, consider the following list of 24 words that describes the primary environment for most of the planet:

Dirt, sand, soil, mud, muck, clay, earth, gravel, dust, loam, quicksand, terracotta, caliche, stone, rock, shale, pebble, boulder, bedrock, sediment, sandstone, grit, pumice, outcropping.

How many Inuit words describe dirt? Does anyone know?


message 20: by Anthony (last edited Dec 24, 2011 12:28AM) (new)

Anthony Buckley (anthonydbuckley) | 112 comments Marcus wrote: "How many Inuit words describe dirt? Does anyone know? ..."

In the interests of truth, I should say I really don't know how many Inuit words describe snow. But your point is an interesting one.

It is sometimes plausibly said that the proliferation of seafaring words and phrases in English ("show a leg","give a wide berth", "pipe her aboard","splice the mainbrace", "walk the plank" etc) is due to Britain having once been a nautical nation.


message 21: by Aryn (new)

Aryn | 136 comments Ruth wrote: ""

Love this, Ruth!


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