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message 1: by Betty (last edited Jul 06, 2011 12:34PM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments India, China, Japan, Australia, Philippines, Korea, Pakistan ...

"Asia Literary Review"
http://www.asialiteraryreview.com/web...

"Asian Literature" (Wikipedia)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_li...

Literatures of Asia by Tony Barnstone


message 2: by Betty (last edited Dec 10, 2011 03:33PM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments The World's Literature sections the literary world longitudinally:
(2010) Europe/West Asia/Africa--GREECE;

(2011) South America/Central America/North America--BRAZIL, PERU;

(2012) East Asia/Central Asia/Oceania--[EDIT: JAPAN].

During 2012, the Asian-Pacific regions are East Asia, Central Asia, or Oceania,
Eastern: China, Japan, Korea, Philippines

Central: India, Pakistan

Oceania: Australia, New Zealand
We'll choose one country now from them. When we return to the Asia Pacific in another three years, we'll select the reading from one of the other Asian-Pacific regions, not selected this time.

Also including book titles is helpful.


message 3: by Manu (new)

Manu (manuherb) | 8 comments India will be the country of focus at the 10th Ghana International Book Fair, Accra, November 1-6, 2011.

A delegation of distinguished visiting Indian writers will be led by the prolific poet and novelist Sunil Gangopadhyay, who writes in Bengali. He is the president of the Sahitya Akademi, http://sahitya-akademi.gov.in/sahitya...

The other members of the delegation are Dr. Chitra Mudgal, one of the leading literary figures of modern Hindi literature; Manikuntala Bhattacharya, the Assamese poet, short-story writer and novelist; Dr. C. S. Lakshmi, the Tamil feminist writer and independent researcher in women's studies who writes under the pseudonym Ambai; Vasant Abaji Dahake, the Marathi poet, playwright, short story writer, artist and critic; Dr. L. Hanumanthaiah, Dalit writer, poet and former MLC, noted for his translation of
Valmiki Ramayan from Sanskrit to Kannada and the Bhagavadgita as a poem in English; D. Vinay Chandran, the Malayalam poet; and last but not least Minakshi Sen, novelist and short story writer in Bengali.

The composition of the delegation would seem to demonstrate what a limited view one gets of Indian literature by reading only in English. It will be interesting to hear from these writers how much cross-translation there is from one Indian language to another. If there are any questions which you'd like me to put to them, I'd be pleased to do so.


message 4: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Manu wrote: "India will be the country of focus at the 10th Ghana International Book Fair, Accra, November 1-6, 2011.

A delegation of distinguished visiting Indian writers will be led by the prolific poet and ..."


Very interesting, Manu. I can see now that much of Indian literature originally written in one of India's twenty-two languages or in Rajasthani is untranslated. And, more prevalent to Westerners is Indian English literature, which is already in English but is unrepresentative of all of India. If India becomes the 2012 theme, a mix of the translated and the English is the best.

I'll add the Book Fair to the group events, including some of your information about it.


message 5: by Betty (last edited Nov 08, 2011 07:53AM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments I compiled three lists of Asian literature (India, Japan, China). Check the Poll Comments http://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/56...

The 2011 Man Asian longlist http://www.manasianliteraryprize.org/


message 6: by Manu (new)

Manu (manuherb) | 8 comments Eight distinguished Indian writers spent a week in Accra during the recent 10th Ghana International Book Fair. The Ghana Association of Writers undertook most of the hosting under the leadership of its energetic President Kwasi Gyan-Appenteng. I was given the honour of chairing the first welcome meeting, on the flimsy grounds that I had spent the years 1963-65 in Bombay (as it was then known.) I recognized none of the names of the visitors so I spent a day researching them on the Internet. In the event they brought with them a specially produced glossy booklet with a page devoted to each of them. They had a stand at the Book Fair, at which they displayed books, in various Indian languages and in English translation, all published by the Sahitya Akademi, the Indian National Academy of Letters. (www.sahitya-akademi.gov.in )

The delegation was led by the Bengali writer, Sunil Gangopadhyay, b. 1934, President of the Academy and a prolific poet, story writer, playwright, essayist and novelist who has had over 300 works published since his first volume of poetry in 1960. I selected Sunil Gangopadhyay: A Reader, (ISBN 978-81-260-2354-7) published by the Academy in 2009 as one of the books I planned to purchase but he insisted on presenting me with a copy which he graciously signed. I’ve read some of the poems (If poetry could fill paddy-fields with grain/ I would have written poems in blood/ If poetry could bring showers to parched lands/ I would have squeezed the marrow of my bones/ To compose hymns to rain/ If by writing poems . . .) and a short story so far. Recommended.

The Academy, whose first President was Jawaharlal Nehru, “selects only the best works of fiction, poetry, drama and criticism in different languages for translation . . .(and) gives twenty-four awards annually to literary works and an equal number to literary translations.” It also has awards for Juvenile and Children’s writing. It publishes some 350 volumes a year, a book a day.

I found no English translations of works of our other seven visitors so I selected two slim novels by Rabindranath Tagore, Binodini (1902) (ISBN 81-7201-403-1) and Chaturanga (1915) (ISBN 81-7201-400-7) and a fat Mulk Raj Anand reader (ISBN 81-260-2173-X).

Let me give you a brief introduction to the other writers as an indication of the breadth of contemporary Indian literature. (The classical works of course date back to well before the start of the Christian era.)

Agrahara Krishna Murthy is the secretary of the Academy, a poet and essayist. He writes mainly in his mother tongue Kannada but also has an academic qualification in Tamil.

The glamorous Monikuntala Bhattacharjya (b. 1966) is a prolific writer in Assamese, based in Guwahati (which was called Gauhati when I spent a week there in 1964.) She writes novels, short stories, poetry and film and television scripts. Her most unusual work perhaps is an autobiography in verse. www.monikuntalabhattacharjya.com

Vasant Abaji Dahake writes poetry, novels and criticism in Marathi and has recently been involved in the publication of an innovative illustrated biography of the writer and activist Dr. Babasaheb Abedkar. He told me that his work addresses Marathi speakers and that he feels no need to reach out to an international readership.

Dr. Chitra Mudgal, feminist, trade unionist and social activist, is one of India’s leading novelists in Hindi. Hindi is the first language of some 180 million and the second language of twice as many. www.chitramudgal.info and http://www.amazon.com/wiki/Chitra_Mudgal She spoke to us in Hindi but graciously left me with prints of translations of several of her stories in English.

Vinayachandran D., hails from Kerala and writes in Malayalam. He has to his credit 17 collections of poetry, 4 novels, 6 short story collections and a collection of plays. He has translated Lorca and a number of works by African writers.

The charming Bengali writer, Minakshi Sen Bandyopadhyay, is a Professor of Physiology. She was somewhat reluctant to talk about her youth as a Naxalite revolutionary which led to several years in prison. It gave me great pleasure to print out for her an English translation of a chapter from her prison memoir, Jailer-Bhetor Jail, which I found on the Internet and of which she wasn’t aware. http://anglesanddimensions.wordpress....

Dr. L. Hanumanthaiah has written poetry and plays in Kannada, when not involved in teaching and politics.

It fell to the efficient Deputy Secretary of the Academy, Rakesh Kumar Sharma, to keep things running smoothly throughout the visit.

These few lines cannot begin to do justice to the work of these writers. I doubt whether they will influence your choice of Asian reading matter, but I hope that it will persuade you that writing in English does no more than scratch the surface of contemporary Asian literature.


message 7: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Hi, Manu,

How wonderful that you attended the Ghana International Book Fair and wrote up the highlights of it. I gather that you speak fluent Hindi.

The availability of Binodini: A Novel and Chaturanga; A Novel [Quartet] looks okay. Check out the edited Indian literature list (Poll Comments).

It was also good of you to add Minakshi Sen Bandyopadhyay's memoir chapter.


message 8: by Manu (new)

Manu (manuherb) | 8 comments I lost my few words of pidgin-Hindi many years ago.

Here's another source of Indian writing, the current Harper Collins India catalogue. http://harpercollins.co.in/Catalogue/...

In it you will find this.

Civil Lines 6

The best-known anthology of new writing from India is
back.

Edited by Mukul Kesavan, Kai Friese and Achal Prabhala

Civil Lines went to bed in 2001 and rose nearly a decade later in an unrecognizable world. Rip Van Winkle slept twice as long but woke up less disoriented: time moves faster in googleworld than it did in the Catskills in the late eighteenth century. The best explanation for the elephantine gestation of Civil Lines 6 is the truth, in the words of the editors themselves: unsure of their editorial judgement, they waited for the submissions to pass the test of time. And this is a collection of the pieces that survived.

Mukul Kesavan is a writer based in Delhi; Kai Friese is a magazine editor in Delhi; Achal Prabhala is a writer and researcher in Bangalore.

Ruchir Joshi / Itu Chaudhuri / U.R. Ananthamurthy / Ananya Vajpeyi / Shougat Dasgupta / Gauri Gill / Naresh Fernandes / Nilanjana Roy / Anand Balakrishnan / Binyavanga Wainaina / Rimli Sengutpa / Manu Herbstein / Benjamin Siegel

In case you missed my name in the list of contributors, I really do have a piece in it. I haven't received my author's copy yet but I have no hesitation at all in giving this volume the highest recommendation!


message 9: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Manu wrote: "I lost my few words of pidgin-Hindi many years ago.

Here's another source of Indian writing, the current Harper Collins India catalogue. http://harpercollins.co.in/Catalogue/......"


Wonderful catalogue of Indian books. You might be awaiting an Author's Copy because "Civil Lines 6" itself is still being published!


message 10: by Haaze (last edited Dec 05, 2011 10:12AM) (new)

Haaze | 33 comments Re: Japan

While browsing in my favorite used bookstore this weekend I came across two very interesting books linked to Japan. I just want to bring them to your attention and see if they potentially could interest the group if it embarks upon a Japan theme this coming year. Both of the books are very enticing.

Snow Country Tales: Life in the Other Japan by Bokushi Suzuki
An Amazon reviewer wrote: "This book contains a mixture of natural history, folklore, and slices of daily life in early 19th century Yazawa province. It contains many small stories, some of which cover only one page, on topics such as the life cycle of salmon, asbestos, the shapes of snowflakes, and snowball contests. Very few of the topics sound exciting, but four things keep the book interesting. First, Suzuki Bokushi is a good writer and could make nearly anything worth reading. Second, the stories are two hundred years old and told by a very clever man from the hinterlands of Japan. This puts a twist on many topics. For example, I had never thought (or even wanted to think) about what people in the early 1800s knew about asbestos, but I enjoyed the page and a half on the topic. Third, most of the topics are kept short enough that, in the unlikely case that you truly don't care about something like techniques for catching salmon, you only have to turn the page. Finally, the book includes a number of Bokushi's drawings. Like the stories, these cover a wide range of topics, but they are all very pretty.

Snow Country Tales gives its readers a wonderful view of life in a part of Japan that is probably new even to those who know about Japan. I have purchased three copies of this book. The first one is mine, the second was for my fiancee, and the third was for my mother. I had to get one for her so she would return my copy."



A Daughter of the Samurai by Etsu Inagaki Sugimoto
A reviewer wrote: "...seek it out any way you can. A fascinating, wonderful, and truthful account of the life of a daughter of the Samurai class, which had existed for centuries, just at the time when it was beginning its decline. Much of what you read in this book will explain the behaviour of modern-day Japanese. As an American living in Japan, that has proved invaluable. The book is well-written, focused, imaginative, whimsical, and resourceful, just like the author herself"


message 11: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Haaze wrote: "Re: Japan

While browsing in my favorite used bookstore this weekend I came across two very interesting books linked to Japan. I just want to bring them to your attention and see if they potentiall..."


"Snow Country Tales" by Bokushi Suzuki and "A Daughter of the Samurai" by Etso Inagaki Sugimoto would tell us more about Japan in a way that makes learning enjoyable. thks for suggesting them, Haaze.


message 12: by Haaze (last edited Dec 07, 2011 12:53PM) (new)


message 13: by Betty (last edited Dec 07, 2011 01:35PM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Haaze wrote: "I have always looked for en excuse to dig into The Columbia Anthology Of Modern Japanese Literature and/or The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Literature: From 1945 to the..."

The abridgment (2011), which highlights Volumes 1 and 2 of "The Columbia Anthology of Modern Japanese Literature", might be coming in Kindle and is in paper. I'm keeping an eye on it and look forward to reading it, Haaze.

BTW, I have the set "A History of Japanese Literature" by Donald Keene:

Dawn to the West Dawn to the West: Japanese Literature of the Modern Era; Fiction (A History of Japanese Literature - Volume 3),

World Within Walls: Japanese Literature of the Premodern Era - 1600-1867,

Seeds in the Heart: Japanese Literature from Earliest Times to the Late Sixteenth Century,

Dawn to the West: Japanese Literature of the Modern Era; Poetry, Drama, Criticism.

The books are, like the series says, nonfiction rather than fiction and are a challenge I set for myself for 2012.


message 14: by Haaze (new)

Haaze | 33 comments Yes, Keene's books are sitting on my shelves as well beckoning for my attention..... They are definitely a handful, but seemingly viewed as "classics" worth exploring!


message 15: by Lindu (new)

Lindu Pindu (lindacrisan) | 2 comments While reading this Japanese lit blog, I came across a review that I can use for my graphic-novels promoting agenda :)

The book in question is Tokyo on Foot: Travels in the City's Most Colorful Neighborhoods, and it looks delightful.




Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) Murakami is a given, but I can't read too much of him at once.

One book I'd like to read is Harmony by Project Itoh - science fiction!


message 17: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Lindu wrote: "While reading this Japanese lit blog, I came across a review that I can use for my graphic-novels promoting agenda :)

The book in question is Tokyo on Foot: Travels in the City's Most Color..."


I have perused the blog you mention. If you scroll down the page, the blogger writes about Tokyo on Foot: Travels in the City's Most Colorful Neighborhoods, Snow Country, and graphic novels.


message 19: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Jenny wrote: "Murakami is a given, but I can't read too much of him at once.

One book I'd like to read is Harmony by Project Itoh - science fiction!"


I'm looking forward to the variety we're planning for 2012--fiction, memoir and graphic (Tokyo on Foot), science fiction (Harmony)...


message 20: by Declan (last edited Dec 10, 2011 12:48PM) (new)

Declan I'd like to read a novel by Kobo Abe, The Woman in the Dunes in particular.


message 21: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Declan wrote: "I'd like to read a novel by Kobo Abe, The Woman in the Dunes in particular."

You got it, Declan. I'll note that you recommend it. Thanks.


message 22: by Declan (new)

Declan Thanks Asmah.


message 23: by Haaze (new)

Haaze | 33 comments This looks like a gem: From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry. I fell in love with it as I browsed in the poetry section at my used bookstore. Excellent selections!!


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) The Pillow Book is a classic that I really enjoyed.


message 25: by Betty (last edited Dec 10, 2011 07:39PM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Haaze wrote: "This looks like a gem: From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry. I fell in love with it as I browsed in the poetry section at my used bookstore. Excellent s..."

I added it to the Day-to-Day, Haaze. And, Burton Watson translated it...


message 26: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Jenny wrote: "The Pillow Book is a classic that I really enjoyed."

I have heard people confirm that they like "The Pillow Book", Jenny, and have added it to the Day to Day. This poetic diary by Sei Shonagon as well as "The Tale of Genji" are set in the Heian period (10th century); I gather that Genji is fiction whereas Pillow Book is nonfiction to an extent.


message 27: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Haaze wrote: "This looks like a gem: From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry. I fell in love with it as I browsed in the poetry section at my used bookstore. Excellent s..."

In Japanese mythology, Izanagi and Izanami created the eight great islands of Ancient Japan. Today, Japan has 6852 islands.


message 28: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 19 comments Jenny wrote: "One book I'd like to read is Harmony by Project Itoh - science fiction!"

One of the best science fiction novels in any language from the last decade.

For light novels (the Japanese equivalent of YA), Book Girl and the Suicidal Mime would be a good choice as it's not only entertaining, but the title character, a book-eating goblin, is an expert on Japanese literature and provides lots of information for readers unfamiliar with the subject.

In mainstream fiction, I recommend Kamikaze Girls, which is a lesbian romance involving biker gangs, embroidery, pachinko parlors, and Lolita fashion.

And a survey of Japanese literature wouldn't be complete without a sampling of manga. To show that it isn't just girls in sailor outfits fighting giant robots, I'd go with Kimi ni Todoke, which is currently the best-selling shoujo (girls) manga in both the US and Japan. It's a very sweet slice-of-life story about a girl who's ostracized in school because she looks like the creepy demon girl from The Ring. It'd probably be best to do the first two volumes since they're (A) short and (B) tell a complete story arc.


message 29: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Sean wrote: "Jenny wrote: "One book I'd like to read is Harmony by Project Itoh - science fiction!"

One of the best science fiction novels in any language from the last decade.

For light novels..."


I looked up the recommendations, Sean, and put them in the Day to Day. The link for "Lolita Fashion" took me to Gothic and Lolita, a nonfiction. We need the variety that Japan is publishing.


message 30: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Would it be okay to suggest A Pale View of Hills for June-December in here ?


message 31: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 19 comments I don't think Ishiguro counts as a Japanese novelist -- he moved to Britain when he was six and isn't particularly influenced by Japanese literature. He himself has said, "If I wrote under a pseudonym and got somebody else to pose for my jacket photographs, I'm sure nobody would think of saying, 'This guy reminds me of that Japanese writer.'"


message 32: by Niledaughter (last edited Jan 13, 2012 09:10AM) (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Sean wrote: "I don't think Ishiguro counts as a Japanese novelist -- he moved to Britain when he was six and isn't particularly influenced by Japanese literature. He himself has said, "If I wrote under a pseudo..."

Fine ,I got your point . I only thought of the novel as Migrant Literature .


message 33: by Betty (last edited Jan 13, 2012 10:08AM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Sean wrote: "I don't think Ishiguro counts as a Japanese novelist -- he moved to Britain when he was six and isn't particularly influenced by Japanese literature. He himself has said, "If I wrote under a pseudo..."

Nile daughter wrote: "Would it be okay to suggest A Pale View of Hills for June-December in here ?"

I appreciate your interest in the work and in its author. "A Pale View of Hills" is set in Japan and is written by Ishiguro who is British. The original language of the story is English.

In Around the World in 52 Books, my own, self-imposed rule is that the author and the book's original language has to be from the country, but in The World's Literature, author and/or setting has been the standard.

Criteria for books: Will we learn significantly more about Japan from the story? Has the author done enough research and has s/he gotten enough life experience to produce a credible book about Japan?

To suggest a book is okay. It seems to me that "A Pale View of Hills" meets that criteria. I will include the suggestion in the December day-to-day.

When we select the country for 2013, I'll also create a poll for whether we want author, language, and/or setting to be identical with the country.


message 34: by Betty (last edited Jan 13, 2012 09:59AM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Sean wrote: "...I only thought of the novel as Migrant Literature ...

I'm unfamiliar with Japanese migrating to England. According to Wikipedia, the migration is generally in the context of "mass-migration".


message 35: by Niledaughter (last edited Jan 13, 2012 12:04PM) (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Thanks Asmah , you did not need to add since it is an unfamiliar choice here , I want to read the book , it does not have to be with group , so it would be better to delete it :)

For "Migrant Literature" I did no study the issue so I appreciate the info about the "mass-migration". since as an Arab I read arab immigrants as "Migrant Literature" and did not associate with "mass-migration", so I never though about it this way .


message 36: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments "A Pale View of the Hills" is a story I might also read. To place it among the suggestions will tell others about what might be enjoyable to read to them. I appreciate that you shared the title.

In Brazil/Peru 2011, an excellent epic story of five hundred years about the history of Brazil was/is written by Errol Lincoln Uys. I don't know that there is a historical fiction about that country to compare with it. Uys is not Brazilian.

I don't know of a book that describes "Migrant Literature". A description of that genre is on Wikipedia.


message 37: by Sean (new)

Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 19 comments The key to me is that Ishiguro describes himself as a British writer who happens to have a Japanese heritage. I'd put him in the same class as Naipaul. It just seems to me that Japan itself produces more literature than we can get to in one year.


message 38: by Niledaughter (last edited Jan 13, 2012 12:36PM) (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Asmah wrote: ""A Pale View of the Hills" is a story I might also read. To place it among the suggestions will tell others about what might be enjoyable to read to them. I appreciate that you shared the title.

..."


Thanks Asmah ; that was a good clarification .

I checked the description of "Migrant Literature" on Wikipedia, I see the main focus is related to the "mass-migration" , but still "any experience of migration would qualify an author to be classed under migrant literature " .as I said I experiened that with "arab immigrants Literature " , it can be categorised as "former colonies to Europe" , or "exile literature", yet it can not always fit in an Accurate categorization related to "mass-migration" .

Anther thanks for this interesting discussion!


message 39: by Betty (last edited Jan 13, 2012 04:41PM) (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Nile daughter wrote: "I checked the description of "Migrant Literature" on Wikipedia, I see the main focus is related to the "mass-migration" , but still "any experience of migration would qualify an author to be classed under migrant literature..."

Sean wrote: "The key to me is that Ishiguro describes himself as a British writer who happens to have a Japanese heritage. I'd put him in the same class as Naipaul. It just seems to me that Japan itself produce..."

The Tale of Genji alone might require three months. LOL The author of it is definitely Japanese. Do we need a new topic named Migrant Literature? Yes? No? What would go in it?


message 40: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Asmah wrote: "The Tale of Genji alone might require three months. LOL The author of it is definitely Japanese. Do we need a new topic named Migrant Literature? Yes? No? What would go in it? ..."

"The Tale of Genji " seems so :)

As for new topic named "Migrant Literature", I am not sure if it will be that effective in Japan's case.


message 41: by Niledaughter (last edited Jan 14, 2012 09:55AM) (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Wow ! there is Japanese diaspora and The Japanese in Britain are form the largest Japanese community in Europe with well over 100,000 living all over the United Kingdom

I found this bookJapanese Diasporas: Unsung Pasts, Conflicting Presents and Uncertain Futures, part of the book online in Here

Still , I am not sure if any of this will be important , for me it was enough to know about it .


message 42: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Nile daughter wrote: "Wow ! there is Japanese diaspora and The Japanese in Britain are form the largest Japanese community in Europe with well over 100,000 living all over the United Kingdom

I found this bookJ..."</i>

Pragya, quite a find and in ebook! [book:Japanese Diasporas: Unsung Pasts...
about Japanese immigrating to the United Kingdom and to other parts of the world outside Japan.

Just a note. Wikipedia: "A Pale View of Hills" and "Japanese in the United Kingdom".



message 43: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Sean wrote: "The key to me is that Ishiguro describes himself as a British writer who happens to have a Japanese heritage. I'd put him in the same class as Naipaul. It just seems to me that Japan itself produce..."

Nabokov, too, for me. Read a while ago, a biographical book about his interest in butterflies, Nabokov's Butterflies: Unpublished and Uncollected Writings, or possibly Nabokov's Blues: The Scientific Odyssey of a Literary Genius. Both were published in the 2000s.

As for Japanese fiction, a new sci-fi by Christopher Priest The Islanders is recommended for fans of Haruki Murakami.


message 44: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Asmah wrote: "The Tale of Genji alone might require three months. LOL The author of it is definitely Japanese. Do we need a new topic named Migrant Literature? Yes? No? What would go in it? ..."

Will it be "from June" schedule ?


message 45: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Nile daughter wrote: "The Tale of Genji...Will it be "from June" schedule?..."

If we decide to read The Tale of Genji, then it will be between June and December 2012.


message 46: by Niledaughter (new)

Niledaughter | 35 comments Asmah wrote: "Nile daughter wrote: "The Tale of Genji...Will it be "from June" schedule?..."

If we decide to read The Tale of Genji, then it will be between June and December 2012."


thamks :) hope we will do that ...


message 47: by Lindu (new)

Lindu Pindu (lindacrisan) | 2 comments I only read parts of Genji Monogatari for class, but in 2010 readers got together and made a blog called Summer of Genji, which I found to be very insightful. Might be a good sidekick for our own experience if people choose this novel.


message 48: by Betty (new)

Betty (olderthan18) | 3639 comments Lindu wrote: "I only read parts of Genji Monogatari for class, but in 2010 readers got together and made a blog called Summer of Genji, which I found to be very insightful. Might be a good sidekick for our own e..."

Nile daughter wrote: "... :) hope we will do that..."

The Tale of Genji or Genji Monogatari I became enthused about especially from that Open Letters Monthly/Quarterly Conversation blog "Summer of Genji" I had bookmarked and had purchased the book. There is a lot about the story from the daily blog post from June to August.


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