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Rick R. Reed
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message 1: by Dreamspinner (new)

Dreamspinner Press (dreamspinnerpress) | 2637 comments Mod
Rick R. Reed joins us today from 1-6 EST to celebrate the release of his newest book, Caregiver. Drop by for excerpts, a Q&A, giveaways, and more!


message 2: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Rick, I'll try to pop in and out. You KNOW I love your work.


message 3: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Hi everyone! And welcome! It's 10 am here in Seattle and it's a foggy, gray morning. I hope you'll all stick around for questions, excerpts, and a couple of giveaways of my latest, the AIDS-era love story, Caregiver by Rick R. Reed


message 4: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Feel free to ask me anything. I look forward to talking with you. Here's a little bit of what CAREGIVER is about:
SYNOPSIS
It’s 1991, and Dan Calzolaio has just moved to Florida with his lover, Mark, having fled Chicago and Mark’s addictions to begin a new life on the Gulf Coast. Volunteering for the Tampa AIDS Alliance is just one part of that new beginning, and that’s how Dan meets his new buddy, Adam.

Adam Schmidt is not at all what Dan expected. The guy is an original—witty, wry, and sarcastic with a fondness for a smart black dress, Barbra Streisand, and a good mai tai. Adam doesn’t let his imminent death get him down, even through a downward spiral that sees him thrown in jail.

Each step of Adam’s journey teaches Dan new lessons about strength and resilience, but it’s Adam’s lover, Sullivan, to whom Dan feels an almost irresistible pull. Dan knows the attraction isn’t right, even after he dumps his cheating, drug-abusing boyfriend. But then Adam passes away, and it leaves Sullivan and Dan both alone to see if they can turn their love for Adam into something whole and real for each other.


message 5: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Just as a point of reference: looking out my office window right now, I see Lake Union, houseboats, regular boats, seaplanes taking off and landing, the Eastlake neighborhood across the water, and beyond that, the Cascade Mountains looking like blue gray silhouettes against a cloudy sky. What's it like where you are?


message 6: by Tracy (new)

Tracy Hi Rick! I'm also one of your Twitter follower. I'm coming to you from Boise--not too far away. It is a beautiful early fall day here. The tress and shrubs are starting to turn so it is very colorful.

I read the Victor Banis' review of CAREGIVER, which was really great. I have to admit to being a little concerned like Victor mentioned I'm not really into AIDS novels, but this seems like so much more. Is this story somewhat based on a real-life event?


message 7: by Shae (new)

Shae Connor (shaeconnor) Hi, Rick! You know I've been stalking you like crazy over this book. Totally, totally worth it. I love this story so much. :)

The weather where I am (Atlanta) is absolutely gorgeous, sunny and cool with just a few puffy white clouds. My view isn't nearly so great as yours, though. The offices and parking lots around us are being ripped out (ours will go before much longer), so it looks like a new world is being built outside. Which I guess it is, in a way. :)


message 8: by Shira (new)

Shira Anthony (shiraanthony) | 87 comments I was in college during the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980's. I knew a few men who died of the disease back then, when there were few, if any, treatments available. Is "Caregiver" drawn from some of your own experiences?


message 9: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Rick wrote: "Feel free to ask me anything. I look forward to talking with you. Here's a little bit of what CAREGIVER is about:
SYNOPSIS
It’s 1991, and Dan Calzolaio has just moved to Florida with his lover, Ma..."

Rick, baby, you slay me. Just the synopsis and here I am, in tears. Well done, you.


message 10: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments TracyG wrote: "Hi Rick! I'm also one of your Twitter follower. I'm coming to you from Boise--not too far away. It is a beautiful early fall day here. The tress and shrubs are starting to turn so it is very col..."

Hi Tracy...I suspect we're sharing similar weather. Yes, CAREGIVER is based on my own experiences as an AIDS buddy back in 1991 (when AIDS was a death sentence) back in Tampa, FL. "Adam" was, in real life, Jim, and everything that happens to him in the book is true.


message 11: by J.P. (new)

J.P. Barnaby (jpbarnaby) | 121 comments Hi Rick.

It was great meeting you at GRL. :)

I just downloaded Caregiver and I can't wait to start reading...


message 12: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Shira wrote: "I was in college during the onset of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980's. I knew a few men who died of the disease back then, when there were few, if any, treatments available. Is "Caregiver" drawn f..."

Yes, Shira, the book is drawn in large part from my own life, especially the part about "Adam" my AIDS buddy. He was a very real person I will never forget. I hope, somewhere, he's honored by my tribute to him.


message 13: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Cherie wrote: "Rick wrote: "Feel free to ask me anything. I look forward to talking with you. Here's a little bit of what CAREGIVER is about:
SYNOPSIS
It’s 1991, and Dan Calzolaio has just moved to Florida with ..."


Didn't mean to make you cry, Cherie. Well, yes, actually I did. I'm glad the synopsis resonated so well with you--I hope the book does the same. By the way, it DOES have a happy ending...


message 14: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Fessenden | 182 comments Hi! I'm at work, so I can only pop in now and then. It snowed here (in New Hampshire) and we're expecting more this weekend. :-p

This book looks like something I might "enjoy" (if you can say that about a book in which a major character passes away), but I've been curious: have you shifted away from horror stories recently? If so, is there a particular reason?


message 15: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Shae wrote: "Hi, Rick! You know I've been stalking you like crazy over this book. Totally, totally worth it. I love this story so much. :)

The weather where I am (Atlanta) is absolutely gorgeous, sunny and c..."


Thank you, Shae. I have been to Atlanta several times and love the city!


message 16: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments J.P. wrote: "Hi Rick.

It was great meeting you at GRL. :)

I just downloaded Caregiver and I can't wait to start reading..."


Great meeting you too! Hope you'll let me know what you think of the book. This one means a lot to me.


message 17: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Jamie wrote: "Hi! I'm at work, so I can only pop in now and then. It snowed here (in New Hampshire) and we're expecting more this weekend. :-p

This book looks like something I might "enjoy" (if you can say t..."


Hi Jamie...I was profiled this month in the Lambda Literary Review http://www.lambdaliterary.org/feature...
and I replied, "“The story of two people finding love after experiencing great loss was compelling enough without horrific or suspense undertones. I am finding more and more that writing about relationships—why they succeed, why they fail, what kind of vulnerabilities lay within all of our hearts—to be a very satisfying subject to write about.”


message 18: by J.P. (new)

J.P. Barnaby (jpbarnaby) | 121 comments Rick wrote: "Great meeting you too! Hope you'll let me know what you think of the book. This one means a lot to me."

I will. I can't imagine how hard it must be to go through - it will be a great emotional story. I love those. :)


message 19: by KevaD (new)

KevaD | 4 comments Mr. Reed,
Your writing awes me, but you already know that.
Just wanted to drop in and say I'll be reading this story, not just because you wrote it, but because I'm familiar with the backstory, which I'll never forget. Okay. Have to go buy some Kleenex before I start reading this book.
- DA Kentner


message 20: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments KevaD wrote: "Mr. Reed,
Your writing awes me, but you already know that.
Just wanted to drop in and say I'll be reading this story, not just because you wrote it, but because I'm familiar with the backstory, w..."


Thanks so much, DA. Glad you're familiar with the backstory. It's taken my twenty years to be able to put the story in a novel form.


message 21: by KevaD (new)

KevaD | 4 comments Last comment. Honest.
For those not familiar with Mr. Reed's superb ability to capture emotion, please read "Tales from the Sexual Underground."
That collection is one of the most moving pieces I've ever read.


message 22: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments KevaD wrote: "Last comment. Honest.
For those not familiar with Mr. Reed's superb ability to capture emotion, please read "Tales from the Sexual Underground."
That collection is one of the most moving pieces ..."


Comment as much as you want. Thanks for the shout out about TALES, which contains the original non-fiction piece from CAREGIVER grew.


message 23: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Is it time for a giveaway? For the first person who e-mails me the correct answer to the following question at horrorauthor@gmail.com will go a free ebook copy of the book. The question is: what was the treatment of choice for AIDS/HIV in 1991?


message 24: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Heh. Had a motorcycle accident in 1991, and the fellow I hit (in the same ambulance as me, I wiped out trying to avoid him) was on that med...and I had road rash all down my side. I was scared shitless.


message 25: by Arzu (last edited Oct 28, 2011 11:25AM) (new)

Arzu | 17 comments Mr Reed, first at all, I would like to thank you for taking the time to talk with us. I am a huge fan of your writing and read not all, but many of your books. I have to be honest and say that my expectations for Caregiver are very high.

Why?

As student - and because of a dare - I was active as volunteer in an organization who supported and accompanied gays who were HIV+ or already had AIDS. I was introduced to Willem who was in the final stage of the disease and at the end, I was the person who was with him during this phase of his life. This was the hardest thing I ever did as you feel everything, the pain, the joy, the disappointments, the expectations, ... together with the patient, for me Willem. I was lucky to have known him for almost 3 years. Willem's death almost broke me. There is still a part in me that is still suffering and never will heal. But I will never regret to have known and loved him. He was a 46-year-old man who died without family (he died in 1996). Only his partner, his friends and I were in the hospital.

I could go on about Willem and how beautiful he was, but this is about you and your books. I just wanted to say that the blurb reminded me so much of Willem and his partner and consequently my reason why I expect so much.


message 26: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Cherie...congrats on being the first to me with the correct answer. I have e-mailed you with details about the prize.


message 27: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Arzu...I suspect/hope I meet your expectations. Adam in the book is my Willem...and I went through everything you mentioned back in 1991. I'd love to hear your thoughts once you've read the book. I did try to mix in joy, optimism, and hope within a story that could be tragic. But I believe love is the antidote for loss.


message 28: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Rick wrote: "Arzu...I suspect/hope I meet your expectations. Adam in the book is my Willem...and I went through everything you mentioned back in 1991. I'd love to hear your thoughts once you've read the book. I..."
And you write it so very well. For anyone who hasn't yet read Rick's book, HOMECOMING get it and get reading. It's all about finding joy amongst the shadows and then coming out of the shadows to celebrate that joy to the fullest. A thorough delight.


message 29: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Thanks, Cherie...for the kind words about Homecoming. Homecoming by Rick R. Reed


message 30: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Which, by the way, is graced by another awesome Paul Richmond cover...


message 31: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy Pack (jeremypack) | 2 comments Rick,

Greetings from a fellow Seattleite! Congratulations on the superlative "Caregiver." I finished my marathon read yesterday and can't get it out of my head. I'm grateful and honored to have taken the journey. Hats off to you for your courage and spectacular writing!


message 32: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Jeremypack wrote: "Rick,

Greetings from a fellow Seattleite! Congratulations on the superlative "Caregiver." I finished my marathon read yesterday and can't get it out of my head. I'm grateful and honored to have ..."


Thanks, Jeremy. I'm thrilled the book remained with you; thanks for letting me know. I'm humbled...

Whereabouts in Seattle are you? I'm just above Lake Union a little south of the Fremont Bridge.


message 33: by Jeremy (new)

Jeremy Pack (jeremypack) | 2 comments Redmond at the moment. I live in Snohomish, however. I used to work right on Lake Union in the stubby brown building on the south (?) side of the lake. (Directionally challenged--I'm wont to get lost in my own driveway from time to time.)

You had me with the description of your view in the prologue and held me by the throat for the entire novel. My mother is, as we speak, weeping her way through it. She's such a girl. Haha.


message 34: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Here's an excerpt from the book. If any of you have ever waited on pins and needles for the results of an HIV test, this should resonate with you (especially if you waited for those results in the 1980s or 90s):

A guy about Dan’s own age in T-shirt and jeans came out from behind a door and looked around the waiting room. He spotted Dan and came over to him. Dan recalled the dark-haired man had checked him in when he arrived at the clinic. Dan thought he said his name was Carlos. Carlos leaned down close to Dan and said softly, “The counselor will see you now.”

Dan stood on unsteady legs, wondering why Carlos had bothered to make the trip into the waiting room just to tell him it was his turn to be seen. Calm down. They probably just do that to respect your privacy. It doesn’t mean he was softening the blow of what’s to come.

Dan followed the man back to a warren of small exam rooms and offices. Carlos gestured to one of them. “You can go in and have a seat. Becky will be in to see you in just a minute.”

Dan nodded, his stomach churning and a splash of acid rising to the back of his throat. This was the big moment. It could be life defining. Or death defining, depending on how the results went.

Dan sat after Carlos closed the door, glad there were no mirrors in the room because he was certain the glass would have thrown back the reflection of a man with a pasty white complexion, slick with sweat.
Dan feared he would throw up.

Becky came into the room. She reminded him of his mother, slightly overweight, with permed dark brown hair, and oversized glasses. She looked about fifty and there was a kind aspect to her demeanor that made Dan paradoxically at ease and on guard.

She looked down at his file and then up at him, smiling.

What would she say? How would she put it?

Dan felt himself grow faint.

“Dan. I’m sorry, but your test came back positive for HIV antibodies.”

Dan felt as though he would drop to the floor. He had expected this, knew it was coming, yet it was no easier to bear. His life was over. When would he start getting sick? When would the first ailment make its deadly appearance? Which infection would it be? How long would it take before AIDS extinguished his light?
He searched for words to put in his mouth, but it seemed as though the connection between his brain and his mouth had been severed. He could only stare, slack-jawed, at the motherly woman.

“I’m sorry, honey. But this doesn’t have to be bad news. They are coming up with new treatments all the time! No worries! Before you even get sick, I’m sure they’ll have something for you.” Becky laughed. “You’ll die of old age before that old AIDS monster gets you!” she laughed again.

“Are you sure?” Dan sputtered.

“Sure I’m sure! You’re gonna be just fine! You’ll see.”

“No. I mean, are you sure about the results?”

“Oh yeah, honey. The test doesn’t lie. You’re gay, right?”

Dan nodded, numb.

“And you know what gay stands for, doncha?”

Dan put a hand to his mouth to stifle the wave of hysterical laughter threatening to burst from his lips. He knew what she was going to say.

“Got AIDS yet?” Becky slapped the desk, laughing and Dan joined her, laughing until his sides ached, until tears poured from his eyes. The pair paused in the hilarity for a moment, looked at one another, and started laughing all over again.

“Mr. Calzolaio? Mr. Calzolaio, are you all right?” Becky leaned over him, concern radiating from her warm brown eyes.

Dan shook his head and the room came back into focus. He realized he had slipped away for a moment, maybe even fainted.

“Yes, yes. I think so. I’ve just been so nervous about this.” He looked up into Becky’s face.

“Let me get you some water.”

He grabbed her arm before she left the office. “No. I don’t need water. I need to know. Did you just tell me I was infected?”

Becky looked at him, cocking her head in confusion. “No, honey, that’s not what I said at all.” She hurried back around to the other side of the desk and sat. “I said just the opposite. You’re negative, sweetheart. But your ELISA test did come back positive the first time.”

Dan felt like the floor was coming out from under him once again.

“And when we ran the test a second time, it came back positive again, so we sent it for the Western Blot and that came back negative. That happens sometimes…but you’re okay.” She opened a drawer and handed him a pamphlet. “That explains how the testing works. But if the Western Blot is negative, you’re not infected.”

“You’re sure?”

Becky nodded. “You were worried about this, huh?”

Dan wanted to laugh again. “Yeah, a little bit.”

“Have you been exposed?” Becky peered at him from over the top of her glasses.

“No.” He paused, thinking. “Maybe. I don’t know.”

“Well, I need to tell you—there is what they call a window period, when you could be infected, but the tests don’t yet pick up on the antibodies.” She made sure Dan met her gaze and continued. “That’s why you need to make sure you play very safe.” She reached in the same drawer from which she had taken the pamphlet and pulled out a handful of condoms, setting them down in front of Dan. The bright metallic wrappers made him think she was offering him candy. “Don’t take any risks and make sure you come back in six months and get tested again, just to be certain. Okay?”

Dan thought he would abstain from any sex for the next six months—maybe forever. He stuffed the rubbers into his pocket anyway and stood.

“You gonna be all right?”

“Yeah. I’ll be fine. Thank you.” Dan left the office, feeling curiously numb and relieved all at once. A part of his heart ached because he knew this scene had played out so differently for Adam.


message 35: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Jeremypack wrote: "Redmond at the moment. I live in Snohomish, however. I used to work right on Lake Union in the stubby brown building on the south (?) side of the lake. (Directionally challenged--I'm wont to get lo..."

That's really nice to know (about your mom, I mean). It's great to hear from someone local. That description in the prologue is my own view...


message 36: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments Hey Rick, you already know all of my feelings about the book. It's kinda sad that I'm going to share this, but feel I have to. You know I'm on facebook, well one of the men I am frineds with on there posted a picture of someone yesterday, his partner, who died 22 years ago yesterday afernoon from AIDS. Rick, just thinking about it still bothers me.


message 37: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Mary wrote: "Hey Rick, you already know all of my feelings about the book. It's kinda sad that I'm going to share this, but feel I have to. You know I'm on facebook, well one of the men I am frineds with on the..."

Yeah, Mary, it IS sad...so many young lives lost. The good news is that the treatments we have today are keeping scores of people with HIV alive, healthy, and undetectable.


message 38: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Rick,
sorry sir Knight of AwesomeSauce Writing. I have a date with my current WIP, so I gotta duck out. Have fun, and I'll pop back around in an hour or so!


message 39: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments I know Rick, but damn, I just get too emotional, but I think you've already figured that out :-)


message 40: by Cherie (new)

Cherie Noel (cherienoel) | 71 comments Rick wrote: "Mary wrote: "Hey Rick, you already know all of my feelings about the book. It's kinda sad that I'm going to share this, but feel I have to. You know I'm on facebook, well one of the men I am frined..."
A dear friend of mine is a doctor who works in research in this area. I am always so very proud *sometimes unbearably so* of what he does to fight this disease.


message 41: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments Cherie, I would be proud of him too. And, I'm certain that my friend Mark, in Montana appreciates all everyone does to help fight it as he is HIV pos and has lived with it for over 20 years.


message 42: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Mary wrote: "Cherie, I would be proud of him too. And, I'm certain that my friend Mark, in Montana appreciates all everyone does to help fight it as he is HIV pos and has lived with it for over 20 years."

Mary, I hope it will do you good to know I have many close friends who have lived strong, healthy lives with HIV for more than two decades. For the most part, it's no longer a death sentence, as it was back in 1991, when my book takes place. Still, it's no picnic with all the meds and healthcare required to stay healthy... But I, for one, am so grateful for the enormous progress that's been made in the past 20 years or so.


message 43: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments Mark seems to be doing well, at least he is now that he is away from the drugs and alcohol. His current partner takes pretty good care of him, makes sure he does what he's supposed to do and doesn't the things he's not. He's been with Wes for over 3 years and had a few setbacks, but he told me while we were there that it's where he intends to be die. Kind of morbid, but he's where he wants to be, far away from his family. He knows I'm here if he needs me.


message 44: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments I forgot to mention to you all. There's a giveaway right here on Goodreads for an autographed, signed copy of CAREGIVER. Go here to enter: http://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/sho...

I'm working on another excerpt to post right now...and we will also not conclude the day without another ebook giveaway!


message 45: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments Thanks Rick!


message 46: by Arzu (new)

Arzu | 17 comments Rick wrote: "Arzu...I suspect/hope I meet your expectations. Adam in the book is my Willem...and I went through everything you mentioned back in 1991. I'd love to hear your thoughts once you've read the book. I..."

I don't think I will be disappointed. You're a great writer.

And I am so glad that treatments for HIV and AIDS are improved, compared to the 90's. It is still not perfect, but like you said nowadays people with the virus are able to live a happy and productive life.


message 47: by K.Z. (new)

K.Z. Snow (kzsnow) | 260 comments I loved the first excerpt -- it gave me the shivers, actually -- and can't wait to read the second.

A dear friend who stood up to my wedding died of AIDS. My current SO's brother died of AIDS. A female friend is living with HIV. I'm almost afraid to read Caregiver, but I know the experience will be worth it.

Thanks for writing this, Rick. <3


message 48: by Rick (new)

Rick | 139 comments Here's another excerpt from CAREGIVER. Enjoy...and if you're so moved, let me know what you think.

Dan settled onto the blanket and took off his shirt, which drew a wolf whistle from Adam. “Good God, kid, look at those pecs. I’m surprised your lover let you out the door, knowing you’d be shirtless in public.”
Dan felt heat rise to his face. He didn’t know what to say.

“Good thing we came here instead of Passe a Grille,” Adam said, referring to the south end of that particular beach, which was famous (or infamous) as a gay gathering place. “I am not sure at all how long I’d have been able to hang onto you. The boys would be lining up to ply you with drinks at the Lighted Tree.”

“What’s the Lighted Tree?”

“Honey, you don’t know? How long have you lived here again?”

“Only a few months.”

“And you’re gay, right?”

Dan snickered, digging his toes in the edge of the sand. “Yeah.”

“Well, Passe a Grille and the Lighted Tree are the gay hot spots on Sundays and pretty much other days as well… at least on this side of the bay. “The ‘tree’ is an open-air bar favored by the girls, but plenty of gay guys go there too. It has a little guest house where I once trysted with one of the maintenance men.” Adam looked faraway, and Dan wondered about Sullivan. He assumed that the pair of them were like him and Mark, only here in Florida for a few months… and he assumed together.

I guess I’m just old-fashioned, Dan thought. “What did Sullivan think about that?”

Adam eyed him, lighting a cigarette and then searching in his bag for two plastic cups. He poured margaritas for them. “Sorry I didn’t bring a lime.” He handed a cup to Dan. “Or rim the edges of the glass with salt. I usually like to rim.” He snorted. “Getting back to your question, though—Sullivan’s motto is ‘what I don’t know won’t hurt me’.”

Dan sipped. “So you guys have sort of an agreement?”

Dan had yet to understand gay men and their open relationships. He was a one-man kind of guy himself and couldn’t really stomach the thought of simply allowing Mark to be with other men, even if it meant some unspoken agreement where each of them looked the other way.

“Agreements are sometimes made by actions, dear boy.”

“Okay….” Dan didn’t quite understand.

“When one is not getting what one needs at home, one must sometimes look elsewhere for satisfaction.”

A dim bulb flickered to tawdry light above Dan’s head.

“I get it.”

“I can see you’re appalled.” Adam placed a comforting hand on Dan’s forearm. “I kind of wish Sullivan and I were together as a monogamous couple myself, but ever since I started getting sick—really sick—you know, where it was obvious….” He pointed to a purple lesion on his flat stomach, and Dan also noticed Adam’s protruding ribs. “When Sullivan started noticing that and having to visit me in the hospital as I lingered dramatically, flirting with death, he kind of pulled away from me in the bedroom.” Adam smiled brightly, but even behind the purple shades, Dan thought he could just about see tears glistening at the corners of his eyes. “I understand. I don’t hold it against him, much as I wish he’d hold it against me once in a while.” Adam snorted. “I mean, lesions and a dry cough, fatigue, trouble breathing, wasting, diarrhea, night sweats—it ain’t exactly a recipe for sexiness, sugar.”

Dan had a sudden urge to wrap his arms around Adam. How awful it must be—to be betrayed by one’s own body and kindly disregarded by one’s lover. How lonely he must feel. Dan actually started to lean toward Adam, situating his cup so it wouldn’t spill, when his friend ground his cigarette into the sand, covering it, and placing his own cup in a little indentation in the sand. His voice choking only slightly, he stood and cried out, “Last one in is a rotten fag!” He sprinted toward the surf, not slowing as he came to the water, running, running, until he dove into a big swell of aquamarine water, which swallowed him up.

Dan followed slowly.


message 49: by K.Z. (new)

K.Z. Snow (kzsnow) | 260 comments ...And more shivers.


message 50: by Mary (new)

Mary Gresham | 13 comments K.Z., it was hard for me to read, but at least with the happy ending, I did ok, even without Rick holding my hand!


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