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The Dickens Project - Archives > Oliver Twist - Week Five: Book 1, Chapters xviii-xxii

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message 1: by Loretta (new)

Loretta (lorettalucia) Eep, sorry for the delay! Post away below.


message 2: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments I really felt for and ached with Oliver in his solitude. It was the most heart- wrenching scene when he spent hours next to the door to be closer to people.


message 3: by Anne (new)

Anne | 89 comments Zulfiya wrote: "I really felt for and ached with Oliver in his solitude. It was the most heart- wrenching scene when he spent hours next to the door to be closer to people."

I felt so bad for him. The loneliness, neglect, and abuse he experiences was sometimes hard to read. It's a little too real, and all I wanted to do is rescue him. Of course, he's fictional, so that would be a little tough (I have a tendency to get a little too attached to characters). It is heartbreaking to think that there are still real children who get treated that way today.

The end of this section was so shocking, I ended up reading past it to the next section. If I wasn't reading it for this group, I probably would just finish it off this weekend, but I'm going to try and stick to the schedule.


message 4: by Zulfiya (new)

Zulfiya (ztrotter) | 1596 comments I was paging though this week's section again and noticed how beautifully and sadly Dickens describes the hassle of the market place in Chapter 21. It is as if the market place has a life of its own, and never ceases to stop.
It was market-morning. The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemd to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above. All the pens in the centre of the large area, and as many temporary pens as could be crowded into the vacant space, were filled with sheep; tied up to posts by the gutter side were long lines of beasts and oxen, three or four deep. Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low grade, were mingled together in a mass; the whistling of drovers, the barking dogs, the bellowing and plunging of the oxen, the bleating of sheep, the grunting and squeaking of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping and yelling; the hideous and discordant dim that resounded from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figues constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng; rendered it a stunning and bewildering scene, which quite confounded the senses.
Granted, this description still reflects the mood Oliver was in and bears a certain feeling of foreshadowing, but, nonetheless, it is an apt observation and a precise grasp of market vitality, though a shadowy one.


message 5: by Loretta (new)

Loretta (lorettalucia) Zulfiya wrote: "I was paging though this week's section again and noticed how beautifully and sadly Dickens describes the hassle of the market place in Chapter 21. It is as if the market place has a life of its ow..."

I was really struck by this section too.


message 6: by Julia (new)

Julia (jujulia) | 1 comments Zulfiya wrote: "I was paging though this week's section again and noticed how beautifully and sadly Dickens describes the hassle of the market place in Chapter 21. It is as if the market place has a life of its ow..."

Wow, thanks for posting this - I wanted to join in on the read, but didn't find the leisure due to some personal mishaps (well, the delay in planned reading wasn't the worst...)., but this section is definitely great literature. I hope I'll be able to read along wiht you guys later


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