The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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message 1: by Michelle (last edited Oct 28, 2011 08:46PM) (new)

Michelle | 3 comments Hi everyone,

My name is Michelle and I’m a TV producer who lives in Manhattan (NY, NY). I’ve been addicted to the mystery/crime/thriller genre ever since I first discovered Trixie Belden, Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys back in elementary school. I love many American mystery/crime/thriller novelists. Daniel Silva is my all-time favorite. However, I have become recently obsessed with Scandinavian crime novels and have discovered a treasure trove of great authors. (I belong to the Scandinavian/Nordic Crime Book group, too.) So if anyone is looking for compelling mysteries, etc. while waiting for their favorite American authors’ new books, I highly recommend you explore that region of the world...

I look forward to enjoying thrillers and unraveling mysteries with all of you...


message 2: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35959 comments I, too, like the Scandinavian. Recently been discovering Tartan Noir.

It is a dark world out there.

Welcome.


message 3: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Hi Michelle, and welcome to the group. I prefer the cozies and near cozies, so I'll leave the recommending to the other members of the group. We have read several Scandinavians with the monthly group reads, so if you want to check those out you can find them in the "Group Reads" folder. The threads never close, so you can jump into the conversation if you want.

Give my best to my native NYC.


message 4: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Hi Michelle, Mysteries provide a great opportunity for armchair travel too. Check out the UN International challenge for great recommendations for mysteries set is far off places.


message 5: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments Donna wrote: "Hi Michelle, Mysteries provide a great opportunity for armchair travel too. Check out the UN International challenge for great recommendations for mysteries set is far off places."

If South America appeals to you for armchair travel, my first Amazon Kindle mystery book "The Empanada Affair" takes place mostly in Salta, Argentina, in Argentina's northwest region. My second, "The Ambivalent Corpse", is mainly set in Montevideo, Uruguay, with some significant additional travel through Uruguay and onwards through southwest Brazil to Iguazu Falls on the Brazil-Argentina-Paraguay border. We've lived in both Salta and Montevideo, so the details are pretty authentic. Book #3, currently untitled in utero, will be set in Peru and Northern Chile.


message 6: by Jannene (new)

Jannene | 771 comments Michelle wrote: "Hi everyone,

My name is Michelle and I’m a TV producer who lives in Manhattan (NY, NY). I’ve been addicted to the mystery/crime/thriller genre ever since I first discovered Trixie Belden, Nancy ..."


Does Daniel Silva's books need to be read in order for the Gabriel Allon Series? My in-laws gave me 4 of the series and I'm wondering if I need to go back and read the first ones so I don't miss anything.


message 7: by Michelle (new)

Michelle | 3 comments Hi Jannene,

It’s great that you have four books in-hand! While it’s not absolutely vital that you read them in sequence, I think you’ll enjoy the series more if you do. I actually started with the 3rd or 4th book and then played catch up and read them in order after that. That said, Silva does an excellent job filling in the gaps of what historically has happened between the characters so it’s not absolutely necessary. But if I were to do it all over, I would have read them in sequence. Enjoy!!!

I


message 8: by Michelle (new)

Michelle | 3 comments Backing up and seeing everyone else’s comments. Thanks for the additional suggestions!! I will check them out!

Hayes: I’m not sure what you mean by cozies and near cozies...


message 9: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Hi Michelle, a "cozy" is a kind of crime fiction with little sex and violence and the crime-solver is usually an amateur female detective with a job that lets her meet lots of people: caterer, bed and breakfast owner, dog trainer, etc.

By near cozy (and these are my all time favorite things to read) I would include the Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane stories by Dorothy L. Sayers Whose Body?, the Holmes/Russell series by Laurie R. King The Beekeeper's Apprentice, or the Maisie Dobbs series Maisie Dobbs.

I am not a big fan of "grit" so Dennis Lehane and co. are not my first choice when I'm looking for something to read.


message 10: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments Hayes: What would you call the genre bender if I took my usual dark and violent universe for one of my books and incorporated characters and settings from my wife's hobby of dog breeding and showing? We've been discussing the premise. Still "too gritty" or cozy?


message 11: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Dunno, Jerry. I'm not good with labels. I just learned what a cozy was a few months ago!

Can someone else help?


message 12: by T (new)

T (twoo) | 18420 comments Jerry wrote: "Hayes: What would you call the genre bender if I took my usual dark and violent universe for one of my books and incorporated characters and settings from my wife's hobby of dog breeding and showi..."

Jerry - if it's still dark & violent, I wouldn't think it would qualify for cozy? You might get us dog fans, though! :-)


message 13: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments T: Our dogs are German Shorthaired Pointers. Less fur than your icon, but same nationality. Would that work?


message 14: by T (new)

T (twoo) | 18420 comments Us dog people may not get as specific as breed... :-)

In that dark vein, I liked the Sawtelle book....And The Art of Racing in the Rain.


message 15: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments The Art of Racing in the Rain was a little too much of a tear-jerker for my taste, but well written. My pleasure reading is mostly mysteries these days.


message 16: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35959 comments Jerry wrote: "The Art of Racing in the Rain was a little too much of a tear-jerker for my taste, but well written. My pleasure reading is mostly mysteries these days."

I liked the dog in Art but not so much on most of the story. It had me crying as I drove down the highway. Tears don't mix well with driving.

The only thing about dogs in books - I don't like them sacrificed for the sake of a story. I know they're not real dogs. Guess I think they should be more characters than plot devices.


message 17: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments Jan C. In the discussions about this hypothetical book thus far all of the darkness and violence will be directed at evil breeders and corrupt dog show judges. No dogs will be hurt in the writing. How could one even suggest such a thing!


message 18: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35959 comments Oh, that's good. I picked up a book the other week and the first scene had someone killing a dog just to get back at someone. I found it disgusting and didn't read any further.


message 19: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Michael | 674 comments Jerry wrote: "Hayes: What would you call the genre bender if I took my usual dark and violent universe for one of my books and incorporated characters and settings from my wife's hobby of dog breeding and showi..."

I don't know, but will tell you that a very good friend and I (now both senior citizens and more or less retired from active showing) did a great deal of travelling to shows during our middle-aged/ early senior years and decided that two 'little old ladies' who were obviously a bit batty and often confused would be the ideal assassins/ hit women. All they would need to do to establish an alibi would be to be at a dog show where it is very easy to disappear for a couple of hours and everyone assumes you are simply grooming, eating, walking dogs or crashed in the motor home.

I guess, depending on the type of victims, it could be either cozy or much more toward the grim side.


message 20: by Jerold (new)

Jerold Last (goodreadscomjerold_last) | 252 comments Sharon wrote: "Jerry wrote: "Hayes: What would you call the genre bender if I took my usual dark and violent universe for one of my books and incorporated characters and settings from my wife's hobby of dog bree..."

Sharon: I'm liking this process. Everybody should jump in with their suggestions and maybe we can write this one by committee. Our puppy Schoene just got the major she needed and finished her championship two weeks ago at a GSP specialty show in Pleasanton, CA, and I would swear I saw those two 'little old ladies' who were obviously a bit batty and often confused there a couple of times. There was also a handler's judge who dumped her the day before and a couple of professional handlers who could be the victims.....


message 21: by Sharon (last edited Nov 03, 2011 06:26PM) (new)

Sharon Michael | 674 comments Jerry wrote: "I would swear I saw those two 'little old ladies' who were obviously a bit batty and often confused there a couple of times. There was also a handler's judge who dumped her the day before and a couple of professional handlers who could be the victims..... "

And if you wanted to go darker, you could always sidestep the crooked judge/pro handler link, just use the dog show scene as the background and come up with an abused wife ... child ... even 'professional hit' on someone entirely unconnected to the dog show world. Or a link somehow to a shelter for abused women/children who were at the mercy of the court system and could not get away from the abuser. Or a hit on an abuser or killer who is released on technicalities or witnesses disappearing. For more contrast and possibly less cozy, younger assistant with older woman, who does the actual hits and more physical bits. Lots of different ways to go for more cozy or darker.


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