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Members' Books > DIVINE CITY: dark literary fiction

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message 1: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments I'm trying to develop some frank GoodReads reviews for my new eBook: Divine City: Bangkok Fantasies.

Free downloads of the title are availaible through July 14th from SmashWords. Just enter the coupon code "ZE87C" to download the work for free. There are many eBook formats available.

You may also listen to or download free podcast excerpts of the book at ScottBRobinson.net.

This is a collection of short fantastical tales set in modern Bangkok.

The stories' is an admittedly lyric narrative style. In a way, I hoped to mirror classical Thai art, which to my mind is a predominantly two-dimensional, highly-stylized, highly-ornate art. It also strikes me as an art-form that can moreover transport one to something like a different state of mind and to different worlds.

I do not think the work will appeal to a great number of readers, but I do believe it will at least intrigue a certain few...


message 2: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (patriciasierra) | 2388 comments I don't do reviews, but I did download your book and will PM my views to you after I've taken a look at it.


message 3: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments Patricia Sierra wrote: "I don't do reviews, but I did download your book..."

Thanks kindly, Patricia. I do appreciate it.

I love your personal GoodReads image by the way...


message 4: by Patricia (new)

Patricia (patriciasierra) | 2388 comments Thanks. It's a photo of an antique picture made with gaudy goodies, including real feathers.


message 5: by Andre Jute (new)

Andre Jute (andrejute) | 4851 comments Mod
Don't believe a word of it, Scott. That's Sierra, aided and abetted by a whole suitcase full of Max Factor MoviStar ExtraGloss.


message 6: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments Whichever the case may be...lovely to look upon.


message 7: by J.A. (new)

J.A. Beard (jabeard) Sounds interesting. I'll definitely take a look.


message 8: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments J.a. wrote: "Sounds interesting. I'll definitely take a look."

I'd love to know what you think...it looks like you've got some authors on your book list who are in a similar vein.


message 9: by Ken (last edited Jul 20, 2011 03:51AM) (new)

Ken My two cents: (not talking to you Scott; title of the post just caught my eye) What's with this emerging "dark x" genre? Dark fantasy, horror sci fi, neo-noir, etc. There's enough darkness in REAL LIFE for crying out loud. You don't need to resort to the fantastic to find it. Want to chill your reader to the bone? Write about the entire Dickensian class in the US: knocked-up teenage girls who get kicked out of their house by their holy-roller moms; the urban underclass forced to resort to drugs to making a living wage, since minimum wage sure isn't that; and so on. Think I'm just shilling for the left? Think again! People as mainstream as Eminem regularly address the dismal social conditions for people without college degrees (e.g., "Rock Bottom", to name but one song). What ever happened to social fiction? Who is the heir apparent to Dickens? And why does the class with money to buy 9.99 kindle books only patronize vapid escapist literature?


message 10: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments Personally I always preferred Balzac for social commentary. He has a wit for characterization akin to Dickens I feel, plus a great deal of fantasy to boot. Or also there is Zola, whose social commentary often takes on mythic proportions. Don't get me wrong, I love Dickens. But even he has some pretty "magical" moments...like when what's-his-name from Bleak House spontaneously combusts...

I agree with what you're saying. I think qualifying books as "dark" is really more of a marketing scheme. A realist or naturalist author has as much recourse to the dark-side as any other type.


message 11: by Ken (last edited Jul 20, 2011 12:55PM) (new)

Ken Scott wrote: "Personally I always preferred Balzac for social commentary. He has a wit for characterization akin to Dickens I feel, plus a great deal of fantasy to boot. Or also there is Zola, whose social comme..."

Hey thanks for your reasoned response. I'll have to check out Balzac and Zola. Which book would you suggest?


message 12: by Scott (new)

Scott Robinson (scottbrobinson) | 10 comments Of Zola's works, I've only ever read Germinal, which is about French miners and makes a good companion read with Dicken's similar Hard Times.

Balzac is extremely varied, both in subject matter and quality. Three favorites are Père Goriot, A Harlot High and Low and History of the Thirteen.

Have you got any Dickens favorites?


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