Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone discussion


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Why are there so little teachers at hogwarts?

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message 1: by Icantreadwhyamihere (last edited Nov 06, 2011 10:51PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Icantreadwhyamihere Seriously consider it for a second: there are at least over 400 students at hogwarts, which is about the same amount as my school. So why is there only 1 teacher per subject? lol how does 7 different year groups manage to attend 4 to 6 classes a day? do all the teachers have time turners? lol yeah im a troll


Icantreadwhyamihere oh yeah and also, while im complaining, the barrier to platform 9 3/4......explanation? does it teleport them somewhere or what?


Lex is da name, dont wear it out what do you mean teleport them somewhere??


Icantreadwhyamihere well how else do they end up at a totally different train station?


Mark Magic.


message 6: by Kim (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kim Im pretty sure there are other teachers who we don't hear about. I mean in my school there were 2,200 kids and I saw a handful of teachers around. However there were about 60 other teachers I never seen before. Weird.

It'd be too much work to put all those teachers in the book. Either that orrrr maybe they all use time transporters.


Nikki Not all the students take all the classes every year. Hermoine takes classes that Harry and Ron never take. Those teachers are not main characters but they are at the school. Some classes are not every day of the week. Potions on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Herbology on Wednesdays. Arithmancy on Fridays. That sort of thing. Like college. You don't have it all everyday. Some classes you don't start until later on. Some classes you only take for your first few years.


Jessica I think you make a good point Kim- Rowling's books are long enough and stocked with enough characters that we don't need to know about ALL the teachers. And I'm pretty positive that in their later years, the students don't go to the same class every day which would allow for rotation?

I never really thought about it before...

As for platform 9 3/4, i think that the wall is almost like a portkey of sorts that transports them to a different station.


Larry Moniz It's fiction.


message 10: by Will (new) - rated it 3 stars

Will IV Larry wrote: "It's fiction."


Valerie I guess not a lot of teachers are needed. Also, not a lot of people can be trusted. At least not by Dumbledore anyways. You might just have to ask JK Rowling herself for the exact answer. A lot of teacher might be confusing too.


Gabriel That is a good question. There are over one hundred students at Hogwarts, so you would think that there were at least two dozen teachers.


message 13: by Kim (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kim Jessica wrote: "I think you make a good point Kim- Rowling's books are long enough and stocked with enough characters that we don't need to know about ALL the teachers. And I'm pretty positive that in their later ..."

Thank you :)

I do agree with your point on platform 9 3/4. I never thought of it as a portkey, but that does make sense.


message 14: by Hina (new) - rated it 5 stars

Hina I think there was definitely one teacher per subject at Hogwarts, but they were still enough even though there were seven year groups.

Since students are allowed to drop/pick subjects as they get higher up, their subjects are fit accordingly on their timetables. Also, there are probably less witches and wizards at Hogwarts than in regular high schools, well there are more in my high school.


Carli Nikki wrote: "Not all the students take all the classes every year. Hermoine takes classes that Harry and Ron never take. Those teachers are not main characters but they are at the school. Some classes are not ..."

true


Badgerlord I agree with Kim. The books only bother with Harry and co.'s teachers. There's tons of students in my school, but I barely recognise any of them.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

you can't have too much characters in a book. it'll be hard to remember which is which


Rachel Nikki wrote: "Not all the students take all the classes every year. Hermoine takes classes that Harry and Ron never take. Those teachers are not main characters but they are at the school. Some classes are not ..."

^That. There are only about 300 students at Hogwarts, and they double up on lessons (1st year Gryffindors and Slytherins have Potions at the same time, for example.) Each professor has multiple classes a day, maybe one in the morning, one at noon, and one in the afternoon, so there are plenty of time slots throughout the week. Enough for both students and teachers to have free periods. And not everyone takes every class, etc. etc.


Rachel So actually, if you double up the lessons, you have 14 or 15 groups of 20 students. There are 13 classes at Hogwarts, including Flying lessons, so that's enough to put almost all of the groups into a class at the same time, with one or two groups having a free period. Seems like plenty of professors to me.


message 20: by Will (new) - rated it 3 stars

Will IV I haven't read past the first 2 books, does anyone know if they mention how the students obtain their education in other fields besides magic?


Vanessa Mark wrote: "Magic."

hahaha! i like your answer Mark! :)))


Jessica Will, can you explain what you mean by other fields? Are you talking about job out in the "muggle world" like accounting?


message 23: by Will (new) - rated it 3 stars

Will IV No, I mean basic education. Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, etc.


Jessica That's never addressed in the books. By the time the students are at Hogwarts (or other wizarding schools) they are 11. I would assume that is being covered in the individual households because obviously the students come to the wizarding schools literate.

Never thought about that!


message 25: by Hina (new) - rated it 5 stars

Hina Will and Jessica,

The students either go to muggle primary schools or they are home schooled and then they go to Hogwarts when they are eleven.


message 26: by Will (new) - rated it 3 stars

Will IV Yeah, I mean the book is just fiction, so it doesn't need to follow reality at all really, but it is curious. Even with basic reading and writing skills, education is really important for success in any area, and it's hard to imagine how these kids could succeed without a better understanding of the world around them. I can't imagine how they could succeed in magic without first learning basic skills like critical thinking, reasoning, problem solving, creative thinking, analyzing data, etc. that are learned from arithmetic, reading, and writing.


Rachel Will wrote: "I haven't read past the first 2 books, does anyone know if they mention how the students obtain their education in other fields besides magic?"

Nope, although I always assumed that parents either sent their kids to Muggle primary schools (risky in case of accidental magic a.k.a. Harry-on-the-roof) or home-schooled them until they were 11. I think Arithmancy would give them some math skills, but not everyone takes it. They probably learn writing from all of the essays for every class.


Jayjay Well, first of all, at least two houses have the same class at the same time, for one age group. Some of them have lunch hour at different times, and they have study hour too, so it wouldn't be too hard.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

Jayjay3 wrote: "Well, first of all, at least two houses have the same class at the same time, for one age group. Some of them have lunch hour at different times, and they have study hour too, so it wouldn't be too..."

yah, wat he/she said. i seriously think they had it all under control... well most of the time
;)


message 30: by Claire (last edited Nov 03, 2011 03:55PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Claire V Probably JK rowling had a brain fart and couldn't think of any more teachers. Buy Jayjay3 is right.


Jayjay Maybe, or maybe there are more teachers, just they don't mention them at all.


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

Kim wrote: "Im pretty sure there are other teachers who we don't hear about. I mean in my school there were 2,200 kids and I saw a handful of teachers around. However there were about 60 other teachers I never..."
i agree. i've read the books 5 times each (not kidding i am a HUGE harry potter fan) and i figure that there must be more that we dont see or hear about at all. like the muggle studies teacher. the 1st time we heard about her was in the deathly hallows


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

Claire wrote: "Probably JK rowling had a brain fart and couldn't think of any more teachers. Buy Jayjay3 is right."

ummm.....no.


message 34: by Kim (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kim Jordan wrote: "Kim wrote: "Im pretty sure there are other teachers who we don't hear about. I mean in my school there were 2,200 kids and I saw a handful of teachers around. However there were about 60 other teac..."

Agreeddd


message 35: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy I imagine magic would help to lighten the marking load a fair amount.
Also I agree with the theory that we just don't meet a whole lot of teachers. I mean does anyone know who Hermione's Arithmancy professor is? What about Ancient Runes?
I also subscribe to the reasoning that every class isn't taken every day. I mean once they get to sixth year the students have a lot of what Ron thought was going to be free time right? So some of your 400 don't necessarily have classes a lot of the time.


Rachel Therese wrote: "Will wrote: "Yeah, I mean the book is just fiction, so it doesn't need to follow reality at all really, but it is curious. Even with basic reading and writing skills, education is really important ..."

I learned at least a little about writing in elementary school, and I guess they just learned by writing. I'm sure the essays increased in difficulty year by year, and the professors gave feedback (in Snape's case, a lot of it).

As for critical thinking, reasoning, problem solving, etc., unless they were taught that through essays as well, the only class that would be much help there would be Potions, since it requires a knowledge of ingredients, how they interact with one another, and so on. Snape was probably pretty heavy with the logic in class, going by the puzzle he created to protect the Stone in Book 1. I always thought that despite being my favorite character, he was an awful teacher, but now that I think about it, his class probably gave the students more basic skills than any other class despite his less-than-stellar teaching methods.


Icantreadwhyamihere And why is Hogwarts a castle of that magnitude? my school is probably about 1/12 the size of hogwarts and has about 400 people in it and it still has spare rooms. And when the founders of hogwarts 'founded' it there would have probably been even less students.


message 38: by Jayjay (last edited Nov 04, 2011 06:47AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jayjay I think we actually heard about her first in the...fourth? I've also read them 5 times. I'm pretty sure it was before the 7th cause they murder her right? I don't know...brain fart! Anyways, I bet there are a lot more teachers, and they all have lots of breaks (unless filled by Quidditch...) so even if there weren't more teachers, they wouldn't have to have time turners.


Jessica Perhaps the basic education is done at Hogwarts but it's not something that Rowling focuses on. Since it isn't a major aspect of the story, it's not worth our time in words.

As for the size of the castle, we should remember that all the teachers, students, and other staff live there. It probably is as vast as it is due to the fact that you want some space (to hopefully cut down on any frustration caused by living in close quarters).

I also agree with Rachel about Snape. I'm sure he- and other teachers- were certainly discussing logic and other basic skills in class but it's not something we really see, other than in significant scenes like book 1.

As an afterthought, did anyone try to figure out the riddle in book 1 before they continued reading? I did... and I wasn't successful. :) No Hermione by any stretch of the imagination.


Joseph Badal What teachers in their right minds would want to be at a place where a bunch of adolescents are running around with magic wants?


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Or it's possible that they all have timeturners but that still doesn't explain other subjects since you don't even hear about other teachers until they take their classes in later years.


Coletta Fuller Valerie wrote: "I guess not a lot of teachers are needed. Also, not a lot of people can be trusted. At least not by Dumbledore anyways. You might just have to ask JK Rowling herself for the exact answer. A lot of ..."

Dumbledore finds the good in anyone.


message 43: by Liz (new)

Liz Reads Whoops. I meant to write "magic wands".


Steve Therese wrote: "Will wrote: "Yeah, I mean the book is just fiction, so it doesn't need to follow reality at all really, but it is curious. Even with basic reading and writing skills, education is really important ..."

Just see how well how many of the adult wizarding characters did turn out thanks to Hogwarts education! Psychopathic killers, kowtowing political lackeys, narcissistic charalatans...hmmm, just like the Muggle World!


Ashlyn oh, yeah i know! i mean, with that many students, you'd think that there would be more teachers but there was probably too many teacher that Rowling just picked the main or improtant ones


message 46: by Hina (new) - rated it 5 stars

Hina It really is not possible that all the teachers have time turners as there are a number of formalities that you need to go through and all of them got destroyed in the fifth book.


message 47: by [deleted user] (last edited Nov 05, 2011 07:44AM) (new)

Hina wrote: "It really is not possible that all the teachers have time turners as there are a number of formalities that you need to go through and all of them got destroyed in the fifth book."

Ah. I forgot that somehow. It is possible that Rowling just didn't mention them till they came up and some of them just never came up.


rebecca j They had to have classes in basics too, that is just a given, but we don't need to know about them for the story. If you look at the schedules they have, there is plenty of time left for basics. You know they're covered because many of the adult jobs require them too, like banking or running a shop, or politics, or civil service.


Alona Perlin Because the students run the school and they are probably more talented than the professors!


message 50: by Hina (new) - rated it 5 stars

Hina Alona wrote: "Because the students run the school and they are probably more talented than the professors!"

Just, no.


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