A Wrinkle in Time (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet, #1) A Wrinkle in Time discussion


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message 1: by Gabrielle (last edited Jul 08, 2011 01:25PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Gabrielle Did anyone like this book?
Im in the middle of reading it!!!!!
Its kinda wierd!!!!!


Megan Baxter I love all of the Murray series of L'Engle's books! What do you find weird about it?


Geoffrey It is my favorite children`s book, tied with the Wheel on the SchoolHouse by DeJong.
A classic by any means. Not weird at all.


Charlotte Waller No, I did not like it. Then again, I read it as an adult so maybe if read in childhood I would have liked it. I just did not think the story was that compelling.


Carita Loved it!


message 6: by Binx (new) - added it

Binx Gray I agree with Megan, loved all the Murray books.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

One of my all-time favorites...


Chisom loved it 2! wonderful book and planning 2 read it again :D


Scott Loved it when I was in fourth grade. Didn't like it so much as an adult. I wish I hadn't re-read it.


Ricky Stafford I've always loved this book. It is a little strange but I love it just the same. I loved the whole series. This is probably my favorite book.


message 12: by Jo (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jo Liked it a lot.


Torie Did I LIKE it?!!!?
I LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! One of my all-time favorite books!!!


Gabrielle I thought it was a great book!!!!!!!!


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) ME TOO! IT IS AWESOME!


Lacey Reah I loved this book


Maree I loved this book as a child, but upon going back and reading it as an adult, I thought Meg was kind of whiny.


Gabrielle Like i said it was a great book... :)


message 23: by Kayla (new) - rated it 1 star

Kayla Not at all.


message 25: by Kayla (new) - rated it 1 star

Kayla I didn't like the book at all.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) How come? It is so wonderful!!


message 27: by Kayla (new) - rated it 1 star

Kayla Wellll, I had to read it for school and it was just..too weird for me!


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Well, just because you read it for a school project doesn't have to make it weird for you!


message 29: by Kimber (last edited Jul 18, 2011 02:32PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kimber Lyn wrote: "I have to say that I must be one of the few people who disliked this book. My main issue is that it is anti-multicultural. It promotes that different is weird, and I strongly dislike the main char..."

It promotes that different is weird? The entire book is about how they travel to another time/place in order to defeat an enemy who forces everyone to be exactly the same. This book celebrates the fact that being unique...and even a bit odd...can be a truly wonderful thing.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Yeah. I agree. And what anti-multicultural thing? What are you talking about?


message 31: by Emily (last edited Jul 18, 2011 06:27PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Emily If you're new to science fiction or fantasy, it can be a little weird, difficult to wrap your head around. I read all of the Murray series as a young adult, and revisit them from time to time. I like that the main characters in "A Wrinkle in Time" are fighting against the Darkness, a battle that extends beyond the pages of the book. Mrs. Who, Mrs. Whatsit and Mrs. Which remind us that people such as Jesus, Leonardo de Vinci, Gandhi, Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Einstein, and Madame Curie have also fought Earth's Darkness. Who is fighting Earth's darkness today, and, am I one of them?


message 32: by Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) (last edited Jul 18, 2011 02:56PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) I know! That's my favorite part.


Kathleen Thank you for your cogent remarks, Emily, I couldn't agree with you more - and I love your challenging questions, though I'd be hesitant to answer definitively - especially in this forum. That said, are you finding, nowadays, that a good majority of readers (at least in these forums) confine themselves to the surface or 'entertainment' level of the read and are, perhaps, ill-equipped to consider other (deeper) layers or 'themes' - i.e., 'fighting Earth's darkness'?


Emily Kathleen wrote: "Thank you for your cogent remarks, Emily, I couldn't agree with you more - and I love your challenging questions, though I'd be hesitant to answer definitively - especially in this forum. That said..."

Actually, I joined yesterday, so I'm not too familiar with the conversations in these forums yet. A good book, for me, will challenge me to be better than I was before. I have great hopes that these discussions will aid in that as well.


Karen It is one of my all time favorites!! Great book! Keep reading.


Msadventure Kathleen wrote: "Thank you for your cogent remarks, Emily, I couldn't agree with you more - and I love your challenging questions, though I'd be hesitant to answer definitively - especially in this forum. That said..."

Kaleigh wrote: "I know! That's my favorite part."

I agree. Having read this in elementary school, it gave me permission (and validation) in being one of the "uncool, geeky, smart" kids who believed in fighting the Darkness in whatever forms it took, i.e., playground teasing, racism, etc. As for Meg's whininess, I think that as adults, we're taught to "just suck it up and deal with it" but I remember thinking that maybe my life wasn't so bad since I only had one little brother to have to look after. :)

No, I'm not so attached to it or the rest of the series as an adult as I was as a child but then I've (hopefully) matured since then and so have my literary tastes. Not away from science fiction, Heaven forbid, but to a more adult style of writing. Please note that I did not say to more adult concepts. The underlying ideas in this book are as cogent and mind/soul-wrestling as many books for adult readers and more so than most books.


Gabrielle i thought the book was great!!!!!!!!! i thought it was a little wierd but i still loved it


Kathleen Msadventure wrote: "Kathleen wrote: "Thank you for your cogent remarks, Emily, I couldn't agree with you more - and I love your challenging questions, though I'd be hesitant to answer definitively - especially in this..."

Amen, Msadventure - nice 'handle', by the way...


Kathleen Emily wrote: "Kathleen wrote: "Thank you for your cogent remarks, Emily, I couldn't agree with you more - and I love your challenging questions, though I'd be hesitant to answer definitively - especially in this..."

I've been a member for several months and what I have found is that many participants seem to be most interested in the 'entertainment' value of the book, i.e., titillation, movie potential, author gossip, etc., and not particularly inclined to discuss deeper meaning or 'layers'...admittedly, much modern 'popular' fiction seems to be 'devoid' of 'layers' - but the superior work must have them, right? I'm just not sure the people interested in the additional layers are utilizing this particular communication channel...


Geoffrey So go ahead, Kathleen and be our guest. Introduce the "layers" of deeper meaning to this discussion.


Kathleen Oh dear - I meant no disrespect - and the last thing I want to do is to sound condescending or any such thing. AMOF, I think Emily did a great job introducing the key 'layer' (theme) - namely 'fighting the darkness'. To delve deeper, it might be interesting to cite examples of the kinds of things the author seems to associate with this 'darkness' - things like conformity and bureaucracy, which are presented so ominously on Camazotz. Did the imagery of Camazotz remind anyone of places or conditions in our world today? And what does Meg use to overcome the darkness? What kinds of lessons did she have to learn before she was capable of defeating IT? What about the writer's skill and style appealed to people? I think Ml'E is one of the best authors when it comes to transporting the reader to a different place and time. Didn't her description of tessering make you feel like you were actually tessering along with Meg? What do people think about the concept of tessering? What do you think about the author's infusion of real science in her fantastic adventures?


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Well, that's the point. It wasn't right that they were all "equal". And that's not what equal means. Equal doesn't mean that we all have to be alike. That's what the author was trying to point out.


Kathleen Lyn wrote: "Kaleigh wrote: "Well, that's the point. It wasn't right that they were all "equal". And that's not what equal means. Equal doesn't mean that we all have to be alike. That's what the author was tryi..."

Ohhhh, Lyn...I'm sorry you seem to be feeling ganged-up-on...I don't think that was the intent at all. There's room for dissenting opinions in any discussion. But, if I may, I think part of the reason we engage in the discussion - even when it gets a bit 'heated' - is so we can learn - no matter how old we are...we enter the wondrous process of human discourse with hopes that 'a light from the shadows shall spring'...our response to what we read is indeed very personal and subjective. And sometimes, because of our own limited experience, or our myopia, the meaning of the words or intent of the author remains in shadow for us until someone with more or different experience shares the light of their understanding - hopefully, dispelling the shadow for you as well. I would humbly submit that when many, many experienced and educated fellow book lovers share identical understandings of the meaning of a read - it might be worthwhile for you to read the work one more time, with an eye for what so many have shared. You might be surprised by what you discover when you take the time to read something a second time around, armed with new awareness or at least open to new possibilities. Also, there are many websites from many and varied sources that can shed more light on this particular author's work. Just google Madeleine l'Engle literary analysis or criticism...'hope that helps just a bit...


message 46: by Okie (new)

Okie I read it as a teen, and had small problems understanding the science involved, but I really enjoyed it.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) Lyn wrote: "Kaleigh wrote: "Well, that's the point. It wasn't right that they were all "equal". And that's not what equal means. Equal doesn't mean that we all have to be alike. That's what the author was tryi..."

Sorry didn't mean to offend.....


Scott Lyn wrote: "That is not what I got. Sorry, that is my opinion. No one is going to change it. I see that when people ask whether or not someone liked a book, they mean that they want everyone to agree. When other points of view are offered, everyone gets in a huff."

No one here has gotten in a huff except you. Kaleigh explained quite reasonably why your interpretation of the book was incorrect (and yes, it is incorrect; it's not a matter of opinion.) No one said you had to like the book.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Scott wrote: "Lyn wrote: "That is not what I got. Sorry, that is my opinion. No one is going to change it. I see that when people ask whether or not someone liked a book, they mean that they want everyone to agr..."

Except now you are getting RIGHT into the middle of it. I am not going to feed you drama as well, Scott. Find another thread to troll.


Kaleigh - Captain Bubbles ESTP(intj) I LOVED IT. :) =) =] :]


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