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The Three Musketeers (The D'Artagnan Romances, #1)
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Alexandre Dumas Collection > Three Musketeers Discussion: Chpts 31-End SPOILERS

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message 1: by Trisha (new) - added it

Trisha | 492 comments Post discussions here for the last half of the novel!


Jenny (jennyc89) So did anyone else continue reading The Three Musketeers? I'm at 75% and I hope to be done soon. I'm enjoying the book but I get antsy when it takes me too long to finish anything.


Annina | 121 comments I have read The Three Musketeers years ago. I remember that it was good, but some parts was way too hard to read.. or maybe the word is boring.. anyway I did read it, but can't really remember what happened.


Barbara (willcaxton) I read it as a teen and loved it - re-read the end several times, and probably wept buckets over it too.


Jenny (jennyc89) I finished last week and I really enjoyed it. I agree Annina, there were a few parts that were extra hard to get through. I wasn't a big fan of the part about M'Lady escaping. The Musketeers together were my favorite part of the book, so I didn't like it when they were not in a bunch of chapters. I think I might have actually liked the first half of the book better than the end, is that weird? I think it's because I loved the camaraderie between the Musketeers before the plot really started going.


Connor (connork) | 12 comments I cried my heart out at the end. I read it last year.


Frank (frankensteph) | 2 comments I loved every second of this book. It led me to read every Dumas book I could get my hands on.


message 8: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
I really need to move Twenty Years After up on my TBR list. I really enjoyed The Three Musketeers but haven't taken the time to read the other books in the series. Too many good books to read and not enough time.


message 9: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Frank wrote: "I loved every second of this book. It led me to read every Dumas book I could get my hands on."

So do you suggest that I just go with the next several in this series first, or do you suggest trying some other titles by Dumas before finishing the entire series?


Frank (frankensteph) | 2 comments Kathy wrote: "Frank wrote: "I loved every second of this book. It led me to read every Dumas book I could get my hands on."

So do you suggest that I just go with the next several in this series first, or do you..."


You know, I couldn't remember if I read them all in a row or not, so I went back and looked. I did not read them all in order, and don't know if I would if I had a chance to do it again. If you look at my read books, and sort by author, you will see his books i have read, and know that i have thoroughly enjoyed each one. Some standouts were Camille, The Black Tulip, Chicot the Jester, The Borgias, and of course The Count Of Monte Cristo. The D'Artagnan series is probably my favorite series though. I know there are lots of books to read, but all of these books are sure bets for a good, good read .


message 11: by Phil (new) - rated it 5 stars

Phil Jensen | 627 comments Frank wrote: "Kathy wrote: "Frank wrote: "I loved every second of this book. It led me to read every Dumas book I could get my hands on."

So do you suggest that I just go with the next several in this series fi..."


I'm really curious about The Black Tulip. Apparently, that's the one time Dumas addresses race in his fiction. I'm curious to see how he would handle something personal and serious as opposed to the total popcorniness of Musketeers.


message 12: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Phil wrote: "Frank wrote: "...I'm really curious about The Black Tulip. Apparently, that's the one time Dumas addresses race in his fiction. I'm curious to see how he would handle something personal and serious as opposed to the total popcorniness of Musketeers. ..."

I am intrigued by that book also. Perhaps we should nominate it for our next up group read, or a buddy read later?


message 13: by Loretta (new)

Loretta | 2668 comments Kathy wrote: "Phil wrote: "Frank wrote: "...I'm really curious about The Black Tulip. Apparently, that's the one time Dumas addresses race in his fiction. I'm curious to see how he would handle something persona..."

This book has been on my radar for a long time. Either the book is nominated or I'd be up for a buddy read too. :)


message 14: by Wend (new) - rated it 4 stars

Wend (wends) | 74 comments Really loved the book, it is so entertaining. Thank you so much to serial reader without you I may not have embarked on reading due to the length of a classic book. A trivial question, there are very many comments about drinking Anjou, or Spanish wine in the book, in the modern age French wine is known as the best, why did they not drink french wine?


Paula W | 552 comments Wend wrote: "Really loved the book, it is so entertaining. Thank you so much to serial reader without you I may not have embarked on reading due to the length of a classic book. A trivial question, there are ve..."

I thought Anjou was French? Wiki says it is.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anjou...


Susie | 751 comments I just finished that chapter!


message 17: by Tasha (last edited Feb 04, 2017 06:28AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tasha I finished earlier this week and I really loved it. I gave it 5 stars. I never thought I would enjoy it so never had an interest in reading it but thanks to this group I tried it and loved it!


Susie | 751 comments Tasha wrote: "I finished earlier this week and I really loved it. I gave it 5 stars. I never thought I would enjoy it so never had an interest in reading it but thanks to this group I tried it and loved it!"

Can't do better than that!


message 19: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Tasha wrote: "I finished earlier this week and I really loved it. I gave it 5 stars. I never thought I would enjoy it so never had an interest in reading it but thanks to this group I tried it and loved it!"

So glad to here that Tasha. I think it is a great fun read.


Tasha I'm reading The Club Dumas right now and it's an interesting book to follow after reading The Three Musketeers.


message 21: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Tasha wrote: "I'm reading The Club Dumas right now and it's an interesting book to follow after reading The Three Musketeers."

Oh that is a fun idea.


Lesserknowngems | 103 comments I really like this, with the exception of how he writes women and mens relation to women. I think this is very strange considering how "modern" he is regaring women in The Count of Monte Cristo (the only other thing I've read by him). At the same time reading the way they turn women to godesses, putting them on a pedistall, yet how quickly they condem them if they don't live up to the pedistall (mostly Athos) reminds me of chivalric romance. Even falling in love with another man's wife was encouraged as loving your own wife was considered crude. I don't know if Dumas is playing this trope straight, or if he is simply making fun of the role women had in chivalric romances, or if I'm seeing something that isn't there...


message 23: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
I never even thought about Dumas writing the women as a satire of the chivalric romances.


Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Kathy wrote: "I never even thought about Dumas writing the women as a satire of the chivalric romances."

It's interesting to see when comparing the way the men, and especially The Musketeers, view women as weak damsels and godesses, compared to the very active roles the women actually have in the text. The Musketeers are very similar to the old chivalric romantic ideals, which really don't fit with the real women in front of them, that they don't want to see. I'm almost setteled with the idea that Dumas don't want us to think The Musketeeres are right in the way they view the world, or at least a lot of the objectification, black and white thinking that are a part of their world. Quite similar to the ideals you find in chivalric romances. The book is growing on me.


siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments Reached 70%

(view spoiler)


siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments The picnic..is awesome...


message 27: by Phil (new) - rated it 5 stars

Phil Jensen | 627 comments siriusedward wrote: "The picnic..is awesome..."

One of my favorite bits. Pointlessly brave and comedically heroic.


Rhedyn  (fernffoulkes) (view spoiler)

I finished it. Good book, not a favorite, mostly because of content, but I can't say no to anything with swords...


Susie | 751 comments Congrats on finishing!


message 30: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Glad you liked it well enough, Rhedyn.


Rhedyn  (fernffoulkes) Susie wrote: "Congrats on finishing!"

Not much credit there! My main problem was probably a book hangover from Les Miserables- I wasn't prepared to read something else so soon!


message 32: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
I can understand that!


message 33: by Lena (new) - rated it 1 star

Lena | 321 comments 54% in. D'Artagnan is stealing a girls mail and writing back pretending to be her boyfriend because he likes/hates/lusts after her.



siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments the 4 musketeers grew on me.I like them .

(view spoiler)


message 35: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
Oh Good.


siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments made for each other..

“Commend me to the cardinal.”
“Commend me to Satan.”
Milady and Rochefort exchanged a smile and separated


message 37: by Lena (new) - rated it 1 star

Lena | 321 comments 57% in. "When I am insulted I do not faint; I avenge myself!"
You know Milady Clarik is the only one I like because I'm willing to accept and respect strong bad girl in a wretched world.


siriusedward (elenaraphael) | 2052 comments thats a nice quote.. I liked that..

but Milady is the Evil genius..mad too


message 39: by Matt (new) - rated it 4 stars

Matt (mmullerm) | 820 comments I just finished chapter 59. Hoping to finish Three Musketeers this evening. Dumas likes dramatic jail breaks doesn't he? Milady's escape is almost as dramatic as Dante's in Count of Monte Cristo!


message 40: by Matt (new) - rated it 4 stars

Matt (mmullerm) | 820 comments 3.5 stars (rounded up to 4) from me. Here is a link to my review in case anyone is interested (light spoilers): https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

I hope everyone enjoys the book and I'm looking forward to reading the discussions.


Robin P | 112 comments Milady's section is the least interesting to me. But the jailer has the name and history of the actual person who killed Buckingham. So Dumas needs to show how brilliantly evil Milady is while also remaining somewhat true to history. Of course the king & queen of France & Richelieu are historical figures too. I'm sure everything isn't historically accurate. But I have learned so much history over the years from novels. I could never mix up Louis XIII and Louis XIV because they have such different roles here.

Louis XIV shows up in the last novels - you have to watch out because parts of the series show up with different names. After 20 Years After, there is a very long book in French called The Vicomte de Bragelonne but in English it's usually broken into 4 novels - 10 Years Later, The Vicompte de Bragelonne, Louise de la Valliere & The Man in the Iron Mask.


message 42: by Robin P (last edited Feb 14, 2017 10:14AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Robin P | 112 comments Dumas was a very prolific writer. He first became famous for his playwriting, also mostly on historical subjects. (A very long time ago I started writing a PhD thesis on Dumas' theater, which I never finished). He wrote all these serials, and also books on travel, cooking and other subjects. He spent all his money on lavish homes and entertaining (and women, I suppose). Later in his career, he had assistants who did some of his writing, somewhat like James Patterson today. He was also a fabulous dinner guest/raconteur. If he had lived more recently, he would have been a writer of made-for-TV movies and a perfect talk-show guest.)


Kathleen | 3804 comments Robin wrote: "Dumas was a very prolific writer. He first became famous for his playwriting, also mostly on historical subjects. (A very long time ago I started writing a PhD thesis on Dumas' theater, which I nev..."

I love this insight, Robin, and love picturing him as dinner and talk show guest, and imagining the made-for-TV movies he would write!


message 44: by Pink (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pink | 6556 comments Finished! I'm glad I persevered with the book, as I wasn't enjoying the beginning. Overall my favourite parts were with Athos, especially when he was confiding in D'Artagnon about his wife and previous life, I really got a sense of his back story in these parts, much more so than with the other musketeers. I enjoyed their adventures, trying to find money, drinking and duelling. I also really liked Milady's character, although I'd kind of prefer to read more about her in her own book. I thought she was treated unfairly by the men, but perhaps Dumas done this on purpose to prove a point about how the musketeers could womanise, lie, cheat and kill in the name of chivalry, whereas the outcome for a female doing the same was to be unsuccessfully hanged and then later bound and beheaded! Or perhaps he just liked the drama and knew this storyline would sell.


Susie | 751 comments Good for you Pink, sticking with it!
Sounds like it was worth it for you...I'm at 90% and closing in... :)


message 46: by Lena (new) - rated it 1 star

Lena | 321 comments 68% in.
If he had just drunk the wine the story would be over now with a happy ending.


message 47: by Andrea AKA Catsos Person (last edited Mar 12, 2017 08:24PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 1791 comments I just completed the part where Athos confronts Milady after she received instructions to see to it Duke of Buckingham is killed.

What is the significance that she is branded with the fleur-de-lis?

What does this brand mean?


Bat-Cat | 1299 comments Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder wrote: "I just completed the part where Athos confronts Milady after she received instructions to see to it Duke of Buckingham is kindle killed.

What is the significance that she is branded with the fleur..."


You will find out as you continue to read. ;-)


Susie | 751 comments Finished! 3 1/2 - 4 stars...
I liked the book...it is a rollicking good story but agree with Sara in the other thread...it is quite frivolous...not much there, there. If you are looking for deeper meaning and such, you won't find it here!

Happy to mark another classic's Classic off my list!


message 50: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 4 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9434 comments Mod
I agree, not too deep, just a fun story.


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