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Vanity Fair
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Archived 2011 Group Reads > Vanity Fair 19: Chapters 64 - 67

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Deana (ablotial) Hi everyone! I guess the mods are busy and a few of us noticed that we don't have an official thread for the end of the book yet! Loretta asked me to go ahead and post it, so here it is!

But sadly I won't be participating quite yet, as I'm still two weeks behind. I aim to finish this by the end of the month, though so I can watch the movie with everyone. Can't wait to check back later and see what everyone thinks :)


message 2: by Juliette (last edited Aug 21, 2011 07:32AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Juliette I'd like to know what everyone else thinks about Becky and her decision to help Dobbin and Amelia, by telling Amelia the truth about George. I thought it was the only unselfish thing she did in the entire book and I'm not sure why she did it. I thought at first that she had learned something and was going to become a different person, but then she turned right back to her old ways with poor Jos.


Shea Thoughts on this section:
Chapter 64: I ABSOLUTELY LOVED when Thacheray compares Becky to a sea monster. It was too perfect. I was glad that Lady Jane continues to shut Becky down in all her scheming. Becky continues to be cruel to Rawdy but he considers Jane his "mother" so he seems to have a good head on his shoulders. I was surprised that Becky seemed to show some heart since she misses Rawdon but perhaps it is just because she doesn't have anyone to push around. I was trying to decide if Becky had resorted to prostitution. Did anyone else get that from this chapter?
Chapter 65: Jos falls hook, line and sinker for all the lies Becky tells him but it serves him right. Dobbin continues to be a favorite of mine as he is not fooled by Becky even as Amelia's heart softens towards her.
Chapter 66: Becky also has great lies to tell Amelia. I was entertained that all the while she fed Amelia her sob story she was afraid Amelia would sit down on the bottle of liquor she had hidden. I thought the closing quote describing Dobbin and Amelia was also perfect "Good-bye, Colonel--God bless you, honest William!--Farewell, dear Amelia--Grow green again, tender little parasite, round the rugged old oak to which you cling!"
So happy to have finished it, overall I enjoyed it, probably would not read it again.


message 4: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob Juliette wrote: "I'd like to know what everyone else thinks about Becky and her decision to help Dobbin and Amelia, by telling Amelia the truth about George. I thought it was the only unselfish thing she did in th..."

I finished the book about a month ago and have been eagerly awaiting the opportunity to discuss the ending. At first I thought Becky was being uncharacteristically unselfish. After finding out how she behaved subsequently, however, I concluded that she did it to get Amelia out of the way so that she could work her will on Jos.

My overall final impression of the characters: They are all caught up, in their different ways, in the meshes of Vanity Fair - all except Dobbin and Becky, who stand at opposite poles, outside the Fair. They alone are able to evade the influences of Vanity that control all the other characters, and thus to behave as autonomous beings - Dobbin, because he's a saint . . . Becky, because she's a psychopath.


message 5: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob Shea wrote: "I was trying to decide if Becky had resorted to prostitution. "

I vote yes.


Juliette Bob wrote:"I concluded that she did it to get Amelia out of the way so that she could work her will on Jos. "

I like that explanation, that whole incident confused the heck out of me where Becky was concerned. Now I feel better.

Bob wrote: "They are all caught up, in their different ways, in the meshes of Vanity Fair - all except Dobbin and Becky, who stand at opposite poles, outside the Fair. They alone are able to evade the influences of Vanity that control all the other characters, and thus to behave as autonomous beings - Dobbin, because he's a saint . . . Becky, because she's a psychopath."

I'm not so sure Becky is untouched by Vanity Fair, perhaps while she's in the story itself she's in control, but when the author alludes to what she went through while she was out of our "reading" sight, it seems like Vanity Fair had a grand old time with her (especially with her getting turned out of hotels because other women complained to the management). Maybe that's just it though. While she's in the story directly, Becky is not under the influence of Vanity Fair, but in the time that she disappears from the story she is.


Juliette Bob wrote: "Shea wrote: "I was trying to decide if Becky had resorted to prostitution. "

I vote yes."


I second (or third).


message 8: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob Juliette wrote: "I'm not so sure Becky is untouched by Vanity Fair . . . it seems like Vanity Fair had a grand old time with her (especially with her getting turned out of hotels because other women complained to the management)."

I didn't mean that she's totally in control of her life, more that she's less confused, less caught up in illusions, than the other characters. E.g., Amelia has the illusion of Osborne's virtue, Mr. Osborne has the illusion of Amelia's father's perfidy, Jos has a whole smorgasbord of illusions, and so forth. Becky doesn't seem to have any illusions preventing her from seeing what's really going on around her. But unlike Dobbin, who's also (relatively) free of illusions, Becky's freedom doesn't lead to virtue - it just makes her more effective at being evil.



message 9: by Ellen (last edited Aug 22, 2011 09:20PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Thanks, Deana, for posting the thread.

I found the ending of the book a bit jarring. It's fitting when you think about it - because they all got Vanity Fair "karma" for lack of a better word.

Still, I felt Thackeray's tone turned dark suddenly. During the rest of the book, Thackeray seemed to take all the selfishness and scheming rather lightly and with amusement. Even though I found it somehow fitting that Amelia and Dobbin were not the kind of happily ever after I expected, I still would have expected a more amused attitude from Thackeray. Same thing with Becky. She seemed pathetic, not like she had totally landed on her feet, the way I thought she should have been, given the framework of the rest of the story. That's why I was so eager to hear what others thought of the ending.

A few other notes: I agree Becky told Amelia about George to get Jos.

I don't know that she was a streetwalker kind of prostitute but it was pretty clear she was some kind of escort for pay.


Juliette Bob wrote:
I didn't mean that she's totally in control of her life, more that she's less confused, less caught up in illusions, than the other characters. E.g., Amelia has the illusion of Osborne's virtue, Mr. Osborne has the illusion of Amelia's father's perfidy, Jos has a whole smorgasbord of illusions, and so forth. Becky doesn't seem to have any illusions preventing her from seeing what's really going on around her. But unlike Dobbin, who's also (relatively) free of illusions, Becky's freedom doesn't lead to virtue - it just makes her more effective at being evil.


Ah! I get it now.


Catherine (catsmeeow) Ellen wrote: "I don't know that she was a streetwalker kind of prostitute but it was pretty clear she was some kind of escort for pay"

Yeah, I think that Becky was with men for money somehow anyway.

I thought the ending kinda made sense. Everything kind of cycled back to how the story began with Amelia in a better position offering charity and protection to Becky. Then Amelia got the happy ending and Becky...got the scheming, money-making, ruining of other's lives ending.

I guess it kind of made sense that Becky only wanted to tell Amelia about George to get Jos, but wouldn't bringing Dobbin back into Amelia's life cause even more of a block to Jos since Dobbin obviously sees through her ways? Whereas without Dobbin, Amelia and Jos both fall under the spell of Becky.


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Juliette,

Those are really good points. As far as Jos is concerned, he seemed pretty smitten with Becky and since she was the only one to butter up his ego, I have a feeling he would not listen to bad words about her. But that's a lot of surmising.

You're probably right about the ending. What startled me was that Amelia and Dobbin were not totally happy together. But maybe Thackeray felt they were about as happy as anyone would or could be together.


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Oops, my last comment should have been directed to Catherine (of course, Juliette makes good points, too.)


Catherine (catsmeeow) Ellen wrote: "Oops, my last comment should have been directed to Catherine (of course, Juliette makes good points, too.)"

Oops, thanks Ellen! Yeah I pretty much agree with everything. That Jos wouldn't really listen to any bad things said about Becky. I guess part of me was just thinking that maybe she did this one good thing for Amelia out of goodness instead of just scheming? Since bringing Dobbin back into Amelia's life would be more likely to mess things up for Becky than to help her. Pretty far-fetched for Becky to have kind motives if you consider her actions the rest of the book but oh well haha.

I'm excited to watch the movie now that we're finally done the book though!


message 15: by Liz (last edited Aug 27, 2011 03:00PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Liz I finished! I actually finished!!! I didn't think that was ever going to happen, but I refused to look at any other books until I'd pushed through this one.

Shea, I agree about Thackeray comparing Becky to a sea monster. It was so fitting. She was really a selfish character throughout the entire book with the exception of helping Amelia & William out in the end. Then again, others have said that perhaps that was to get Amelia out of the way, so she could have Jos to herself? I'm not sure if I agree with that or not. I got the impression that Becky was, in a sense, trying to protect Amelia from the horrible influence of the nasty men who started coming around the house (she wouldn't leave Amelia alone in a room with them), & she knew that Dobbin was a great man (something she finally admitted after she'd sneakily listened to Dobbin tell Amelia he was done with her). Perhaps she was also tired of George receiving so much glory & reverence from Amelia when she knew he didn't deserve it. Perhaps, even though Becky can survive the world & scheme her way into so much, she saw that Amelia wouldn't survive on her own. I felt like she was showing even a little goodness to save Amelia from an unnecessary pathetic fate.


message 16: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Shea wrote: "Chapter 65: Jos falls hook, line and sinker for all the lies Becky tells him ..."

Back to the very beginning of the book; we have come full circle in Becky trying to snare Jos. But somehow once again he manages to get away with marrying her.


message 17: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Bob wrote: "At first I thought Becky was being uncharacteristically unselfish. After finding out how she behaved subsequently, however, I concluded that she did it to get Amelia out of the way so that she could work her will on Jos. "

I read it this way, too. To the very end she is incapable of a single altruistic thought, let alone act. She is pure, unadulterated selfishness throughout.

Which fits with the idea of the puppet motif, doesn't it? Puppets are incapable of emotional development. So, it seems to me, are Thackeray's characters. Do any of them really have character development from the early chapters to the late chapters? Dobbin has a brief spurt of trying to deny his love for Amelia, but it's only brief and unsuccessful. Amelia throughout remains devoted to a concept of a man; when George finally falls from his pedestal, she promptly puts Dobbin up on one. She is incapable of living without relying on the adoration of a man to give shape to her life.

Really, did any of the characters go through any significant character development? If so, I missed it.


message 18: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Catherine wrote: "Ellen wrote: "I don't know that she was a streetwalker kind of prostitute but it was pretty clear she was some kind of escort for pay"

Yeah, I think that Becky was with men for money somehow anywa..."


Not that I want to defend her, but how else was a penniless single woman with no family to live any sort of comfortable life in that day and age? She was a disaster as a governess; can you see her as a chambermaid, or companion to some sour old woman? Realistically, what options did she have other than to live a life of ungenteel poverty?

She disgusts me, but I think I do understand her.


Juliette Everyman wrote:

"Back to the very beginning of the book; we have come full circle in Becky trying to snare Jos. But somehow once again he manages to get away with marrying her."


Was it clear that she was a widow? I thought he couldn't because technically she was still married to Rawdon at first.


message 20: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Juliette wrote: "Everyman wrote:

"Back to the very beginning of the book; we have come full circle in Becky trying to snare Jos. But somehow once again he manages to get away with marrying her."

Was it clear th..."


Well, we are told that Rawdon died of yellow fever, but not when; but when he went out we were warned that people in his position died fairly early. But it's a fair point; I should better have said that once again he manages to get away without her having ensnared him. There were other ways than marriage for Becky to get her claws on wealthy men's money!


Deana (ablotial) I finally finished this book last night! I thought the ending was rather fitting.

Regarding Becky's "uncharacteristic" act of bringing Amelia and Dobbin together, I'm not sure it was -only- to get to Jos, though that may have been part of it. I'm sure she was also quite sick of having to pretend to enjoy Amelia's company, quite sick of having to protect her "friend" from those men, and perhaps most sick of all of hearing about how wonderful George Osborne was when she knew better.

Why she didn't pull that letter out sooner to piss off Amelia is beyond me. I guess she was just waiting for the right moment where it would benefit her (Becky) the most.

I was pretty satisfied with the ending, though I'll admit I was sure that when Dobbin left it would be for good. I was -almost- disappointed that he came back. I kind of wish he'd stood his ground -- Amelia's behavior toward him over the years was pretty awful.

Definitely not a book I'll ever read again, but I'm glad I read it and can understand references to it now.


message 22: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Deana wrote: "I was pretty satisfied with the ending, though I'll admit I was sure that when Dobbin left it would be for good. I was -almost- disappointed that he came back. "

I think that would have been a more likely ending if the book had been written 100 years later. For Victorian readers, that wouldn't have been acceptable, though I agree with you that it would have been more fitting.


message 23: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob I guess I'm a Victorian reader - I was relieved when he came back.

On another point, I'm curious to know if others were shocked, as I was, at Rebecca's cold-blooded torture-murder of Joseph. I realize that there was no good reason for me to be surprised, but I was, nonetheless, shocked at the way her psychopathic personality was displayed so nakedly.


message 24: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Bob wrote: "On another point, I'm curious to know if others were shocked, as I was, at Rebecca's cold-blooded torture-murder of Joseph."

I didn't read it as murder, but that he died of sickness. "He never saw Jos more. Three months afterwards Joseph Sedley died at Aix-la-Chapelle. It was found that all his property had been muddled away in speculations, and was represented by valueless shares in different bubble companies. All his available assets were the two thousand pounds for which his life was insured, and which were left equally between his beloved "sister Amelia, wife of, &c., and his friend and invaluable attendant during sickness, Rebecca, wife of Lieutenant-Colonel Rawdon Crawley, C.B.," who was appointed administratrix."

Do others think that Thackeray implies that Becky didn't wait for nature to take its course, but did away with him herself? Even I, who am certainly an anti-Becky-ite, haven't thought she was THAT evil. Am I not reading carefully enough between the lines?


Deana (ablotial) I did think he implied Becky did something to Jos. Perhaps gave him "medicine" or maybe was just neglectful. But I did think it was implied that it was at least partially her doing. He only invited Dobbin over when he knew she would be out of the house. She nurtured Jos through "unheard of" illnesses (perhaps she made them up?). It said twice he was terrified of her, though he also sang her praises. And when they talked about him going off to India, he said he would as long as it was kept secret because "she would kill him" if she found out. Perhaps a figure of speech, but with the other mentions of him being terrified, who knows for sure?


message 26: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob Deana wrote: "I did think he implied Becky did something to Jos. Perhaps gave him "medicine" or maybe was just neglectful. But I did think it was implied that it was at least partially her doing. He only invite..."

Also, "Mrs. Rawdon Crawley's name was never mentioned by either family. There were reasons why all should be silent regarding her. . . . The Colonel's lawyers informed him that his brother-in-law had effected a heavy insurance upon his life . . . ." which as we know was 50% payable to Becky. Later, when Becky submits her claim, the insurance company lawyer calls it "the blackest case that ever had come before him."

The insurance company's attitude confirms to me that Becky is pursuing a deliberate plan. First, on the "wealth" front, she gets hold of Jos' money. "'All my money is placed out most advantageously. Mrs. Crawley - that - is - I mean - it is laid out to be best interest.'" In fact, it is invested in "shares in different bubble companies". I have to assume Becky is somehow able to loot these companies, or simply steal the money. Although this is not explicitly stated, I can't imagine her simply frittering the money away in bad investments without obtaining any benefit from it.

Meanwhile, on the "health" front, she apparently does to Jos what Mrs. Bute Crawley (without ever admitting it to herself) almost succeeded in doing to old Miss Crawley in Chapter 19. While "tend[ing] him through a series of unheard-of illnesses," Becky enables - and I would guess in some manner connives to bring about - a situation in which "his infirmities were daily increasing". By the time Dobbin comes to see him, Jos has reached "a condition of pitiable infirmity." And Jos has some clue what is going on: "When the Colonel went to see him, Jos "begged him to come . . . when they could meet alone" and pleads with Dobbin to move back to Brussels so that he can be visited occasionally by someone other than Becky.

The part that I found confusing is that Jos is simultaneously "dreadfully afraid of Rebecca" and yet attached to her ("eager in his praises"). I guess it's like so many of Thackeray's characters - Jos seems to be able to tolerate a high level of cognitive dissonance. But I don't see Becky as similarly conflicted. The only way I can read the last chapter, in light of everything that came before, is that she had an end clearly in view and pursued it in her patented manner - deviously but single-mindedly.


message 27: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob Bob wrote: " "Mrs. Rawdon Crawley's name was never mentioned by either family. There were reasons why all should be silent regarding her. . . . "

As I was composing the last post, it occurred to me that what Becky does to Jos really is a kind of echo (sort of a reverse foreshadowing?) of the whole Miss Crawley subplot. It makes me wonder what would have happened between Becky and Miss Crawley if Becky hadn't pissed her off so badly by marrying Rawdon.


message 28: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Bob wrote: "As I was composing the last post, it occurred to me that what Becky does to Jos really is a kind of echo (sort of a reverse foreshadowing?) of the whole Miss Crawley subplot. It makes me wonder what would have happened between Becky and Miss Crawley if Becky hadn't pissed her off so badly by marrying Rawdon. "

I really like that thought.


Deana (ablotial) Good thought in the end, Bob!

And I'm not sure that Jos fully realized the extnt of what she was doing. Perhaps he really did think she was actually helping him, but knew she was CAPABLE of injuring or killing him if he did something to displease her. He may have just thought as long as he didn't specifically do something to piss her off, she would continue to help. Which she did, for some definition of help...


message 30: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob I decided to read the introduction to my penguin edition of the book. The writer very helpfully warns up front that the introduction contains spoilers and should only be read after finishing the book. It's kind of illogical, don't you think, to put these "introductions" at the beginning of books, instead of the end? Anyway, for what it's worth, the writer of this intro believes that Becky did have a rare altruistic moment when she showed Amelia the letter from George - she wasn't acting out of self interest to get her away from jos.


Deana (ablotial) Interesting Bob, thanks for sharing!


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Bob wrote: "Deana wrote: "I did think he implied Becky did something to Jos. Perhaps gave him "medicine" or maybe was just neglectful. But I did think it was implied that it was at least partially her doing. ..."

I completely missed this when I read the book but now that you mention these examples, I think you are right.

As for how Jos could be simultaneously attached to and afraid of Becky, I think she appealed greatly to his vanity. To me, he was the kind of guy who would allow himself to be subjugated to his vanity above all else, even his life.


Katherine (katats) I ended up finishing the book ahead of schedule, but have found all of the comments really interesting. I thought Becky had a hand in the death of Jos, even if it was simply by sucking away his enjoyment of simple pleasures. I found his fear of her unsettling.

I also have a general question for everyone: What was your favorite scene in Vanity Fair? I'm working on a project in which I will display passages of various books, and I feel Vanity Fair deserves a place, but I'm struggling with which page/scene to commemorate. I have a couple favorites, but I would love to hear what has really stuck with people and why.


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Katherine wrote: "I also have a general question for everyone: What was your favorite scene in Vanity Fair?.."

For me, the most vivid, memorable scene was the early one in which Becky threw the book out the window of the carriage, upon leaving the school. So much of the book seemed to be encapsulated in that one gesture.


Denise (momtoconnor) Well, after what seems like forever I finally finished this book...and while the last few chapters did get inteesting and I agree with a lot of your comments I was skimming so much towards the end of the book just to finish it that I definitely missed things! LOL!


Juliette Katherine wrote: "I also have a general question for everyone: What was your favorite scene in Vanity Fair? .."

I would say when Becky is playing Charades.


message 37: by Shea (new) - rated it 3 stars

Shea I think my favorite scene may be when Rawdon finally leaves Becky, mostly because it surprised me so much. I figured she had him all wrapped up.


message 38: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob I really liked the scene where old mr crawley proposed to Becky and she built up to the big announcement that she couldn't do it because she was already married. Becky definitely upstaged everyone throughout the book and had the best scenes. Unfortunately she got less and less appealing as character as time went on. But I still maintain it's a great book.


Deana (ablotial) Shea wrote: "I think my favorite scene may be when Rawdon finally leaves Becky, mostly because it surprised me so much. I figured she had him all wrapped up."

Completely agree with this! His actions toward the Marquis and Becky and leaving were definitely my favorite scene (in the book, not so much the movie, slightly different feel there).

I also liked the marriage proposal scene that Bob mentioned, but I think Rawdon's leaving wins it slightly.


Stephanie i do not think that becky killed jos. i do think that she's manipulated him to death.

I don't know that she was a streetwalker kind of prostitute but it was pretty clear she was some kind of escort for pay.

wasn't she always.

becky never did anything selflessly so i was just waiting for the rest...

glad that little rawdy is all right in the end.

i think that amelia and dobbin got together to show that no one can escape the Vanity Fair...i would agree that Dobbin is on one end of the spectrum, however, it's his myopic love for amelia that sucks him right in.

i would say that becky deserves to be alone in the end, but she isn't is she...as long as there's those 7 deadly sins, we will always have a Vanity Fair.

i am glad that i don't have to think about this book anymore.


Deana (ablotial) Stephanie wrote: "i am glad that i don't have to think about this book anymore. "

Hahahaha YES.

I am glad I read it so I can talk about it knowledgeably in the future but ... wow, it was a hard book to force myself through.

Regarding you first statement, I suppose to me they are basically the same thing. I mean, I guess she didn't ACTIVELY stab him or something, but if it weren't for her I think he would have been alright. She killed him passively, as it were, by neglect and leading him to do things that were harmful to himself.


Andrea I finished the book two months behind but I'm so happy I stuck with it. At time I really struggled with the writing and came to parts were I was either confused by what was being said or felt like I had missed a part and was lost. I just reread that section until it became clear and then kept moving forward with what I could grasp. Most of the book was easy to read and moved along once all the main characters were established.

My initial cheering for Becky faded quickly as I realized she was the queen of master manipulating. I agree with the posts that suggested at some point Becky worked as a prostitute to support herself. Even though it turned out that she was not the best person, the book would have been very dull without her antics. Emmy was a sweet and good character but she would have made for a very dull subject if she was the only lead.


message 43: by Everyman (new) - added it

Everyman | 892 comments Andrea wrote: "Even though it turned out that [Becky] was not the best person, the book would have been very dull without her antics. Emmy was a sweet and good character but she would have made for a very dull subject if she was the only lead.
"


I agree. Nice people are nice to have around in real life, but scheming, manipulative people are fun to read about even though you would (or at least I would) hate to have to live with one.


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments Andrea wrote: "I finished the book two months behind but I'm so happy I stuck with it. At time I really struggled with the writing and came to parts were I was either confused by what was being said or felt like ..."

Good for you for sticking with it! There were lots of parts that confused me, too, but for the most part, I just kept going. I think that really detracted from my overall grasp of the story, though.


message 45: by Bob (new) - rated it 4 stars

Bob I'm very glad that I read it - with the encouragement of this group! I found Thackeray's style unique, unlike any other novelist I can think of. Almost like a Russian, maybe, with the digressions and changes in voice? Not easy to get through, but definitely worth the trouble. The characters and scenes will stay with me for a long time.


Andrea Thank you all for your support and positive comments. I really did enjoy the book. The writing for me was a real issue for some reason. I've read a fair number of classics (including Austen, Bronte, Dostoyevsky, Hugo, Tolstoy, and Wharton) and never did I find the writing such an obtrusive distraction. I'm glad to be done with it and looking forward to our next classic!


Ellen Librarian (EllenLibrarian) | 143 comments I'm a writer, myself (currently blogging) but I've also written fiction and was in a long-running workshop. One of the cardinal rules I was taught was never to have too many characters and make sure their names are not similar. In other words, if you have a Robert, there couldn't be a Roger. This book broke both those rules; there were even characters with the same name!

That said, I'm also very glad to have read the book. I enjoyed the writer's wit and even Becky Sharp (though, like everyone else, I'm sure I'd hate her in real life). I can understand why she has been such an enduring figure in literature.


message 48: by Shea (new) - rated it 3 stars

Shea Andrea, I am glad you were finally able to finish it. I don't think I ever would have if I had not joined this group read. I had started it nearly a year before I finished it with the group...grueling. It has NEVER taken me that long to read a book. I am not sure how to post a pat on the back but I think anyone who has trouble reading a book but buckles down and presses on deserves one.


Andrea Another great reason why book groups make reading better!


Deana (ablotial) I agree wholeheartedly - I doubt I would have finished this book if I were reading it on my own, but having everyone's comments and insights made it worth completing. And in the end it wasn't soooooo bad, but yeah, the writing style was off putting, and the book could have been much shorter and still had the same story.


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