Young Adult Fiction for Adults discussion

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Recommendations > YA for Adults Book Club recommendations

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message 1: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Hernandez | 4 comments I am a library assistant at a public library and will be starting a "Not just for Teens" book club for patrons that will meet once per month in the fall. Has anyone attended anything like this at their local libraries? If so, what books worked well for discussion? If not, what books would you like to see offered at a book club of this nature, if your library had one?
Thanks!!


message 2: by Sandy (new)

Sandy (scribingshadows) I've never attended anything like this but am I right in guessing your looking for YA on the mature side of the spectrum?


message 3: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Hernandez | 4 comments As long as it has something that inherently appeals to adults (ie. has mature themes, complex story lines, tackles sensitive topics, etc.).Things that are currently super popular with teens would also be something I am interested in (ie. The Hunger Games), as a big selling point to the group will be that it is a way for parents to connect with their teens. I want to offer books that are newer and therefore less likely to have been read by adult YA fans previously.


Heidi (Yup. Still here.) I would go with anything by Melina Marchetta - my favorite is On the Jellicoe Road. I also think The Hunger Games, The Book Thief, If I Stay would all work.


message 5: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Hernandez | 4 comments Thank you for those recommendations. I will definitely check out On the Jellicoe Road! The Book Thief is one of my favorites, but I'm not sure if the length might be off-putting for the group. Acceptable length of the chosen books is certainly something we will discuss at our first meeting. It would be a shame to leave out such a unique and touching book in this genre just because it is a couple hundred pages longer than the average YA book.


Cassi aka Snow White Haggard | 2261 comments The Book Thief was long? I listened to it on audiobook and I don't think it seemed long at all.

A lot of YA books are longer than they used to be. I would be careful to limit selection based on length. Especially because page count is not an exact science depending on font, illustrations (some good modern YA books have these) etc.

Gonna check out my read list for more suggestions. I agree with Heidi though, Melina Marchetta is like YA gold.


Cassi aka Snow White Haggard | 2261 comments The Book Thief was long? I listened to it on audiobook and I don't think it seemed long at all.

A lot of YA books are longer than they used to be. I would be careful to limit selection based on length. Especially because page count is not an exact science depending on font, illustrations (some good modern YA books have these) etc.

Gonna check out my read list for more suggestions. I agree with Heidi though, Melina Marchetta is like YA gold.


message 8: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Hernandez | 4 comments The Book Thief is 550 pages (which can be considered long by some, although I enjoyed the book so much I thought it felt much shorter as well). I like your comment about font and illustrations changing page count...good point! Keep those suggestions coming everybody, I really appreciate it!


Cassi aka Snow White Haggard | 2261 comments Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King is really good.

I would stalk some lists from the Printz award to find books.

John Green is really good for example: Looking for Alaska by John Green .

Unwind (Unwind, #1) by Neal Shusterman could lead to interesting discussions. (Though if you are doing a dystopians Hunger Games first!)

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie is one of my favorite books, it's often challenged but I found it enriching.

I'm not how you feel about different genres. I've heard it argued many times that YA itself is not a genre. There is a lot of good YA that is fantasy, steampunk and dystopian.

I'm not sure what your looking at but these are some suggestions.


message 10: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (melissa_wy) | 112 comments I don't know if I stated this already...but Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire is an amazing YA for Adults kinda book! The characters are in college and the love story is amazingly crazy/beautiful...highly recommend!!


message 11: by Sandy (new)

Sandy (scribingshadows) I haven't read this Dystopian yet but my friends and many others have regarded this as their favourite book of the year (so far). Enclave by Ann Aguirre

I really enjoyed Wither by Lauren DeStefano, I thought it was a beautifully written dystopian.

White Cat by Holly Black came out last year and its a real smart paranormal read.

The Tension of Opposites by Kristina McBride a book that realistically deals with a dark subject but because of the POV its not too heavy and it leaves you with a hopeful feel.

Ashfall by Mike Mullin doesn't comes out until October but that was a really good read as well.


message 12: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (melissa_wy) | 112 comments Sandy wrote: "I haven't read this Dystopian yet but my friends and many others have regarded this as their favourite book of the year (so far). Enclave by Ann Aguirre

I really enjoyed Wither by Lauren DeStefano..."


Enclave was OUTSTANDING!!


message 13: by Heidi (Yup. Still here.) (last edited Jul 15, 2011 02:37PM) (new)

Heidi (Yup. Still here.) I would also recommend The Girl Who Chased the Moon by Sarah Addison Allen Chasing Brooklyn  by Lisa Schroeder Bloody Jack Being an Account of the Curious Adventures of Mary "Jacky" Faber, Ship's Boy (Bloody Jack, #1) by L.A. Meyer and second the Vera Dietz nomination.


message 14: by Paula (last edited Jul 15, 2011 04:43PM) (new)

Paula Williams (daystealer) | 43 comments I suggest my recent reads Ship Breaker (Ship Breaker, #1) by Paolo Bacigalupi Leviathan (Leviathan, #1) by Scott Westerfeld Behemoth (Leviathan, #2) by Scott Westerfeld and certainly Ender's Game (Ender's Saga, #1) by Orson Scott Card and whose sequels are definitely on the adult side. Ender's Shadow (Shadow Series, #1) by Orson Scott Card . I also liked Pathfinder (Serpent World, #1) by Orson Scott Card by Card.
Also loved White Cat (Curse Workers, #1) by Holly Black and Red Glove (Curse Workers, #2) by Holly Black


message 15: by Ted (new)

Ted Hill (tedhill) Since the vampire craze is all the rage, I enjoyed the two-book series Peeps and The Last Days because they offer a very different take on the blood sucking lifestyle. The latter is really cool because of the music aspect.


message 16: by Paula (new)

Paula Williams (daystealer) | 43 comments Ted wrote: "Since the vampire craze is all the rage, I enjoyed the two-book series Peeps and The Last Days because they offer a very different take on the blood sucking lifestyle. Th..."

I agree -- I think he has the best version of vampires in lit today.


message 17: by Heather (new)

Heather (hmpotts724) | 4 comments I highly recommend these:
Filter The Von Strassenberg Saga (Volume 1) by Gwenn Wright
So, so good! It's got sort of a gothic novel-like feel to it. =) New favorite of mine.
The Vespertine (The Vespertine, #1) by Saundra Mitchell I loved this book. Written in a very Victorian voice without being cumbersome and silly.
Nevermore (Nevermore, #1) by Kelly Creagh At the risk of sounding like a ditzy fan, I just loved this book...totally completely...can't wait until Enshadowed comes out!
The Greyfriar (Vampire Empire, #1) by Clay Griffith This is technically an adult literature book, however, it's just a technicality and so much fun! =) As my wonderful friend who recommended it to me said, "It's like "Robin Hood" meets "Beauty & the Beast" meets steampunk meets vampires" I loved it.


Yvonne (The Shadow Realm) (vonnie20) | 15 comments I loved Beautiful Disaster. The story was so amazing beautiful and i laughed and cried throughout the entire book. The main characters are in college and are 18-20 so it's defo for older readers.

I also loved Reason to Breathe. It has some dark themes in it but it is beautifully written, the characters are incredible and the ending nearly broke my heart. Highly recommend it!


message 19: by Theo (last edited Jul 18, 2011 07:13AM) (new)

Theo I'd also recommend looking into nonfiction too. There's some great stuff filled with interesting information out there. Like Charles and Emma The Darwins' Leap of Faith by Deborah Heiligman , which could open up interesting conversations about the continued debate that surrounds religion and science.

If it is a book group to help adults connect with their teens, graphic novels should also be looked at, as they are extremely popular. I'd suggest American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang because it's a quick read filled with a lot to discuss about prejudice and identity.

I'd second The Book Thief by Markus Zusak Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie


message 20: by Janet (new)

Janet | 80 comments If I Stay, as it's only about the experience about dying, might be too personal for a public library group.

A lot of the books recommended here I enjoyed, but wouldn't necessarily know what to come up with for group discussion questions, personally. (These include: L. A. Meyer's Bloody Jack series, Westerfeld Leviathan and Behemoth, Enclave by Ann Aguirre).

Here are a few recommendations from 2010 and 2011 where there is plenty to talk about (our blog reviews linked here):

Highest recommendation: Shine by Lauren Myracle

Also highly recommended:
The Other Side of Dark by Sarah Smith

In the Arms of Stone Angels by Jordan Dane (a nice one for parent/child participation, b/c parents might be fans of Jordan Dane's adult mysteries and be interested in her YA debut).

Five Flavors of Dumb by Antony John -- a good no paranormal, relatively equal gender appeal novel

Darkness Becomes Her by Kelly Keaton - lighter fare, for the urban fantasy crowd, but still with more to talk about than the average vampire/werewolf chick lit.


Cassi aka Snow White Haggard | 2261 comments Forever Young Adult blog is trying to start up a book club & they're first book is going to be Beauty Queens by Libba Bray which I really loved but I would suggest mainly for a predominately female group because thats who I think the target audience is.

You could always try to see what their book club is up to and see what you can hijack since you have similar missions (though I imagine yours involves less silliness & no cocktails)


message 22: by Jody (new)

Jody Kihara (jodykihara) | 169 comments I second The Hunger Games as IMO it's 'almost' adult, so it would be a perfect intro for adults who haven't been reading YA; even the book's marketers are aiming it at an adult as well as a YA audience.
I also second Life As We Knew It - whew, what a page-turner!


message 23: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (shgmclicious) I was also going to suggest Libba Bray's Beauty Queens. I think adults might find it interesting because it deals with so many teen stereotypes and identity issues.


message 24: by Amanda (new)

Amanda I suggest The Forest of Hands and Teeth (The Forest of Hands and Teeth, #1) by Carrie Ryan and Shiver (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #1) by Maggie Stiefvater Linger (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #2) by Maggie Stiefvater Forever (Wolves of Mercy Falls, #3) by Maggie Stiefvater


message 25: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Craig (kevincraig) I suggest this book: The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab

I think all ages would love The Near Witch. The writing is beautiful and the story is riveting.


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