Mathematics Students discussion

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what is everyone studying?

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message 1: by Puloma (new)

Puloma Dasgupta (puloma_dasgupta) | 2 comments m doing a math major. currently studying abstract algebra, advanced calculus, differential equations, numerical analysis. wt abt all of u?


message 2: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments I just finished my degree, but starting grad school in the fall with Abstract Algebra, Applied Mathematics 1, and Vector Analysis, Linear Algebra, and Differential Forms: A Unification.


message 3: by cantormath (new)

cantormath | 4 comments Mod
Topology, knot theory mostly. Just got done with Skein Module theory in the spring'11. I also receive a pretty good dose of Algebraic Geometry (pain to learn but very important). Nice to meet you all.


message 4: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle I'm still at college currently in the middle of my A levels.


message 5: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments What is an "A level"?


message 6: by Puloma (new)

Puloma Dasgupta (puloma_dasgupta) | 2 comments i haven't reached topology yet. that's for the masters course. but i keep hearing about it...hmm...getting curious! :)
nice to meet everyone!


message 7: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Yeah, I think they do topology at the masters level at my school as well.


message 8: by Ham!d (new)

Ham!d (infinitesimal) | 1 comments I'm currently a math undergraduate. In Fall semester I'll be taking linear algebra, diff. equations, analysis, probability and statistics.


message 9: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Linear algebra is so much fun!


message 10: by cantormath (new)

cantormath | 4 comments Mod
Regardless of your field of study in grad school, I find that Linear Algebra is one of the most used subjects on a regular basis.


message 11: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Yeah, I wind up using Linear Algebra concepts to program the computers at the Physics lab that employs me.


message 12: by Nicolle (new)

Nicolle Adam wrote: "What is an "A level"?"

It is the standard qualification in England (the one after GCSEs but before University).


message 13: by Ronald (new)

Ronald Lett (slider142) | 15 comments Aside from the basics, algebra: linear and abstract, is encountered almost everywhere. =)


message 14: by Fatema (new)

Fatema (fatema7) I'm currently an undergraduate math student. I will be taking topology, Analysis I, and Abstract Algebra II in the fall semester ( only 2 weeks away!)


message 15: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Fatema wrote: "I'm currently an undergraduate math student. I will be taking topology, Analysis I, and Abstract Algebra II in the fall semester ( only 2 weeks away!)"

That's really cool. My school only offered topology once so far and, I think, that was at the grad level. I know Abstract Algebra is taught only at the grad level, that's cool that you get to see it as an undergrad.


message 16: by Fatema (new)

Fatema (fatema7) Adam wrote: "Fatema wrote: "I'm currently an undergraduate math student. I will be taking topology, Analysis I, and Abstract Algebra II in the fall semester ( only 2 weeks away!)"

That's really cool. My schoo..."


Ya, my university is pretty weird like that. Not that I'm complaining. A lot of the students in my classes are grad students, so I'm not sure what classes I would be taking if I were to decide to go to grad school for math, considering I'm taking most of those classes as an undergrad.


message 17: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Depends on where you go. There's loads of stuff in grad school to take usually. Maybe your school has more stuff with Abstract Algebra and Geometry related courses? My school was mostly applications, so we had stuff like Partial Differential Equations available as an Undergrad.


message 18: by Fatema (new)

Fatema (fatema7) Adam wrote: "Depends on where you go. There's loads of stuff in grad school to take usually. Maybe your school has more stuff with Abstract Algebra and Geometry related courses? My school was mostly applicat..."

Ya, probably. So far I'm not sure if math grad school is even in my future, so maybe I'll never have to find out!

Has anyone here taken topology already? I've heard it's pretty hard, and I have no idea what to expect content-wise.


message 19: by Ronald (last edited Aug 22, 2011 01:31PM) (new)

Ronald Lett (slider142) | 15 comments Fatema wrote: "Adam wrote: "Depends on where you go. There's loads of stuff in grad school to take usually. Maybe your school has more stuff with Abstract Algebra and Geometry related courses? My school was mo..."

Topology is not difficult at all, as in it is not complicated to learn. It is all about what types of things stay the same between two related objects when we no longer require them to have the same size/distance between points. Ie., when you see a ring, you know its a ring irrespective of its size, and when you see a rubber band looped in a knot, or kite knots, you also know they are rings. The aim is then to see how we can objectively see that all these objects are indeed rings and what properties unify all of those objects. Ie., what is the objective description of "ring-like object"?
we can then go further and ask "What types of objects are there?" and "How do we know if objects can be physically deformed into each other or not?" and so forth. We also get the notion of holes in spaces affecting integration and other analytical properties of the space including a much better ability to describe the solution spaces of differential equations of all types.
Topology has a ridiculously wide reach of applications, from analysis and graph theory to quantum field theory, number theory and as a lead-in to category theory.
If you want to get a taste of why topology is interesting without too much machinery, have a look at "Experiments in Topology", a very short Dover book. ( http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14... )
If you are a fan of pure mathematics, you will find an excellent grounding in the proper properties of spaces by studying not only the familiar real topology, but various other "might-have-been" or close topologies that are different in very small ways, but make huge differences in analytic results.


message 20: by cantormath (new)

cantormath | 4 comments Mod
@Ronald, nice description and comment.

I am currently studying topology in grad school (knot theory). At the undergrad level you will probably find yourself studying point set topology. Munkres and/or McCleary are the best books for point set topology, IMO. Think of this course as doing mathematics without the concept of distance (i.e., a metric). Without distance, how do you differentiate two objects mathematically? Do the objects have holes? how many? is it smooth, rough(resp), is there a boundary or is it locally round like a sphere? Basic (point set) topology looks to compare mathematical objects upto homeomorphisms. After point set topology things get really fun with subjects like knot/braid theory, homology and other algebraic topology, differential geometry and/or 4 manifolds, combinatorial topology, tqft's, Dessin D'enfant, just to name a few.


message 21: by Fatema (new)

Fatema (fatema7) That all sounds so interesting. I got really excited about the class after I read these responses so I ordered the Dover book and my textbook only to go check my email and have my professor tell me that I can't take topology this semester because of a prerequisite issue :( Oh well, there is always next semester.


message 22: by Martin (new)

Martin Cohen (mpcohen) | 1 comments I majored in math way long ago. I have a high school level Web page at http://www.mahed.org. I would appreciate any comments about it.

I am planning to learn more about geometry. I would like to study hyperbolic geometry and topology. I also want to know more about applied math, particularly if there is a geometric interpretation or a connection to biology. Number theory keeps snagging me, though if you asked me, I would swear I have no interest in it.


message 23: by Chris (new)

Chris Aldrich (chrisaldrich) | 19 comments In the past couple of years I've gone through Group Theory, Fields, Galois Theory, Differential Geometry, Manifolds, and most recently p-Adic Analysis. I'm about to embark on a quick journey through the theory of group representations.


message 24: by Yasiru (new)

Yasiru (yasiru89) | 13 comments I'm done with my degree, but currently taking an excursion into actuarial maths.
My main interests though are in the algebraic and analytic theories of numbers, which I'm following on my own. At uni I enjoyed Galois theory, group theory and representations, measure theory, Fourier analysis and complex analysis.


message 25: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments Ronald wrote: "Fatema wrote: "Adam wrote: "Depends on where you go. There's loads of stuff in grad school to take usually. Maybe your school has more stuff with Abstract Algebra and Geometry related courses? M..."

Thanks for the comment. I'm finally taking Topology this semester as I quite enjoyed Real Analysis. I don't really like the book we're using, so my professor recommended "Topology" by Munkres and that's great! I love that book so much. I'm really falling in love with analysis, so next semester I'm going to be taking "Analysis on Manifolds", "Differential Geometry" and "Functional Analysis". I would also like to learn "Measure Theory", but I need to find a prof willing to teach me. I think I know someone for the Fall, but if not, I may just teach myself over the summer. But I also need to read Baby Rudin, to really hone my skills with Real.


message 26: by Powerispower (new)

Powerispower I'm a maths undergraduate currently taking "complex analysis", "probability and statistics" and "applied mathematics" which is solving and analysis basic partial differential equations.


message 27: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 1 comments I'm a Politics major, however I'm interested in math, and so I've been trying to teach myself about this topic through books recommended on this group. I have to say, I love the head rush I get when I understand abstract concepts.


message 28: by Tattwamasi (new)

Tattwamasi Amrutam | 2 comments Dona wrote: "m doing a math major. currently studying abstract algebra, advanced calculus, differential equations, numerical analysis. wt abt all of u?"

i am a math undergraduate student currently in 2nd year, studying galois theory, vector calculus, differential equations


message 29: by Theresa (new)

Theresa Ramseyer | 25 comments Ashley wrote: "I'm a Politics major, however I'm interested in math, and so I've been trying to teach myself about this topic through books recommended on this group..."

I am almost the same as Ashley. Not a political major, but I am interested in math and in reviewing/teaching myself more. I have had 2 years of High School Algebra, 1 semester of College Algebra, 1 year of HS Geometry (my worst math), and a year of HS Trig/Math Analysis. Been out of both high school and college a long time, and miss the math.

Theresa


message 30: by Tuhin (new)

Tuhin Kar | 1 comments hallow friends.i'm an under graduate student.in my course i have to learn real analysis,complex analisis,vector and tensor analysis,abstract algebra etc.can i learn it by self study?


message 31: by Ronald (new)

Ronald Lett (slider142) | 15 comments Tuhin wrote: "hallow friends.i'm an under graduate student.in my course i have to learn real analysis,complex analisis,vector and tensor analysis,abstract algebra etc.can i learn it by self study?"

Sure, but never miss an opportunity to talk about it with a professor of the topic, or uppergraduates. There are many avenues and crossroads that can be opened easily through discussion that may not be apparent from a particular author's text. It helps to self-study as you are able to bypass basic questions and get to much deeper issues in class than you would have if you were learning the terminologies and applications for the first time.


message 32: by Leonard (new)

Leonard (leonardconstantin) | 1 comments Currently doing real and complex analysis, number theory, geometry and computational maths.


message 33: by Zero (new)

Zero Richardson (zeroangel) | 3 comments I've been out of formally learning math since 2009 when I graduated with my M.S. Been attending an Analysis Seminar where professors at the university I work at present talks every week and otherwise just reading and working on my own studies which focus on the best way to teach and learn math.

I miss the formal work, but a doctorate degree is out of the question for me for at least several more years.


message 34: by Lisa (last edited Mar 23, 2013 06:36AM) (new)

Lisa | 2 comments I am finishing up my PhD. My thesis is in the area of complex analysis. I study functions in Smirnov classes. I am currently taking a class on holomorphic PDE's.

I just took out a book titled The N Vortex Problem: Analytical Techniques by Paul Newton. Does anyone here study fluid flow from a complex analysis perspective?


message 35: by Matt (new)

Matt Jarvis | 2 comments I just finished my computer science undergrad where I majored in computational math. I was a long time out of high school when I went to uni, and very rusty with math, but I'm passionate about furthering my knowledge now that I've had a good taste. I'm currently exploring fractals.


message 36: by Mirek (new)

Mirek | 4 comments I'm going through real analysis (elementary). Gonna try abstract algebra and topology next.


message 37: by Adam (new)

Adam | 19 comments I loved Real analysis, I think that really opened a whole new world of math to me.


message 38: by Filipe (new)

Filipe | 1 comments Hello. I finished my undergrad studies in 2011, and now I'm finishing my master thesis in mathematical finance, and I should deliver it next September.


message 39: by Randy (new)

Randy | 9 comments Obtained my MS in 2006. Currently teaching . Taking a MOOc game theory class


message 40: by Hannes Salin (new)

Hannes Salin | 1 comments Soon completed first year on the mathematics program (towards bachelor's and later on master's degree), currently taking a course in abstract algebra.


message 41: by April (new)

April (firewings26) | 2 comments I'm about two years into my Bachelor's degree in Secondary Math Education. Haven't gotten much further than Algebra at the moment, but I have to take all the way to Calculus and Analytic Geometry II. I'm really looking forward to it!


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

im an engineering student. currently on lin. Algebra and multivariable calculus...at the 'pedestrian' level. Ill be studying differential equations, algebra 2 (abstract?) statistics, and set theory in the future!

math is intense.


message 43: by Vishal (new)

Vishal Ajwani | 1 comments I'm just a student of least level


message 44: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 1 comments Hi all, am finishing my A Levels (secondary school qualification) and am currently most interested in graph theory. Will start my maths undergraduate degree this October, really looking forward to it! Any other to-be undergrads around?

In any case, I look forward to getting to know you all. :)


message 45: by Randy (new)

Randy | 9 comments Big Data and economics. I am part time instructor at several community colleges and one state college.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

With respect to mathematics, I'm studying algorithms using The Algorithm Design Manual, free lecture videos from Princeton and MIT (through coursera and iTunes university), and Introduction to Algorithms, and discrete mathematics using Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science.

So far The Algorithm Design Manual and Concrete Mathematics are a lot of fun.


message 47: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth | 1 comments I am a graduate student in Data Science. Studying machine learning, graph theory, and optimization.


message 48: by Kevin (new)

Kevin (kweatherwalks) | 5 comments Hey, all! I just completed my first year of an associate of science degree at my local community college. I'll be taking Calc III, Linear Algebra, and Physics in the fall. I spent a lot of time on Khan Academy and various Coursera courses in the past few years.
Now, I've been reading a bit on cryptography (just finished Singh's The Code Book and loved it), though I currently lack the programming skills to efficiency solve some of the more complex classic ciphers. There are too many branches of mathematics that I want to master, and I have difficulty focusing on one subject for an extended period.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Kevin wrote: "Hey, all! I just completed my first year of an associate of science degree at my local community college. I'll be taking Calc III, Linear Algebra, and Physics in the fall. I spent a lot of time on ..."

you're on the verge of reaching a math horizon that will allow you to focus...


message 50: by [deleted user] (new)

Kevin wrote: "Hey, all! I just completed my first year of an associate of science degree at my local community college. I'll be taking Calc III, Linear Algebra, and Physics in the fall. I spent a lot of time on ..."

Adam wrote: "Kevin wrote: "Hey, all! I just completed my first year of an associate of science degree at my local community college. I'll be taking Calc III, Linear Algebra, and Physics in the fall. I spent a l..."

of course there'sprobably horizons everywhere....some tough terrain


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