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Beyond Boundaries: The New Neuroscience of Connecting Brains with Machines and How It Will Change Our Lives
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2011 > BSP 79: Miguel Nicolelis author of Beyond Boundaries

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Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
If all goes well I will interview Miguel Nicolelis later this week. We will talk about Beyond Boundaries: The New Neuroscience of Connecting Brains with Machines---and How It Will Change Our Lives . The interview wil be posted later this month as Episode 78 of the Brain Science Podcast.


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
Unfortunately, Dr. Nicolelis has had to postpone his interview on 3 different occasions, which is why BSP 78 did not come out in October as planned.

I have decided to record a brief discussion of his book and I will let you know when this is available.

I still hope to interview him someday soon.


message 3: by Ginger (last edited Nov 04, 2011 08:33AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
I have posted BSP 78, which is a brief discussion of Beyond Boundaries.

You can post feedback in the new thread.

If you want to submit questions for Dr. Nicolelis post them here.

http://www.brainsciencepodcast.com/bsp/brain-machine-interfaces-bsp-78.html


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
I am scheduled to interview Dr. Nicolelis on Friday, November 11 so all questions need to be submitted by 8 AM Central Time on November 11, 2011.


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
This interview has been recorded and I hope to post BSP 79 next Friday, December 2,


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
BSP 79 is now online.

Please post your comments here.


message 7: by Henry (new)

Henry | 7 comments I read Dr. Nicolelis book before I heard BSP 79. I enjoyed your interview. I'm still not sure how brain machine interface will work and be economical for mass market. Diseases such Parkinson's can be treated with stem cells and delivered by nano robots, which will be a cure rather than via BMI. In regard to a remote control via brain waves, I assume non-invasive brain, how can a brain focus on the remote action without being distracted. For example, during a task (i.e. lifting heavy load) brain gets distracted, what happen to the action that is being performed? I assume that fail safe enhancements will require development to circumvent any malicious thoughts that brain can project or distracted. I see a limited use of BMi.


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
Henry wrote: "I read Dr. Nicolelis book before I heard BSP 79. I enjoyed your interview. I'm still not sure how brain machine interface will work and be economical for mass market. Diseases such Parkinson's c..."

Obviously any technique that requires electrodes on or in the brain will have limited application. That's why I find the theoretical implications of Dr. Nicolelis' work to be much more interesting.


message 9: by Henry (new)

Henry | 7 comments Ginger i agree. Demonstrating working brain-machine interface was a great achievement by Dr. Nicolelis and his team. It's opens many possibile applications, including better use of prostheses, self help for bedridden patients, etc..


message 10: by Bruce (new)

Bruce Burdick | 1 comments Dear Dr. Campbell,

Dear Ginger, Thank you for the brain science podcast and your interview with Miguel Nicolelis. I particularly liked the part that we can extend our sense of self. The monkey extended his sense of self when he could move the robot arm in Japan when he was at Duke University in the U.S. I wonder if meditators like Matthieu Ricard are extending their sense of self when they meditate on compassion and the Metta Meditation. I understand their left pre-frontal cortex (the area associated with joy and compassion) becomes enlarged with their meditation.

Might we one day have a goal to extend our sense of self to include all our relatives? (Since we are all descended from a single cell – might one day our sense of self include every cell and ever living organism?)

Currently (with luck and effort and absence of anorexia) we care mostly for our own cells – but might one day we all incorporate all of humanity into our sense of self? We would, perhaps, then be like the Delai Lama?

I like Honeybee Democracy, a book by Cornell Professor thomas Seeley who says a honeybee swarm is a superorganism composed of honeybees, and a human being is a superorganism composed of cells. Each honeybee acts as if his sense of self has been expanded to include the whole swarm, and each of our cells acts as if its sense of self has been expanded to include our whole being.

Might we consider human society a superorganism composed of people, and we each might strive to extend our sense of self to include all of society?

Perhaps you might one day intervidew Thomas Seeley about his thoughts on how a honeybee swarm decides on a new hive site much like the neurons in a monkey's brain decides whether a group of dots on a computer screen are in general moving to the left or right. .

http://www.newswise.com/articles/bee-...

In his book Honeybee Democracy I like his thought that a honeybee swarm is a superorganism composed of bees, the human body is a superorganism composed of cells, and one might say human society is a superorganism composed of people. One might hope people might one day evolve to care for each other as well as bees care for each other. One might hope people might one day evolve to care for each other as well as their cells care for each other.

I also like his thought that we can learn from how honeybees make decisions. Honeybees keep an "open mind" even to the last day before they decide on a particular hive site. Might people and committees one day keep a more open mind before jumping to conclusions?

Thank you for the Brain Science Podcast,


Bruce

P.S. Here is the part of the transcript of MIguel Nicolelis's interview describing the monkey extending his sense of self.

http://www.brainsciencepodcast.com/st...

We can show now that functions are not localized in a single area of the brain—particularly in the cortex—that there is a whole different gestalt to how these things get processed, and how information is processed in the brain. So, behaviors are the result of the collaboration of widely distributed activity through many cortical and supercortical structures and loops.

And we actually can see the limits of plasticity (that you have mentioned in several shows before as one of the key foundations of this new neuroscience that is emerging): the fact that the brain is never stable, but is continuously learning and adapting itself to new events, changes in our body, internal and external changes, and also changes in the environment; that plasticity doesn’t limit itself to the physical limits of the body; that actually our brains are capable of
assimilating any tools—artificial instruments—that we build, as an extension of our sense of self.

We actually are becoming an expression of the type of technology that we create. So, our brains not only create this technology, but they make it sure that whatever works—whatever tool that is capable of augmenting our reach— becomes assimilated as an extension of the internal brain model of our self.

Bruce's thought: Since every person in society can become a source of information for us - (sort of like one of our touch receptors) might we come to see every person as a part of our sense of self? Might this help us seek a sustainable society (like our body is sustainable) where every person has enough to eat (just like every cell in our body has enough to eat) and every person does what he can to help others (just like every cell in our body acts to help the other cells be successful in helping your body survive) just like every honeybee in a honeybee swarm works to make honey, or lay eggs, or find the best hive site - so that the honeybee swarm can survive.


Ginger Campbell (GingerCampbell) | 313 comments Mod
Bruce wrote: "Dear Dr. Campbell,

Dear Ginger, Thank you for the brain science podcast and your interview with Miguel Nicolelis. I particularly liked the part that we can extend our sense of self. The monkey ..."


Bruce,

I really like the way you have expanded on the honeybee idea at the end your post. It certainly is a different way of looking at our relationship with each other.


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