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Off Topic > Do You Buy Self-pub/Small Press E-books?

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message 1: by Philip (new)

Philip Athans (philathans) Here's a question: Do you buy self-published or small press e-books? If so, how do you find them out there in the crowded universe of self-published e-books? If not, what's stopping you?


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Winter Frost Queen)  (gatadelafuente) If they are on Amazon.com I will. It depends on the story idea and the price. I use the Amazon.com recommends a lot, and I've found some nifty small press books on there. If they are more than $13 in print, and the ebook is more than $5, then I am too cheap to buy them.


message 3: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Yes and No.

I do buy from small press publishers (if I can find what I want). I mostly get my romances from small press (and I read a decent amount of romance so that's pretty hefty).

I tend to shy away from self-published works as they are usually full of items that need a professional editor STAT. I have purchased a handful but I've only read one. The one that I read was a great storyline but really could use a good edit. Review here: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 4: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments You know Tracey, you're so right. It's a mess trying to find a good book on Smashwords!

Now that I (have had a chance to check out my Smashwords library) checked, I've read a couple of self-pubbed that I picked up for free. *shudder*


message 5: by ♥Meagan♥ (new)

♥Meagan♥ (fadedrainbows) | 29 comments I read a lot of small press. Only one self-pubbed (Courtney Milan's Unlocked) and that was amazingggg, and very unusual for self-pubbed books.


message 6: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments ♥Meagan♥ wrote: "I read a lot of small press. Only one self-pubbed (Courtney Milan's Unlocked) and that was amazingggg, and very unusual for self-pubbed books."

It was amazing. But I totally KNOW its unusal for self-pubs. She stated in an interview that she put out a lot of personal money (which she can afford) to get everything perfect for the book.


message 7: by ♥Meagan♥ (new)

♥Meagan♥ (fadedrainbows) | 29 comments Yeah. I'm glad she did so well, though. :)


message 8: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Me, too. I love it!


colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) I do sometimes. I like the idea of supporting indie publishers and even some self-published authors, but often the price turns me off.

As for where I find them - I've found a few that look interesting from giveaways (i.e. Dante's Journey, which I really hope I win).
Once or twice from the buzz around goodreads (i.e. The Crown Conspiracy), and, very occasionally, from plugs that people put in the groups here.

That said, much of the interaction I've had with self published authors on the groups has been more bad than good and has helped turn me off a lot more than it's attracted me.


message 10: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Tracey wrote: "^ This.

Unless the book sounds absolutely irresistible (which I don't think has happened yet) or unless the author has made an effort to be a part of the community beyond "read my book!" and "..."


I agree with this, too. Most of the self-pubs I purchased were because I'd spoken to the author.


message 11: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl Landmark (clandmark) | 861 comments Since I've been on Goodreads, I've purchased a number of small press and indie books. I'm all for giving these authors a chance to strut their stuff and show me what they have.

And, for the most part, they've been quite good. Not perfect, mind you, but some of them have shown a lot of potential; with the help of a good editor, I think they could be very good books. I can't really say I've been totally disappointed or frustrated with any of the books I've bought so far. And, all of the books have been freely chosen by me; not one of the authors has shamelessly or relentlessly entreated me to buy their book.

Before Goodreads, I always bought my books from the bookstore or signed them out from the library. I never purchased anything online. Now, Amazon.ca is my go-to site for the indie books I can't find in the bookstore.


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

I don't purchase self published novels as a rule of thumb. I respect anyone that writes and I can understand the allure of self publishing but I think it's so important to go through a reputable publisher, for the editing staff if nothing else. Of course, it's a crapshoot getting published so I can also see where self publishing would seem a reasonable route. I imagine the success ratio for self pubs is rather abysmal. The only thing that would possibly convince me to purchase a self pub would be a very, very well written teaser or first chapter. It would have to Really grab me in order to make me take the plunge. It's funny, I'm almost fantatical in my support of indie music but self pubs leave me leery. Go figure.


I wouldn't deal with small press e-books either though I'm willing to give small dtb publishers my business. I'm very, VERY fond of PYR. Lou Anders has a real eye for talent


message 13: by Kevin (new)

Kevin | 284 comments I don't read ebooks at this point. There's to much hassle for me in terms of availability (I'm in mainland Europe), pricing and quality. But mostly I just don't enjoy reading on digital displays for a long stretch of time.

So most self published stuff drops off for that reason alone. But even if it didn't I simply don't have the time or the inclination to sift through all the slush in order to get to the good stories. And going by the few examples I have seen even those good stories are marred by poor editing and horrendous formatting. Something I really can't see past if I have to pay money for the story and even if it is free, I'd go nuts reading through a full length novel filled with typos and creative grammar.

Then considering there are currently literally hundreds of books on my tbr list and that I'm already, struggling to stick to my 50 books goal for this year, I really can't be bothered with the whole self publishing scene at this point.

As far as publishers go, I don't really care by which publisher a book is. As long as they have some decent printing quality and make the paper book available in a way that I can get it on this side of the pond without having to spend more than the book price on shipping I'm ok. I got some books by Pyr, Nightshade, Overlook Press that I rate very highly (those are smaller publishers right?).


message 14: by Philip (new)

Philip Athans (philathans) GREAT comments, everybody--thank you.

One comment on the comments:

As a professional editor for the last quarter century or so, it does my heart good to see that people really do value the contribution of a good editor. I would NEVER publish (in any form) anything that didn't have an editorial eye on it.


message 15: by Dawson (new)

Dawson Vosburg (dawsonvosburg) This is an especially interesting as an author who has gone through self publishing--people's perception seems to be that most of it is slush to wade through, which makes you think about how people perceive your book.

I'm still appalled at how attention is paid to good cover design, book interior design, and especially EDITING.

Your comments are incredible. I myself don't often trust many indie fantasy book because often they don't very clearly tell me what they are and what I can expect from the story. This makes no sense to me, since it isn't hard to tell the audience what they're about to read.


message 16: by Dawson (new)

Dawson Vosburg (dawsonvosburg) Tracey wrote: "Dawson wrote: "This is an especially interesting as an author who has gone through self publishing--people's perception seems to be that most of it is slush to wade through..."

Unfortunately, as I..."

One of the reasons why I decided to start by self publishing was because very few publishers would take on a book by a teenager who wasn't already famous *ahem, ahem, Miles to Go*. Really what you've got to do is distinguish yourself by making sure that you're writing well and you don't end up with trash.

There is, however, one thing that embarrasses me greatly--I wrote the Acknowledgments in my book rather quickly and wrote it in InDesign (where there is no spellcheck). I misspelled Christopher Paolini's name, which in my mind is nearly as bad as if I'd murdered the man.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

I couldn't stress how important a good description is for self epubs. It's not as though you can hold the book and admire the coverart. Ultimately it's just a scanned drawing or pic or worse, just a lame design. At least with a description, you can get a basic idea of an author's talent or lack thereof. I've seen so many authors here on goodreads espousing their wares, read their descriptions and shook my head in disgust at the Awful writing I found there. It's like a date. You always clean up extra nice to make the best first impression ya can. It's just common sense.


message 18: by Denae (new)

Denae (whimsicalmeerkat) | 0 comments I actually bought a book that I will most likely never read simply because the quality of the author's "ad" was both in the right place on the forums and such a cut above the normal utterly terrible promotion attempts around here.


message 19: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Dawson wrote: "This is an especially interesting as an author who has gone through self publishing--people's perception seems to be that most of it is slush to wade through, which makes you think about how people..."

Writing is pretty hard work and a lot of time the other niceties that go along with publishing get overlooked when focused on how hard writing is. The most important part is the editing - and not just proof reading but copy editing. There is no weapon more important to a writing than a good copy editor who won't coddle and kiss up to a writer. I think this person should always be a paid impartial 3rd party. Friends and family members will always be kinder (which isn't the best in the long run).


message 20: by Bill (new)

Bill (kernos) | 350 comments Small publishers definitely. Some of the best books I've read have come from small publishers, esp those that are focused.

Self-published I have problems with since he majority are self-edited and self-proofed. And, I have no found a good mechanism to triage the books. My time is my only currency to waste on badly written material.


message 21: by Scott (new)

Scott Stabler (scottstabler) | 1 comments The Dread Pirate Grant said "I don't purchase self published novels as a rule of thumb. I respect anyone that writes and I can understand the allure of self publishing but I think it's so important to go through a reputable publisher, for the editing staff if nothing else. Of course, it's a crapshoot getting published so I can also see where self publishing would seem a reasonable route. I imagine the success ratio for self pubs is rather abysmal. The only thing that would possibly convince me to purchase a self pub would be a very, very well written teaser or first chapter. It would have to Really grab me in order to make me take the plunge."

I understand your reservation about self-published authors, but as you said...it's a crapshoot seeking traditional routes, the odds are truely stacked against first-time authors with zero contacts in the field, which lead many to self-publish. I would humbly ask you to check out this website
http://knightsofthedawnking.com Obviously I'm just a little bias being the author, but I truely believe it is a quality self-published book, just needs some exposure. I would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks


colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) I've decided that along with a kick-ass blurb, if an indie author wants me to consider his/her work then he/she needs to supply a few chapters as a preview. As has been said, going to a bookstore people can flip through a book and see if the style is to their liking. And maybe the ebook preview chapter thing has spoiled me, but it's become a must for me to have.


message 23: by Terry (new)

Terry Simpson | 261 comments I myself buy all kinds of books. Usually only after I read a sample. I'm also a self-pubbed author whose book will be coming out in September. I did spend on a good artist for my cover, hired an editor, all for the very same issues and concerns I see posted here. Concerns that have made me not buy books, not just ebooks but some traditionally published books because of lack of editing or simply what I felt was bad writing or writing that in no way appealed to me. For my books I have chapters posted here on goodreads and on my sites. I've also made it clear these samples are before the editor. As soon as the final drafts are done, I intend to add those. I believe any author worth his salt nowadays should be willing to post sample chapters. I simply will not read a book without reading sample. I've been burnt too many times.

If anyone cares to read my samples: http://www.goodreads.com/story/show/2...

I do also have to point out that the selfpublishing/ebook movement going on at present isn't just authors who couldn't get published etc for whatever reasons. There are plenty of published authors taking this route for the simple fact they have more control, relish their creative freedom and their royalties are better.

No matter what though I don't think there is any excuse for putting out work that has not seen an editor. Work that has not seen multiple critiques by people outside of that writer's circle of friends. I said as much on my blog. Many editors are writers and even they have their own stuff edited by another.


message 24: by Steve (last edited Jul 24, 2011 08:38PM) (new)

Steve Thomas | 102 comments I am part of the self-publishing crowd, so my perspective may differ from the norm.

Prior to buying a nook, I was ambivalent to self-published/small press novels. I didn't see them because they weren't at the book store. When I decided to self-publish my own novel, I became more exposed to the community--author forums, review blogs, etc. That increased my exposure to other such authors, and I naturally became curious about their work.

Usually, I picked out books based on the author's behavior on forums, reviews, and clicking through the also-boughts of my own books.

My success rate is about the same as traditionally published authors, at least for books that made it through my selection process. I think there's an undeserved stigma that these people are failures who are trying to squeeze a few dollars out of manuscripts that got rejected over and over. I'm sure that happens. Often, though, self-publishing is simply born out of a do-it-yourself attitude.


message 25: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Steve wrote: "I think there's an undeserved stigma that these people are failures who are trying to squeeze a few dollars out of manuscripts that got rejected over and over. I'm sure that happens. Often, though, self-publishing is simply born out of a do-it-yourself attitude. "

I don't think that people who self pub are failures...I think that some of them fail to plan. That is a big difference. Most people - even heavy readers - are not editors so it is very difficult for self-pubbed writers to get good editing unless they are paying for it. And editing is SO much more than just proof-reading. It's telling someone that their multi-year masterpiece needs another year or two of work. And most of the self-pubbed work I have read falls in the “needs editing” category.

I think failure is harsh – obviously the person who has published has accomplished something since it is published and it is for sale.

Another major hurdle that self-published authors have to deal with are Authors Who Behave Badly. I see it all the time, especially in the romance genre. An author gets an attitude with a reviewer/fan/reader over a poor review or gets jealous of anthor self-pub who is doing better than them and has a foul-mouthed rage on their blog and it sets the internet on fire. This stuff spreads like wild-fire and most of the time it is a self-pubbed author.


message 26: by Steve (last edited Jul 25, 2011 05:33PM) (new)

Steve Thomas | 102 comments MrsJoseph, I can't disagree with any of that.


message 27: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments This is a great discussion! I was wondering what you guys think about a writer self-publishing an anthology of their own short stories; stories of which have already been published by magazines, websites, and other anthologies?

People who know me can probably guess why I'm asking this. I have 13 to 15 stories published and have been thinking of self-publishing them in a single collection. If I were to do so, I would hire an editor, ebook formater, and a good artist. I'm not sure if this is a good idea, though. Self-publishing has been looked down upon for so long now, I really don't want to make the mistake of doing it and then wishing I hadn't when it's done.

Any thoughts? :)


message 28: by Denae (new)

Denae (whimsicalmeerkat) | 0 comments Another thing you might want to do is check all of your publication agreements and be sure you can republish without the permission of the journal/paper/magazine/press that originally published the work.


message 29: by Kevin (new)

Kevin | 284 comments Jason wrote: "This is a great discussion! I was wondering what you guys think about a writer self-publishing an anthology of their own short stories; stories of which have already been published by magazines, we..."

I think it's a good idea really. I get the idea from your post that the main thing that's holding you back is fear of tarnishing your reputation as a 'serious writer' by going self-published. I honestly don't think you need to worry about that. As long as you deliver a quality product that shouldn't be a problem.

Jim C. Hines for example is in the process of self-publishing his second short story collection even though he is a published author with Daw. He has some interesting blog posts on the subject as well.

I don't think that nowadays the majority of people still 'look down upon' self-publishing in itself, and considering the ever rising popularity of e-readers and amazon e.a.'s sales figures for (self-published) e-books the problem doesn't lie at that end either.

The reason I personally don't read self-published stuff has mainly to do with me not liking e-books. I don't like reading off of computer monitors and other displays for long periods of time, and maybe I'm just a bit of a Luddite in that I prefer a nice looking physical copy of the stuff I read on my shelves.

Of course there will always be people who do raise their nose at it, but that's with everything in life. I get the impression that in the professional publishing world that mentality is quickly disappearing.


message 30: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Jason wrote: "This is a great discussion! I was wondering what you guys think about a writer self-publishing an anthology of their own short stories; stories of which have already been published by magazines, we..."

I think that if you do the work you mentioned, it would be fabulous. I think that the problem are those people who are not willing to do what you mentioned.

Unlocked Unlocked (Turner, #1.5) by Courtney Milan by Courtney Milan is her first self-published work after years with a traditional publisher. She gave an interview where she spoke about the fact that she got an pro-editor, a cover artist, etc before going to "print." Put on sale for $0.99, the book has been at the top of the bestseller list (in romance) for several weeks. I've read it (it's also for sale on Goodreads!) and it's pretty good.


message 31: by Philip (new)

Philip Athans (philathans) I have some friends who are self publishing story anthologies, or individual stories and doing fine.

For instance, Paul S. Kemp:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003...

and Mel Odom:

http://www.amazon.com/Serpent-Lakes-e...

I honestly can't think of any reason not to do this and very likely will do it myself soon, too.


message 32: by Denae (new)

Denae (whimsicalmeerkat) | 0 comments All of the above reasons, as well as my overall hatred of the appearance and poor navigability of the site, are why I find the general love for smashwords inexplicable. I just can't find my way around it and the fact that they call their optional filter a prude filter just makes me dislike them more.


message 33: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Denae wrote: "All of the above reasons, as well as my overall hatred of the appearance and poor navigability of the site, are why I find the general love for smashwords inexplicable. I just can't find my way aro..."

Ah! I've never browsed smashwords, I only go looking for specific things/authors/titles and then I'm out.


message 34: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments Thanks for all the advice guys! I think that I'm going to go through with it! All the rights for the stories I want to use for this will have reverted back to me by the time I get to do this, which I'm thinking will be sometime next year.

I really hate poor cover art, too! I especially hate it when professional companies produce them. Dorchester was a good example of this before they went under. Their horror division, Leisure, could be atrocious. They'd put out one or two really great covers for one year, then the rest would be computer generated pieces of crap. They were embarrassing. LOL

As for smashwords, I've only gone there when an author I enjoy has a book on sale or for free there. When I create my collection, I might sell it there, but I want to sell it primarily at Amazon and Borders.


message 35: by Scott (new)

Scott Hah, Leisure did have some cheap covers. How many of them were a picture of some old house with a Photoshop effect thrown over it?


message 36: by Jason (last edited Jul 27, 2011 03:28PM) (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments Or some cheaply computer generated dude reaching out for you!


message 37: by Philip (new)

Philip Athans (philathans) I think the real value of Smashwords is as an aggregator: They can get your stuff on the Sony store, iBooks, etc.--right?

Their site is pretty clunky and all that porn-on-home-page thing is a sign of a very young and inexperienced company still trying to figure out how to do what they do without alienating their customers from the get-go.

Hopefully they'll figure that out soon.


message 38: by Jan (new)

Jan | 62 comments I think one of the concepts of a new writer getting started even though they have considerable talent is the expense. When cover art starts out at $450.00 and up and an editor charges anywhere from five cents to 10 cents a word, it gets ugly fast. Most struggling authors don't have that kind of cash laying around. I'm not saying that a good cover or an editor are not needed, I'm just stating that these are some of the reasons. How do you get started in an industry when you have talent but no money? It's really hard to get an agent to even look, let alone read your book with how the industry is today. The reason I know is I have a friend who is struggling to get an agent to look at his book and has been considering doing it self-published. Finding a good editor is there too, there are plenty that advertise but how do you know it's the right person for you.


colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) About the cover-art - why not just keep it simple? Especially in today's market, there seems to be a big push in simpler designs - the black covers with one, boldly colored symbol or picture of something. (The Twilight look, effectively.)

I've seen some indie authors try to have characters on their books, or detailed landscapes, or something, and they almost always look pretty cheesy if they don't have a professional designer.

And I find myself wondering why they don't follow the ever popular K.I.S.S. axiom.


message 40: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Colleen of the Crawling Chaos wrote: "About the cover-art - why not just keep it simple? Especially in today's market, there seems to be a big push in simpler designs - the black covers with one, boldly colored symbol or picture of so..."

^This. Sometimes the most simple things are the best.


message 41: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) I'll buy anything for my kindle if the price is right. I don't even have to pay the garbageman to haul it away if I don't like it.

I often brouse through the Amazon books catagory by catagory looking for free and cheap books. I set my brouser to find everything rated 4 stars and up, then list them in order of price. Before purchasing aI verify the genre, then look at how the ratings were parsed out numarically if there are enough ratings with 5 or 4 stars (more than 3 and below combined) I consider it. Ive found some garbage, and some surprisingly good stuff. More good than bad actually. I read the product discriptoin (if there is one) and sometimes a good and a bad review for some comparison.

There are lists that highlight 4 and 5 star rated books on the "Free" shelves or "less than 2.99" etc."

Your not going to find your established tried and true talents that way unless the books are old and/or out of print (I do buy books at full kindle price now and then). More and more books are going eReader formats sooner and sooner after they are published in hardcopy.

e-Books allow you to see those writers that nobody knew about, as much as a chance to understand why nobody knows about them. Think about it. The average writer gets what $0.25 off of the sail of any paperback book (or less, depending). If you take away the cost of paper, binding an ink (not to mention the employees it takes to get a book ready for the shelf) and even selling a book at a lower price there would be more money available to pay royalties to a writer. (not that Amazon or B&N are thinking like that yet.) Where else can you make a name for yourself in a business that prefers to rely on name recognition as much as quality product?


message 42: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments I love ebooks but I am very selective about what I buy (and even about which free books I get). I am not a file hoarder and I have plans to crack open every book that I own.

Because my family has an average life expectancy of about 85 years, my reading time is very finite. I don't want to waste my time slumming around trying to find a good book in a trash bin. I want a good book that grabs my attention within 2 chapters. If not (and esp if there is bad editing/proofing/typos) it's trashed.

I guard my reading time jealously.


message 43: by Kevin (new)

Kevin | 284 comments MrsJoseph wrote: "I love ebooks but I am very selective about what I buy (and even about which free books I get). I am not a file hoarder and I have plans to crack open every book that I own.

Because my family h..."


I have a very similar reading philosphy. With the exception that 85 is about the maximum life expectancy in my family not the average. Genes suck. :(


message 44: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) MrsJoseph wrote: "I love ebooks but I am very selective about what I buy (and even about which free books I get). I am not a file hoarder and I have plans to crack open every book that I own.

Because my family h..."


eh? What do you mean File Hoarder? (spoken in as muich of a Fred Ward drawl as possible). This "file hoarder concept" is "so simple, but like the jitterbug, it plum evaded me." (J. Buffet)

1. Why would anyone down load books/files they don't have a desire to read? The books are on Amazon's shelves. I just have a screening process that helps me narrow down books from over 70,000 titles to a couple hundred so I can better choices. I actually have more books on my shelves at home than on my kindle. I actually had never thought that somewhere somebody was just downloading anything on a whim, just to have them. "Here, look at my kindle I got hundreds o' dem free books! Yuk yuk." That sounds obsessivley crazy to me. Why would anyone do that?

2. Jeez Louise! so what if there is a file hoarder. This only affects the person downloading everything under the sun (again note above that I use my process to help screen things so I can fidn the needles in the haystack. I don't bring the hay stack to my computer). This isn't like the library when I check out a book and it's not there until I give it back to the library. e-books don't deplete when you down load them, though the good ones go up in price.

3. This screening process doesn't speak to the need for editers and the host of marketing skills that come with publishers one way or the other. Frankly, most of the time I can tell when something has been self-published and when it's gone through a "comercial/professional" publishing process. The "published works" are almost always (but not quite always) better than the self published works on the e-shelf. Hence I "buy" a lot of books for my Kindle too.

4. I am speaking to a means of getting your work noticed as a consumer that beats the hell out of hoping "White Dwarf" magazine publishes your short story. It difuses the old, "you gotta have a job to get a job trap." E-books allow a lot of people who haven't found a market for their work, an outlet to reach people who might be interested. I am interested in new and inventive works by authors I've never heard about.

Just my two cents... okay, more like 4 and a half cents. Sorry for the run on posting. I need to get some typers imodium somewhere.


message 45: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Well, I know people who spend tons of money on ebooks - and when you add in the multitudes of free ebooks (you can get at least 4 free ebooks a day from Amazon if you're being picky). God only knows how many if you're just collecting.

Most of these people don't read the books, they just want to say they have them. I meet them all the time at MR: "The latest ___ book? I got it from Amazon yesterday. There are free copies of the most crappy book ever created? Let me get 5!" Eh. It kills me. I don't even enter the giveaways here if the book doesn't look interesting.


message 46: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) MrsJoseph wrote: "Well, I know people who spend tons of money on ebooks - and when you add in the multitudes of free ebooks (you can get at least 4 free ebooks a day from Amazon if you're being picky). God only kno..."

I guess I'm just trying to say..."We ain't all like that." Not everyone with an e-Reader wears it like The Red Badge of Courage."

Sales of e-books (for money, not free) surpassed sales of books in print moth's ago, do you think that all the sales are for purposes as shallow as being able to stick a kindle under someone's nose and act like posession of a book (in any form) makes one smarter or better?

And you have met some real idiots if they downloaded five coppies of anything just to have it. To me, that sounds as stupid as wearing five pairs of pants in case you decide to go to the prom later in the year.

I'd also say that having a hard copy book with paper pages and a solid bindng in hand does not mean you enjoy reading or books any more than a person who uses an e-Reader or that you have more respect for books than a person with an e-reader, or even that you care more about books and quality than the e-reader sect.

For me it's the story that counts not the media used to enjoy it. I'm sure there's plenty of snobery to go around on both sides of the e-reader vs. print issue. I just don't think snobery in any form is pertinant.

"Can't we all just get along?" (Rodney King)


message 47: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments I have an ereader and I'm not saying that people shouldn't use them.

I'm saying that one of the reasons I don't even pick up a lot of self-pubs is because I am very particular about my reading time.


message 48: by The Pirate Ghost (new)

The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) (pirateghost) MrsJoseph wrote: "I have an ereader and I'm not saying that people shouldn't use them.

I'm saying that one of the reasons I don't even pick up a lot of self-pubs is because I am very particular about my reading time."


I completely agree with you. I wouldn't have such an elaborate screening process if didn't care about the quality of what I allow on my kindle. (Truth be told, my screening process really has more steps than I posted.)

Having said that,I'm not "afraid" to take a chance on something that looks worth it simpley because it's ... "one of 'those' self-pub jobs." There are a lot of published works I don't want to waist my reading time on too. I screen them before I decide to buy or not to buy

(....that is the question, twer it nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous misfortune...) Sorry... I waxed Shakespeare for a moment.

Amazon does let you down load the first chapter of any book free. Even B&N lets you Down Load a book when your in one of their stores for free (while your there) and read it. Responsible e-Readers should practice Safe Down loading... you know, protect themselves so they don't catch anything they can't get rid of like a virus... or... nevermind. Once your unit is coupled with theirs you it may be too late to save yourself. (yeah, I went there! (:<{(} )


message 49: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments lol!

I don't own a Kindle. I need not to have instant access to d/l books. Ever.

Personally, I've been had a few times by self-pubs. Some are good. Some are great. Some really need editing...and some need to be burned for the good of all.

There was one self-pub I really wanted...but the guy lives in Australia and only had HB DTB's. Shipping alone would have been $22. He was rather prepared except for shipping and distribution.


message 50: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Update: I just checked his site and he's finally gone ebook. But the dang thing is broken up into 3 different sections at $3 each! Why can't I just buy one file? That would make more sense.

He would have had a sale from the original post if the book hadn't have been $32 + $22 in shipping. I don't pay that for anything but leather-bound gold-leaf.


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