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Monthly Book Discussions > July 2011: In the Garden of Beasts discussion Discussion

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message 1: by Jamie (new)

Jamie (ahealthyjd) I so wish I had a copy of this to read right now. I'm current patron 6 of 9 at my local library for an e-copy to read. It's looking like I won't get it this month :(


message 2: by JudgyK (new)

JudgyK Jamie wrote: "I so wish I had a copy of this to read right now. I'm current patron 6 of 9 at my local library for an e-copy to read. It's looking like I won't get it this month :("

I'm wondering if we should avoid brand-new releases in the future. I know a number of our members rely on libraries to get their books, and the rest of us don't seem to be rolling in money a la Scrooge McDuck either. I know I haven't bought this book because it's only available in hardcover. I might get it on my Nook for a fraction of the price, or I might just wait until it's in paperback.


message 3: by Jamie (new)

Jamie (ahealthyjd) Amie wrote: "I might get it on my Nook for a fraction of the price, or I might just wait until it's in paperback. "

I considered getting it for my Kindle but my normal book buying policy is to spend under $10 and this one is sitting at $13. If I didn't have a stack of books I purchased recently to get through I would just go for it but my book budget is pretty maxed out at the moment.


message 4: by Jamie (new)

Jamie (ahealthyjd) Jill wrote: "although I hate it that the new releases aren't always accessible for everyone, I also don't like the idea of limiting our choices only to paperbacks. I'm hoping that the new releases continue to balance out with the older books/paperbacks, which has pretty much been the case since we started reading more than one book a month."

I agree! I plan on coming back to the discussion boards and reading what people said and contributing for any books I don't get to read at the time we read them. I'm also hoping to power through some of the books I've recently purchased so I can make sure I have time to commit to the August picks :)


message 5: by Sherri (last edited Jul 14, 2011 02:53PM) (new)

Sherri I have finished the book so I will try to avoid spoilers.
I liked William Dodd more at the end than early in the book. At first I thought him a little stuffy.
I was shocked with Martha. She would fit in more after 1966 than she did before. A woman way before her time.
Messersmith was very admirable. Wish there were more of him back in the 30s.
I was not surprised at the reaction to what was going on in Germany. You have to remember the entire "civilized" world was going throught the Depression and concentrating on where the next meal was coming from. Also, most people now do not realize how much antisemitism there was all over - not just in Germany. The Dreyfus affair occurred only about 30 years earlier in France. Even in the good old USA discrimination against Jews was not questioned.


message 6: by Kim (new)

Kim | 7 comments I'm a new member of the group and I'm about 30% into the book - loving it so far. I think its fascinating that William Dodd was not a typical foreign diplomat - his "schoolteacher" manner of dealing with his adversaries was so interesting to me. And so much paranoia within the different ranks of Hitler's government, even from the beginning. American tourists being beaten for failing to stop and watch an SS parade? I had no idea! This is such a good read, and eye-opening, too.


message 7: by Kim (new)

Kim | 7 comments I agree - especially with Martha - she felt like a fictional character to me. Maybe its because she never really tried to control herself. I read the excerpts from letters and documents that Larson added to the end of the book, and it cracked me up that those men didn't know what to do with Martha other than complain about her in their diaries.


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