Bodice Ripper Readers Anonymous discussion

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message 1: by Elle (new)

Elle | 72 comments OK, it's been established in other threads that traditional publishers these days have become too PC to publish real, honest-to-Pete BR's, i.e. 1980's Rosemary Rogers, Flame and the Flower, early Karen Robards, etc.  I'm curious what readers think.  Is this a response to the real market; have readers turned away from the non-PC material that was so common in the early 80's?  Or is there still a market that publishers are ignoring?  How much of one? Are there indie authors doing the old school BR justice, and are they making any money at it?


message 2: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn Fletcher (speederina) | 131 comments I think that there is a significant number of people that still enjoy BRs. But the people who dislike them protest louder so many publishers are afraid of the bad publicity that would follow if they started publishing BRs again. Not to mention, a lot of romance books nowadays take no more than a month to write, vs the BRs which probably would have taken longer. A lot of people probably dislike the wait, so they prefer the shorter, less complex romance books of today.


Pamela(AllHoney) (pamelap) I was a real BR fan in the day and while my tastes have grown tame to some degree I'd love to get my hands on a good BR now and then. I go back and reread some oldies on a regular basis. It'd be great to combine elements of the past and present and see what they can come up with....


message 4: by Karla (new)

Karla | 1668 comments Mod
Evelyn wrote: "Not to mention, a lot of romance books nowadays take no more than a month to write"

If this is true, man, does it ever explain a lot!

I agree that there IS an audience out there, but I'm afraid that it's small enough and quiet (considering the prevailing vocal attitude) that the profit would be nil or not worth the effort to pursue it.

I'd love to know if there are any self-pubbed or small press BRs out there.


message 5: by Elle (last edited Jul 05, 2011 04:53PM) (new)

Elle | 72 comments Karla,

You're probably right that those who do enjoy such books are probably not shouting it from the rooftops. In the face of strident, righteous objections, some of them with fair points, few readers are going to rise up and argue that, hey, I like books like that. That said, though, before the righteous objections started, probably about half of the books in the romance section had BR elements, and people ate them up. Did readers change overnight, or did they just not put up a fuss when publishers decided to avoid Ucontroversial material?

Indie publishing is just starting to be a valid alternative to traditional, so authors who don't want to bow to the PC may try their luck. As for controversy, who knows how it actually affects sales? The huge stink in some circles over the witchcraft in Harry Potter probably led a lot of people to buy the books just to find out what the fuss was about. I'm guessing that most of the members of this group would be drawn by the objections to a new BR, right?


message 6: by Evelyn (new)

Evelyn Fletcher (speederina) | 131 comments Elle wrote: "Indie publishing is just starting to be a valid alternative to traditional, so authors who don't want to bow to the PC may try their luck."

I think that indie publishing is now a lot easier because of ebooks. It's much easier to publish an ebook than go through the hassle of paying for printing and distributing paper books.


message 7: by Elle (new)

Elle | 72 comments Yup. I know one writer who made $35k from her last book (2nd of 2). Not quit your day job money, but a lot better than most traditionally published writers do off a 2nd book. I read a blog where a romance writer made the NYT bestseller list and cleared $24k from that book.


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