Reluctant Readers discussion

38 views
11 Yr old son.

Comments Showing 1-15 of 15 (15 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Bonnieandsean (new)

Bonnieandsean | 4 comments My son hates reading and failed reading this yr. My 16 Yr old and I are avid readers, I can't understand why I can't get him interested in any topic. I hope this group can help with ideas.


message 2: by Max (new)

Max Anderson | 5 comments I grew up hating to read. That's why I write for struggling readers now. You can look into my action-adventures & mysteries at the following links

When the Lights Go Out http://max-whenlightsgoout.blogspot.com
Books for Boys Blog http://booksandboys.blogspot.com
Video When the Lights Go Out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfSEkG...
Video - Barney and the Runaway http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0l7ZU...
My Youtube Videos http://www.youtube.com/user/Maxbooks100


message 3: by Bonnieandsean (new)

Bonnieandsean | 4 comments Thank you I will look into your stories.


message 4: by Max (new)

Max Anderson | 5 comments Let me know if you have any questions along the way.


message 5: by Kim (new)

Kim Donovan | 4 comments Hello! I think the general view is that it's better to read something than nothing. Perhaps graphic novels, such as the x-men, might appeal.

I was talking to the mother of a reluctant 10 yr old reader the other day and she said that if one of her son's friends recommended a book to him he was much more likely to read it. She also said that if he'd seen a film, based on a book, she could persuade him to read it too (She was talking about Diary of a Wimpy Kid). He is reading my book for 7-9 year olds (about a school for super villains) on Authonomy at the moment. He likes the idea of writing a review and helping me with it. Your son is very welcome to do that too. I'll give you the URL if he's interested.

Other books i know boys of this age group love - Skulduggery Pleasant or Tunnels.
I really hope this helps.
With best wishes
Kim


message 6: by Bonnieandsean (new)

Bonnieandsean | 4 comments yes that would be a great idea for him to write a review. He has read all the Wimpy kid books over and over, but for school he has to read 25 books so I have to try to get him to branch out to other stories. Thank you for your information. B-


message 7: by Kim (new)

Kim Donovan | 4 comments Bonnieandsean wrote: "yes that would be a great idea for him to write a review. He has read all the Wimpy kid books over and over, but for school he has to read 25 books so I have to try to get him to branch out to oth..."

Hi Bonnie. Here's the URL. http://www.authonomy.com/books/30342/...

I had planned to take St Viper's off authonomy soon, but if your son does fancy reading it/ helping me let me know and i'll keep it on there. You will have to register to write a review (this is to stop writers cheating!!!).
With best wishes
Kim


message 8: by Manypagesago (new)

Manypagesago | 1 comments Parents Who Love Reading, Kids Who Don't How It Happens and What You Can Do About It by Mary Leonhardt

This book has some really good suggestions from a teacher (and mother) who worked with reluctant readers.

Another thought, particularly around age 11, is to have his eyes checked for far-sightedness, and if possible, by an optometrist who is a member of http://covd.org/ who can check other aspects of vision such as whether his eyes work together, whether they can track across the page, maintain focus for a length of time, etc. School screenings are just a quick check for nearsightedness. A lot of subtle problems can make reading unpleasant. Even regular optometrists don't always check for the things a COVD optometrist will, yet those aspects of vision can make a huge difference in whether a kid feels like reading is a huge chore.

Here's a book on it:
When Your Child Struggles The Myths of 20/20 Vision What Every Parent Needs to Know by O.D. David L. Cook


message 9: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 1 comments Have you tried the How to Train Your Dragon series?


message 10: by Max (new)

Max Anderson | 5 comments This new one comes out on August 15, Captain Jack's Treasure blog http://treasurecaptainjack.blogspot.com


message 11: by Bonnieandsean (new)

Bonnieandsean | 4 comments No I have not. He is visiting his dad until mid August. I plan to try out all these suggestions when he returns. Thank you.


message 12: by Alexandra (last edited Jun 09, 2012 04:12AM) (new)

Alexandra Pratt (AlexJP) | 2 comments Sometimes it's not just about the topic when it comes to getting reluctant readers to open a book. Books written specifically for these readers are carefully structured, with language set at a level that encourages development, without being off-putting. This is combined with chapters that are fast paced, and exciting plots to keep them hooked with 'what's next?'. Often they are adventure stories, which have a strong appeal for boys. Several publishers specialize in books for these readers, and I've written for two of them; Moriarty Press (for e-books only); Shipwrecked! Murder and Mutiny in Remotest Patagonia
and Barrington Stoke The Day The Island Exploded (Reality Check) by Alexandra J. Pratt The Day The Island Exploded


message 13: by Amber (new)

Amber Harvey | 1 comments You can download my book Mayne Island Skeletons form Smashwords if you have a reading device. It has been reviewed several times, favourably. A girl and boy in the 11-12 age group solve mysteries and have various adventures on Mayne Island, an island off the west coast of Canada. Let me know if you or your reluctant reader enjoy it.
Amber Harvey
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/...


message 14: by zale (new)

zale | 1 comments How is the search for reading material going?
Has anything caught your son's fancy yet?


message 15: by Max (new)

Max Anderson | 5 comments Books you can trust for your kids
http://booksandboys.blogspot.com/2012...


back to top