Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Harry Potter, #1) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone discussion


945 views
VERY CONFUSED- fake edition?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 75 (75 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 2: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy If you mean the title then 'The Sorcerer's Stone' refers to the American edition of the book. For US copies, they replaced the word 'Philosopher' with 'Sorcerer', apparently (according to Google) as it is more of a recognised word over there.
Hope I helped.


Juliet hrmmmmmmmmmm.....don't really understand the question.....


Roseanne Philosopher and Sorcerer just marks the different books for UK and US. I think.


๑ஜ๑ Jαѕмιиє ๑ஜ๑ Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone & Harry Potter and the Philosopther's Stone are the same if thats what you mean..


Katie Publishers sometimes change titles when they publish books in different countries. There are lots of books that were changed same way that "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" was changed to "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" in the US. Another good example would be "Northern Lights" by Philip Pullman, which is "The Golden Compass" in the US. Same book, different title. Basically, for whatever reason, they decide the book will sell better with a different name in the US, so they change it. The book is otherwise the same book, though.


Kirsten This book title was changed when it came to the US for fear that kids wouldn't understand the title. A philosopher in the UK is the same thing as a sorcerer in the US.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) In America it's Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone. In the U.K. it's Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. Did that help?


Atlantic Gem ^
||

Wat those people said


Emily She had to change the title because nobody was buying the book.


Jessica McCollum Emily wrote: "She had to change the title because nobody was buying the book."
not true, its because philosophers stone means the same thing but in british. sorcerers stone is american


message 12: by Amy (new) - rated it 5 stars

Amy There are slight variances in the language/slang between the British and American versions - words American kids would not recognize (like "boot" versus "trunk").


Amanda If you mean the title then it's Philosopher's Stone (the original) for the UK etc. and then Sorcerer's Stone for the US. I'm sure there are probably some other words along the way in the book which are changed too for the language barrier.


http://divaliciouzbookreviews.blogspo...


Hannah Amy wrote: "If you mean the title then 'The Sorcerer's Stone' refers to the American edition of the book. For US copies, they replaced the word 'Philosopher' with 'Sorcerer', apparently (according to Google) a..."

why did they do that ???


message 15: by Mia (new) - rated it 5 stars

Mia Sorcerer is American, philosopher is UK


Ciara Sorcerer is the American version, Philosopher is the British version. J.K herself says Philosopher, but maybe in American interviews she says Sorcerer?


Denis Pedersen Perhaps someone should explain that Philosopher is British and ... oh wait 100 different people did that already :P


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

i don't get it, a philosopher and a sorcerer aren't the same thing at all!! i never understood the change, also does the content change? like the insults that are really english (git etc) and the years system in the school....that stayed the same right?


Micaela I have always been confused about the fact that in america at least a philosopher and a sorcerer are not the same thing at all. A philosopher is someone who thinks deeply and stuff, a sorcerer is some one who does magic. Is the definition of a philosopher different in the UK?


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

Nope, the impression that i got was the stone was owned by a very wise man...not a magician! it is as if they believed the American audience would not understand the word so they changed it. Clearly who ever suggested sorcerer had no clue as to what a philosopher was and also underestimated the American readers.


Louisa Steph wrote: "i don't get it, a philosopher and a sorcerer aren't the same thing at all!! i never understood the change, also does the content change? like the insults that are really english (git etc) and the y..."

usually just the titles change. For example 'the northan lights' changed to ' the golden compass' for americans because they weren't sure if Americans would know what the northan lights are. But the content would be the same, i think.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Did the northern lights/golden compass have anything to do with either the northern lights or a golden compass?...just out of interest (not read them)


message 23: by Hazel (last edited Apr 04, 2012 05:10AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Hazel the reason that its called the Philosophers Stone in the UK, is that the philosophers stone is actually a long sought after mythical item that real live alchemists, including Newton, searched for. According to legend the philosophers stone was able to either create red sulphur, or the elixir of life. Red sulphur was said to be an agent of transmutation of base metals into other metals, most often into gold.

The elixir of life is self explanatory, and is described in the Potter books.

So the reason the original name of the book is the philosophers stone is because the name reflected something that alchemists have been trying to find for centuries in the real world... well up until alchemy became a pointless study.

Having had people from America question, as in this thread, why the name is different, and assume that its something to do with definitions, reflects the reason that the name was changed for an american audience, ie the legend of the philosophers stone is simply not as well known over there.

The stone within the book was not something that Rowling made up, she used a real world legend as the basis for her story:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosop...

Its not about the difference between definitions of philosopher, as the definition is the same in the Uk as it is in the US. Its about the cultural differences in the legends that the two nations have knowledge of.


Micaela Louizzza wrote: "Steph wrote: "i don't get it, a philosopher and a sorcerer aren't the same thing at all!! i never understood the change, also does the content change? like the insults that are really english (git ..."

One, I love your profile pic!
Two, why do they always underesstimate americans now I feel affened.


Louisa Steph wrote: "Did the northern lights/golden compass have anything to do with either the northern lights or a golden compass?...just out of interest (not read them)"

Has very much to do with both!


Louisa Micaela wrote: "Louizzza wrote: "Steph wrote: "i don't get it, a philosopher and a sorcerer aren't the same thing at all!! i never understood the change, also does the content change? like the insults that are rea..."

One-Thanks
Two- It's not my personal opinion just what I heard behind the reasoning. I didn't know it was called that in the US until the movie came out and I was pissed cause it should be called the nothern lights :P


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

I guess what your saying makes sense but i don't understand why the readers would have questioned it, wouldn't it have just been accepted. maybe they could have lookd it up and learnt something new! There seems to be more confused people this way with two different titles than if they had left it.

Am pleased that the english phrases in the book have been left, somebody earlier suggested they had been changed, but i read lots of american books where they use americanisms and i just deal with it. they add alot to the story!


Louisa Authors have different publishers in different countries so the US publisher may have made them change the title based on what they think would sell better. I doubt they think much about the confused people :p


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

lol, no apprently not...still think they are underestimating their readers, treating americans as thickies who can't work stuff out for themselves.


message 30: by Mick (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mick Sakowski I remember reading long ago that the US publisher changed the name to Sorcerer's Stone because they were afraid people wouldn't understand what the book was about, and felt that the name change would make it much clearer that the book was about magic. They believed that most Americans wouldn't understand what the Philosopher's Stone was, and would think the book was about philosophy, turning off their target audience.


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Mick wrote: "I remember reading long ago that the US publisher changed the name to Sorcerer's Stone because they were afraid people wouldn't understand what the book was about, and felt that the name change wou..."

I'm not having a go at what you said it makes sense, but the thought of a book in the childrens section with a picture of a young boy on the front holding a wand, possibly being about philosophy makes me chuckle a little.


message 32: by Tom (new)

Tom Rowe I read this book, and there was no pottery in it anywhere. They should have changed the name to "Harry Jameson" for the American audience. I really expected more of the clay arts from the title.


message 33: by [deleted user] (last edited Apr 05, 2012 02:36PM) (new)

Tom wrote: "I read this book, and there was no pottery in it anywhere. They should have changed the name to "Harry Jameson" for the American audience. I really expected more of the clay arts from the title."

That could have been about irish whisky...wouldn't be suitable for children then!


Atlantic Gem Philosopher's stone=UK
Sorcerer's Stone=US


message 36: by Kirby (new) - added it

Kirby Tom wrote: "I read this book, and there was no pottery in it anywhere. They should have changed the name to "Harry Jameson" for the American audience. I really expected more of the clay arts from the title."

lol


Ascel Kadhem http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13...

Guys it's rowling's new book...


Ashley Ascel wrote: "http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13...

Guys it's rowling's new book..."

lol


๑ஜ๑ Jαѕмιиє ๑ஜ๑ Ascel wrote: "http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13...

Guys it's rowling's new book..."


Anyone know what it's about??


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Nope. Never heard of it before till now.


๑ஜ๑ Jαѕмιиє ๑ஜ๑ Just read this: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/...
Even though we know hardly anything about it, I'm still super excited :D Anything from J.K. Rowling will be awesome :D


message 45: by Kirby (new) - added it

Kirby how long has it been since she's published a book? and is this her first non-HP book?


๑ஜ๑ Jαѕмιиє ๑ஜ๑ Yeah this is her first non-HP book :)
I think it's been 5yrs since she's last published a book


Zkw617 Micaela wrote: "Louizzza wrote: "Steph wrote: "i don't get it, a philosopher and a sorcerer aren't the same thing at all!! i never understood the change, also does the content change? like the insults that are rea..."

Micaela, check your spelling. Affened? Did you mean offended? And you spell underestimate with one s. This is why we are underestimated.


message 48: by Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) (last edited Apr 10, 2012 08:23AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Actually they're very similar Micaela. Yes to us they're different professions. But maybe to the UK they're the same!


Hazel msg 23, I explained the philosophers stone.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) ๑ஜ๑ Jαѕмιиє ๑ஜ๑ wrote: "Yeah this is her first non-HP book :)
I think it's been 5yrs since she's last published a book"


Wow. Has anyone read her new book yet?


« previous 1
back to top