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Possible Works for 2012

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message 1: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Norcott-mahany | 52 comments Achebe, Chinua, Things Fall Apart, 20th c. work ; non-western
Bronte, Emily, Wuthering Heights, Woman Author; British
Cao Xueqin, Dream of the Red Chamber, Non-Western
Cooper, James Fenimore, Deerslayer or Last of the Mohicans, American
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan, A Study in Scarlet or The Lost World, British
Hansberry, Lorraine, Raisin in the Sun, 20th c.; American; woman author
Heller, Joseph, Catch 22, 20th c. work; American
Mallory, Thomas, Morte D’Arthur, British
Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, Greco-Roman
Marie de France, Lais of Marie de France, Woman Author ; French
O’Neill, Eugene, The Iceman Cometh, 20th c. work; American
Plato, Symposium, Greco-Roman
Sei Shonagon, Pillow Book, Non-Western; woman
Shakespeare, William, Macbeth or Hamlet, Shakespeare
Tagore, Rabindranath, I Won’t Let You Go: Selected Poems, Non-Western; 20th c.
Tennyson, Alfred Lord, Idylls of the King, British
Thurber, James, My Life and Hard Times, 20th c.; American
Unknown, The Gospel of Mark, Bible
Unknown, Mahabharata, Non-Western; long work
Unknown, Tales of the Arabian Nights, Non-Western

As we generally see a film loosely based on the Shakespeare film, Akira Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" is based on "Macbeth," while the movie, "Strange Brew" is based very loosely on "Hamlet."


message 2: by Clif, moderator (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Because of the publicity from the recent book, "The Swerve: How the World Became Modern" by Stephen Greenblatt, the interest in the following book has been raised, and is one to consider for our group.

Lucretius, On the Nature of Things, Greco-Roman, poetry


message 3: by Clif, moderator (last edited Oct 30, 2011 04:22PM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Mahabharata is too long. According to Wikipedia it's about 13,000 pages in 19 volumes (10 times the length of the Iliad and Odyssey combined).

I recommend limiting it to the Bhagavad Gita which is part of the Mahabharata and is often published as a separate volume. I have a volume of it on my shelf (unread). It's 97 pages long.


message 4: by Clif, moderator (last edited Nov 02, 2011 09:37AM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
If we're looking for movies based on Shakespeare's work, here's a list I found on the internet:
A Double Life (1947) Othello
A Thousand Acres (1997) King Lear
All Night Long (1962) Othello
Catch My Soul (1974) Othello
Forbidden Planet (1956) The Tempest
King of Texas (2002) King Lear
Kiss Me Kate (1948) The Taming of the Shrew
Let the Devil Wear Black (1999) Hamlet
Men of Respect (1991) Macbeth
My Own Private Idaho (1991) Henry IV and Henry V plays
Ran (1985) King Lear
Romeo Must Die (2000) Romeo and Juliet
Scotland, PA (2001) Macbeth
She’s the Man (2006) Twelfth Night
Strange Brew (1983) Hamlet
The Boys from Syracuse (1940) Comedy of Errors
Tower of London (1939) Richard III
Were the World Mine (2008) A Midsummer’s Night Dream
West Side Story (1961) Romeo and Juliet
Yellow Sky (1943) The Tempest

When I started the research I was looking for a movie based on "The Merchant of Venice." I found the following, however it is a movie of the story by Shakespeare, not a movie loosely based on it.
The Merchant of Venice with Al Pacino (2004)


message 5: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Norcott-mahany | 52 comments Clif wrote: "If we're looking for movies based on Shakespeare's work, here's a list I found on the internet:
A Double Life (1947) Othello
A Thousand Acres (1997) King Lear
All Night Long (1962) Othello
Catc..."


I have a copy of "All Night Long," which film features the Dave Brubeck Quartet -- it was on TCM a few months ago.


message 6: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Norcott-mahany | 52 comments Clif wrote: "Because of the publicity from the recent book, "The Swerve: How the World Became Modern" by Stephen Greenblatt, the interest in the following book has been raised, and is one to consider for our gr..."

If we go with this text, the standard translation is the Copley translation. The Penguin translation (don't have the translator) should also be good. My favorite would be the translation by Rolfe Humphries, which goes under the title "The Way Things Are."


message 7: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Norcott-mahany | 52 comments Clif wrote: "Mahabharata is too long. According to Wikipedia it's about 13,000 pages in 19 volumes (10 times the length of the Iliad and Odyssey combined).

I recommend limiting it to the Bhagavad Gita which i..."


And the "Bhagavad Gita" would not be our long book.


message 8: by Clif, moderator (last edited Nov 02, 2011 07:01PM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Bernard wrote: "And the "Bhagavad Gita" would not be our long book."

That's true, but there's plenty of long works to choose from. I think "The Arabian Nights" can be classed as a long work at over 1,000 pages. Below are some classics that come in at over 1,000 pages.

The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights by Anonymous, 1049 pages

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, 1276 pages

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, 1232 pages

The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu, 1182 pages

The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding, 1024 pages

In Search of Lost Time (Remembrance of Things Past): by Marcel Proust, 4211 pages << (Maybe too long)


message 9: by Clif, moderator (last edited Nov 03, 2011 07:43AM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
After posting the above comment about long books, I have learned that The Tale of Genji would qualify under three categories at once: (1) Large work (1000+ pages), (2) by a woman author, and (3) non-western literature. According to Wikipedia, "It is sometimes called the world's first novel [11th Century], the first modern novel, the first psychological novel or the first novel still to be considered a classic."

More Interesting Information:
Sei Shonagon, author of the nonfiction The Pillow Book was a contemporary and erstwhile rival of Lady Murasaki, whose novel, The Tale of Genji, fictionalized the 11th century Japanese court life.


message 10: by Clif, moderator (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
I've prepared a tabulation of the books suggested so far with them grouped by category. I'm suggesting that a list such as this could be used to help make the selection of books for 2012.
LINK TO BOOK SELECTION LIST
I plan to update the list as required. A separate list will need to be made of the books that our group has discussed in the past.


message 11: by Bernard (new)

Bernard Norcott-mahany | 52 comments Clif wrote: "Bernard wrote: "And the "Bhagavad Gita" would not be our long book."

That's true, but there's plenty of long works to choose from. I think "The Arabian Nights" can be classed as a long work at ove..."


Even a little Proust seems like too much -- please, please no Proust!


message 12: by Clif, moderator (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Bernard wrote: "...please, please no Proust! "

That's funny. Now you have my curiosity up since I've never read Proust.


message 13: by Clif, moderator (last edited Nov 08, 2011 05:36PM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Here's an idea. Maybe be can appeal to a whole new group of people to join our group by selecting a book that was the 1782 equivalent of pulp fiction:
Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Pierre A.F. Choderlos de Laclos


message 14: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Riels | 2 comments Here are the recommendations I have at this point.

Bible: I'm for reading the gospel of Mark.

Woman: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

American: Herman Melville, Moby Dick; Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida or Measure for Measure

Non-western: I'm for the Bhagavad Gita; alternative, Lao-tzu (Laozi), Tao te Ching

Greek/Roman: I'm for Lucretius, De rerum natura; alternative, Plato, Symposium


message 15: by Clif, moderator (last edited Nov 10, 2011 06:51AM) (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
Another Idea (more serious than my last idea):
The play, "The Misanthrope," written by Moliere (circa 1666) is a classic to consider for our group, and there is a 2001 movie that is based on it (description below):

The Misanthrope (the movie) 85 min - Comedy
Artemis is a bum. As a failed actor, low-quality school teacher and disappointed lover, he is looking for a direction in life. When he fails to be cast in a local production of the Misanthrope, and the beloved school theater director passes away, he sees hope in an idea. And so Artemis sets out to direct a group of essentially talentless inner-city grade-school kids in Moliere's The Misanthrope. Though the road is rocky at first, Artemis, with the help of the School Principal, begins to pull his play, and his life, back together again. The film was shot at The Arthur Noble public school in downtown Chicago during the school year. Many of the kids who appear in the background in school shots were actual school kids, most of them unaware they were being shot.


message 16: by Clif, moderator (new)

Clif Hostetler (clif_) | 377 comments Mod
According to my PageADay Book Lover's Calendar, today is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Catch-22. That means it qualifies to be considered for inclusion on our group's schedule for 2012. Below is copy of the review from my calendar.
PERENNIAL CLASSIC
Catch-22 was written about World War II, but to students in the ’60s it was about the Vietnam War. How does Heller’s brilliant, bloody satire of the “logic” of war hold up in the 21st century for the Iraq War and the Afghanistan War? Today is the 50th anniversary of the book’s publication. We invite you to spend some time with Yossarian, Milo Minderbinder, Colonel Cathcart, and, of course, Snowden and his secret. The Modern Library ranked Catch-22 number seven in its list of the 100 greatest novels of the 20th century.
CATCH-22 , by Joseph Heller (1961; Simon & Schuster, 1996)


message 17: by Tim (new)

Tim | 6 comments Just a thought, but Shakespeare in the Park will be performing Anthony & Cleopatra and Midsummer Nights Dream in July


message 18: by Tim (new)

Tim | 6 comments For a repeat, I would like to suggest either Dante's Divine Comedy, Milton's Paradise Lost, or Virgil' Aeneid


message 19: by Tim (new)

Tim | 6 comments How about Life on the Mississippi or something else by Mark Twain?


message 20: by Tim (new)

Tim | 6 comments It looks ,ike we already have a pretty good list to choose from, but here are a couple other suggestions:
- The Red Badge of Courage
- Ann Frank's Diary


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