The Kid The Kid discussion


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What is your opinion on the book ending?

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message 1: by Nelia (last edited Jul 12, 2011 07:10PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Nelia I was thrown off with the ending of the book. I wanted to know others opinions of what happened at the end.


Christina Walker I feel I missed something because I felt uneasy and confused at the end. I would've liked more follow up. what happened to his friends, girlfriends. I am not even completely certain how he got there. Did he cut his wrists and then get misidentified as that other Abdul the police were looking for?


Suzie The ending was totally disappointing and confusing. What even happened? I'm not one that is easily offended or needs a happy ending but this book was a disappointment. I wonder if she left it like that so that she can write yet another book... I wouldn't read it, if she does.


Friendlyfire All I wanted to do was get to the end, because I am committed to finishing what I started. I have read the last few pages several times and I am still not sure about the ending. I just keep going "WTF happened." I feel I missed something, no I missed a lot of somethings in all those dream state vs. reality portions of the book. I am so disasppointed in this book and Shappire.


Sheryl I also was a bit confussed by the ending, it seemed to me that he had assaulted this child, was caught doing it by his friends, and then slit his wrists and ended up in this awful mental hospital. But the thing with the name mix up and the other Abdul, made no sense to me and if he had attacked this child, why did they release him? Or was the part about attacking the kid just in his head and he slit his wrists because he was having those thoughts?


message 6: by S (new) - rated it 2 stars

S I was very confused by the ending. I really didn't like the novel. I really thought overall that the novel could have been written much better. If she's trying to make this a series she can forget it. As the kids say now "Failed".


Rashid Darden My theory:

He went down to social security to get his documents "fixed" - remember he kept saying he didn't understand why his father's name was the same as his mother's father's name?

That segment ended abruptly and we find him in the hospital.

I think he had a nervous breakdown or other mental snap. He MAY have touched the little boy at the party, but I don't think he did.

He lost it and pretended to be the other Abdul because he felt he would be safe at the hospital (recall the kindly doctor who took care of Precious, the doctors who helped him after he was raped, and the nurse and doctor who stitched him up after the mirror incident).

I don't think he KNEW consciously that he would be safe there, but did what he had to do to end up there because it's the only security he ever had.

The pharmaceutical stuff.... I truly don't know or understand. But I'd like to believe that he found a way out to a new life. Maybe.


Shavonne Confusing and incomplete which seems to be the general consensus


Sheryl In response to Rashid's comment I wonder if when he when he was getting his documents fixed he came to the conclusion that his mother and father were actually related and he was a child of incest. Perhaps this caused him to snap. Just grasping at straws as I continue to try and figure the ending out.


Deneen A. Connor This book was our September's Book Club read. We all found this book to be very disturbing. I was confused the "whole" book.

I am trying to remember the ending (I refuse to go back and re-read it), I know he was in the hospital talking with a doctor who I believe is going to let him out. Thats what I remember right now. I am with everyone else ... confused!!


Diana I could not wait to finish this book, it was the most disgusting book I have ever read. Anyway, the ending confused me as well, I was like, so did he touch the little boy and did he kill his girlfriend's parents or what? Then the doctor lets him go knowing he is a danger to others, he will most likely touch someone else's son or cousin, and he will prob. rape and kill other men because he has some serious mental issues. My opinion is Sapphire mentally exhausted herself writing this book and when it came time for an ending she just said "whatever" and was done with it. Precious worked too hard to have her son live that kind of life.


Diana Suzie wrote: "The ending was totally disappointing and confusing. What even happened? I'm not one that is easily offended or needs a happy ending but this book was a disappointment. I wonder if she left it like ..."

I agree, I am done with her books. I feel like she writes for shock value to compare with Precious.


message 13: by S (last edited Oct 10, 2011 02:50PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

S The ending was not clear and confusing to me. It never really gave the true ending of what happened. No closure. If there is a part two I won't be reading it.


Deneen A. Connor Shawnte wrote: "The ending was not clear and confusing to me. It never really gave the true ending of what happened. No closure. If there is a part two I won't be reading it."


I won't be reading it either.


Jamie I respected the discombobulated the ending. I think that developmentally Abdul went from being an abused child, to hallucinating perpetrator, to 13-17 year old sex slave and then found himself in something that could be described as a positive community (being a part of something bigger- the dance company). Abdul was so focused on just surviving that there was no time or safe place to examine his past or present.

When he was finally in a place that was not full of danger he was able to start correlating how similar he, himself was to his own abusers. I think that he was staring into the face of the priest’s every time he looked in the mirror and feared (along with feelings of shame and guilt) his wicked potential.

I thought him ending in a mental hospital was perfect- I didn’t understand how he kept it together that long without some sort of episode. To me, this represented the total break of a human with the possibility of starting from the bottom and rebuilding who he was, is and will be. I don’t think I would have wanted to book to end neat and pretty. Abdul’s story is far from over.


Rashid Darden ^^^ Well said.


Diana Jamie wrote: "I respected the discombobulated the ending. I think that developmentally Abdul went from being an abused child, to hallucinating perpetrator, to 13-17 year old sex slave and then found himself in ..."

I agree that he needed to be in a mental facility but what kind of doctor would let him just walk back out on the streets knowing his mental capacity, and knowing that he will more than likely rape another little boy..


Jamie Diana- how I had read it was that he was back in a psychosis similar to the ones that he had as a child & had a delusion that he may have raped another child. I didn't take it that he had actually committed the crime and instead had a total mental break due to the trauma of realizing what dark part of him was still available while fighting off psychosis. The goal of mental health facilities is also to get the person well enough to be back out in society (and he never divulged the info about the sexual history to the doctor, right?). And here is where Abdul's story begins.


Jamie Thanks! And, Rashid, I will now have to check out your books. :)


Diana Jamie wrote: "Diana- how I had read it was that he was back in a psychosis similar to the ones that he had as a child & had a delusion that he may have raped another child. I didn't take it that he had actually..."

Well, he does tell the doctor about the kids he raped at the school, because he lies about the ages and says one was six when he was actually four. I figured that he didn't rape the boy in the end but he had the mental capacity to do it to someone else. Also, he tells the doctor about the men he beats up after they offer to pay him for sex Maybe... and this is a strong maybe, I would read more about him just to see where he ends up. I guess we all took something different from the book, which is good in a way.


message 21: by Ann (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ann The end was confusing for me....I still can't figure out if he had been dreaming in psychiatric care all along or if he really lived some of this....any thoughts?


message 22: by Azem (new) - rated it 5 stars

Azem The story goes a bit crazy towards the end. Actually, while reading this book, I got the impression that the author was just plucking things out of the air to shock and then try to weave some kind of narrative around it. It didn't work for me. What made Push so harrowing and touching is that it is credible. we know that this the real world.

The Kid does not have that. Too far fetched. (he becomes a ballet dancer??)


Rashid Darden I don't find becoming a dancer to be far-fetched in the context of this story.


Latifa The story left us in the complex emotions of Abdul. The ending was not created to be a concise and clear. The ending was intended make the readers as confused as Abdul is. I think many readers are angry at the sad and disgusting trail of events that Abdul endured, and enraged they read the story of a future pedophile. We don't understand what happened to Abdul, because he cannot relive the blurry events happening near the end of the book. Since he is the narrator and cannot remember everything during his mental break his stories are confusing. His mental state was shaky throughout the whole book, and the reason for stay at the facility. And he did not complete his aspirations to become a dancer, those dreams failed along with his mind. Not too far fetched, just as depressing as the rest of the book, but well written.


Reilly I couldn't get to the ending. I think I made it to page 25. Maybe 15. Either way, not my book.


message 26: by Sherry (new)

Sherry Ann I read Push several times and had really thought it was a good book. I do not think that this book is as good as Push. To be honest I am not even sure what happened in the end because it was pretty ambiguous.


Suzanne Gibney Maybe because I read Push and The Kid back to back, I have a different impression in my head of the narrative, and what I think was true, which was either intentional or Sapphire is so pretentious she can write all this stuff without bothering to check continuity.

Abdul knew he was a product of incest. He's always known. It's on his birth certificate, which he's had the whole time. Throughout The Kid he keeps talking about how his father is 'unknown' on his certificate, which is bullshit, because in Push Precious flat out says to the people present at his and his sister's birth, that their father is her father, Carl Jones. She puts his name on both certificates.

After Precious dies, he is given an envelope with his birth certificate in it. He doesn't pay attention to it, he's only 9. Then he gets it when he leaves to go live with his great-grandmother. He says (whilst droning on and on) that his birth certificate is in the envelope, so he surely looked at it. Then his great-grandmother practically tells him that Carl was with his grandmother (I think she said something like he came round 'courting' and she didn't want her to end up with him because he was a waste of space)

And Abdul is supposed to be so smart but he couldn't figure that out? Really? He knew, he just ignored it and made up some fantasy parents like he did with everything else.

To be honest I think he made up the whole 'Herd' ballet troupe. he ran away from his great-grandmother after her looooong story about herself, with the flippant remark that confirmed his father was also his grandfather hidden inside it, lived with Roman for a while, left him, mooched around on the streets selling himself and kicking the shit out of pervs he didn't like until I think maybe he killed one eventually, gets arrested and is taken to an asylum. He still can't admit the reality and clings to the fantasy, and stubbornly insists everything is a dream and he didn't do anything wrong. His name really is Aziz-Ali, up until then it didn't matter what name was used, it always had 'Jones' at the end but when he figured out he was a product of incest he got rid of that name and made up a new one.

Him being released at the end is just another fantasy, I doubt 'Dr See' is real and he won't be getting out ever. He is going to die.

One thing that makes me think this is when one of the attendants say he is 'going to fry' and I thought at first he meant the electric shock treatments, although that is a phrase used for someone going to the electric chair, even though nowadays its lethal injection. Then I remembered that the death penalty wasn't abolished in New York until 2008, and in Push it states Abdul was born in 1988 making him 20 yrs old. Technically this makes him a minor when he committed the crime but you can be executed over the age of 21 if you commit a crime under 21... I think it all depends what you did. Plus there is the fact that legally he is dead (or was, the social worker, who was so proud of herself for finding this out, never got round to actually saying whether she fixed the error or not), and he is living under an assumed name, so they probably don't know how old he is but again, depending on what he did they might not care.

Thats if you believe the last half of the book is mainly bullshit and he did actually do something and he is in a mental hospital. Its the only thing that made sense to me and would explain (sort of) the whole crap about his multiple names and ambiguity of his age to any sort of satisfactory conclusion. I decided on this ending because to be honest the book was exhausting and bored me to tears so I had to make it up into something worth reading.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

have to disagree with people who are particularly against this book. Sapphire brought life to a human, to someone with flaws and demons far worse than most and child's play compared to others.
Abduls story is not meant to be a fairy tale but an honest depiction of someones life its. The author has managed to challenge our perception of our own lives. Could you imagine yourself in his position. Would you make different decisions?

The honest answer would be "I am human and do not know what my response would be"


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