flight paths discussion

13 views
About Books & Reading > Best book of the year so far?

Comments Showing 1-40 of 40 (40 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) We're just about halfway through 2011! (Good grief! How did that happen?) What is the best book you're read so far this year? What did you like about it? Do you think it's good enough to hold it's place as #1 through the rest of the year?


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Les Mis and Ulysses are both so very good! (By the way, Ulysses Annotated by Don Gifford is an excellent companion for Ulysses.)

I haven't read Dubliners, except for one story - The Dead (which was absolutely marvelous!) - and I definitely plan to get around to the rest of the stories, one of these days. :)


message 3: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments HRO, I just took out Ulysses Annotated from the library so it's good to hear your approval.

Even reading the first chapter, I admit feeling a bit over-whelmed by the prospect of the rest of the book!

I can't pick the best so far. I don't know why but nothing quite fits. Dubliners would be the closest. But I'm not sure.

I may just chuck everything & go back to my annual reading of Finnegans Wake. My daughter (who reads but not as compulsively as I do & certainly not any "old" writers-that would be writers who were writing before, say, now) keeps asking why I'm not reading it this summer.


message 4: by Ann A (last edited Jun 26, 2011 09:17PM) (new)

Ann A (readerann) I just bought Dubliners at Powell's Books in Portland last month. I thought I would read it before I begin Ulysses. I also picked up an old copy of James Joyce's Ulysses - A study by Stuart Gilbert, so I would have something to help me along. It's nice to know about Ulysses Annotated as well. Not sure when I'll get to these as my TBR list is LONG and I never know what I'm going to grab next.

As far as the best book I've read so far this year, I'll have to think about it for a bit...


message 5: by Ann A (new)

Ann A (readerann) Oh, I also looked for a Finnegan's Wake companion, but couldn't find anything. Can anyone recommend one? I'm in awe of you, Ellie - an annual reading of Finnegan's Wake - wow. That's the only book I can think of where I read 10 pages or so and put it aside, just not feeling able to tackle it at the time!


message 6: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments Don't be in too much awe, Ann-I don't read the whole thing every summer just a chunk of it. But even that feels so good! I'm really just like you that way. Except I'm very happy with 50 or 100 pages at at go.

The books I use, actually, are Joyce's Book of the Dark: Finnegans Wake and Annotations to "Finnegans Wake". They've been very helpful & fun in themselves & I would have been lost without them I think.

There's something about summer that must make me want to return to the Liffey! lol


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) These comments illustrate what people don't understand about Joyce. His books are not the type that you just pick up and read through in a couple days. His books require full immersion...in-depth study...your whole brain.

When I read Ulysses, it was for my high school senior thesis. As a result, I spent about six months with that book! When I re-read it again a few times over the next couple years, I could do so more quickly and without a lot of annotated help. If I read it again now, though, it would definitely require another in-depth study.

I'm not sure I'll ever have the courage to deal with Finnegan's Wake, though! ;)

P.S. I should re-name this thread "James Joyce" and start a new one about our favorite books of the year...lol


message 8: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments The Way of Kings

Far out in the lead, although I had to put it down occasionally due to its weight in the kindle-less world.

Guess this shows I am an amateur hobbyist when it comes to reading, making me both top and bottom of the food chain.


message 9: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments Her Royal Orangeness wrote: "These comments illustrate what people don't understand about Joyce. His books are not the type that you just pick up and read through in a couple days. His books require full immersion...in-depth s..."

Well, HRO, I'm not sure you understood my response. I read Ulysses 3 times as a graduate over the course of 4 years, each time spending months with the book-an entire semester each time, along with another book that we were comparing and contrasting.

And I certainly never said I read FW in a sitting-over the course of several months I read (and/or reread 50 100 pages). This time, like you I would need annotations again since it's been so many years.


message 10: by Her Royal Orangeness (last edited Jun 27, 2011 05:59AM) (new)

Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Ellie, I'm not sure how we're misunderstanding each other. :) My comment was in no way intended as an attack against you!

What I meant to say is that "most people" say that Joyce is ridiculously impossible, but, as proven by the comments here, his writing can be enjoyed IF one understands that Joyce requires a great deal of the reader.


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Ice wrote: "The Way of Kings Far out in the lead, although I had to put it down occasionally due to its weight in the kindle-less world. Guess this shows I am an amateur hobbyist when it comes to reading, making me both top and bottom of the food chain."

This book sounds interesting, Ice. What did you like about it?

And no need to apologize for your choice in reading material. We all enjoy what we enjoy! :) And, believe me, when I finally post my favorites of the year, you'll see that my reading is generally far lighter than classics like Les Mis and Ulysses, so I'm right there with you.


message 12: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments I have found myself running out of interesting book series to read (I find the same issue with TV) and its great to have found a new series to follow (Noting that I have not yet read A Game of Thrones ). There are new elements added here, geography (North is Hot, South is Cold, And East is West almost), biology (animal and plant), and magic systems. I guess its something akin to 'thinking outside of the box'.


message 13: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments Her Royal Orangeness wrote: "Ellie, I'm not sure how we're misunderstanding each other. :) My comment was in no way intended as an attack against you!

What I meant to say is that "most people" say that Joyce is ridiculously ..."


I'm sorry-I knew I was being defensive when I responded but my pride got in the way! :$ *blush*


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) @Ellie - Ah, the joys of internet communication...when what you say isn't quite what you meant and you lose all the help of tonal and body language clues. ;) No worries! (hugs)


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Ice wrote: "I have found myself running out of interesting book series to read..."

If you run out of series (serieses?), why not just read stand-alone books?


message 16: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments HRO-thanks :D


message 17: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments this question demands going back to my journal, I'm not sure if Calamity Physics and Sacred Hunger were read in Nov dec or january. Amazing I read then about two weeks apart.
If they do not qualify, then its got to be Shantaram, but also the book I'm just finishing, Savage Dreams.

Ice I sent you a series recommendation.
I have checked and also dont see the doris lessing series on your shelves (could have missed it, you've so many)Canopus in Argos: Archives
so I am adding that here.Melanie Rawn is excellent but Doris is mind bogglingm especially if you read the whole series in order.


message 18: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments Thanks - I have found that fantasy writers have little or no concept of less than 2 related books, although in some instances they should have.


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Magdelanye wrote: "I have checked and also dont see the doris lessing series on your shelves (could have missed it, you've so many)"

Mag - you do know there's a search box for people's shelves? Up in the right hand corner? You can type in a title or an author and the results will show what the person has shelved. And then you can click the column headers to sort the results, like you can sort by rating to see what book by a certain author they rated the highest.

Magdelanye wrote: "I'm not sure if Calamity Physics and Sacred Hunger were read in Nov dec or january."

I own both of these and can't wait to read them! In fact, Physics is on the Reading Plan for November. ;)


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Here are my answers to the topic question.

Three classics earned 5 Stars: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Awakening, and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

In contemporary literature, two books earned 5 Stars:

The Art of Disappearing A Novel by Ivy Pochoda
The Art of Disappearing by Ivy Pochoda
Gorgeous writing. Unique plot. Stunning, heartbreaking, unforgettable. Amazing achievement for a first novel.

Lark and Termite by Jayne Anne Phillips
Lark and Termite by Jayne Anne Phillips
Original and creative, both in style and plot. Compelling and emotional. (It was one of five finalists for the National Book Award in fiction, and the author's previous novel MotherKind was longlisted for the 2001 Orange Prize.)


message 21: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments Her Royal Orangeness wrote: "Here are my answers to the topic question.

Three classics earned 5 Stars:


Are you saying that you have read or reread all the above books this year? Referring to these classics.

HRO added>>P.S. I should re-name this thread "James Joyce" and start a new one about our favorite books of the year...lol

Could you, YRO, pull out the discussion following Kinkajous vote or preference more like, of Dubliners that gets into a discussion about reading Joyce...we need a place for this kind of discussion.Favorite books sounds good for a name, it would be lovely if you could do the fancy editing. I haven't yet figured out quite how to use folders, but it would be nice to have one for each author we want, anyone being able to start a new one.
I would like to contribute to this discussion myself, but will wait until changes.

I need to add Soldier of the Great War to my great list read in the last 6 months.

Black Tickets is one of my favorite books...I love her unique turn of mind...


message 22: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments Ice wrote: "Thanks - I have found that fantasy writers have little or no concept of less than 2 related books, although in some instances they should have."

In fact, Doris lessing rocked the feminist world when she started publishing this series. It was an amazing departure for a south African writer of serious womens fiction. You should also, if you are not familiar with her work, check into her golden notebook series that begins with Martha Quest, which is actually the most nearly conventional book she ever wrote.But her writing improves with each book and the last two books in that series are awesome. But this is getting dangerously close to a comment for another folder.

HRO kindly pointed out>> And then you can click the column headers to sort the results, like you can sort by rating to see what book by a certain author they rated the highest.

For me comparing books by rating is the most interesting part of the process..I am not sure what column headers you refer to, I need to investigate.


message 23: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments My tbr list is expanding quickly - I might even have to invest in a kindle to keep up - 'sleepless of New York' will love that.

:-)

Always grateful to plug the gaps in my reading knowledge. ++

I wish you could save a draft of these messages - I was fishing for a complement for all of you more experienced/(semi) professional wordsmiths, without trying to use words like heavy, wider and broader (bookshelves).


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Magdelanye wrote: "Are you saying that you have read or reread all the above books this year? Referring to these classics."

Yes. I read these classics for the first time this year.


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Magdelanye wrote: "I haven't yet figured out quite how to use folders, but it would be nice to have one for each author we want, anyone being able to start a new one."

Go all the way to the bottom of the page and click "More discussions"
Then at the top of the page, to the right, click "Edit folders"
Click on "Add a folder."

Only you, as a moderator, can create folders. I think there's a way to change the settings, though, so that anyone can.

Why don't you create a James Joyce folder, and then I'll move stuff for you?


message 26: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments Her Royal Orangeness wrote: "Magdelanye wrote: "I haven't yet figured out quite how to use folders, but it would be nice to have one for each author we want, anyone being able to start a new one."


I have tried a couple of times but with these solid directions,I will give it another go.
Probably not now, because I'm just home to eat and change and off to a jazz concert.

I am impressed with your diligence.



message 27: by Ice, Pilgrim (last edited Jun 29, 2011 01:15AM) (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments The solution seems to be to make HRO a moderator for the group.

We will then have to bow even lower :-)


message 28: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments I'm willing to scrape! :)


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) LOL at all of you! :D

There was once some movie or TV show with a scene of people bowing before some dignitary and waving their hands and chanting, "Os Sa Mama! Os Sa Mama! Os Sa Mama!" (or something that sounded like that). For years afterward, amongst some friends, "Oh Salami" was like a code phrase for being obsequious.

My point being...I had a mental picture of all of you as cartoon figures chanting "Oh Salami!" :D


message 30: by Ellie (new)

Ellie (elliearcher) | 1245 comments today's random remark: I love salami


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Kinkajou wrote: "HRS = Her Royal Salaminess :)"

Well, aren't you funny? Brat. :b


message 32: by Her Royal Orangeness (last edited Jun 29, 2011 09:17AM) (new)

Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Ellie wrote: "today's random remark: I love salami"

lol

(Hard salami, or genoa salami, or the bologna-like kind with peppercorns?)


message 33: by Her Royal Orangeness (last edited Jun 29, 2011 12:51PM) (new)

Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Kinkajou wrote: "This is what you get for bringing up salami, HRS, er, HRO ;)"

I take no responsibility for any bringing of salami. ;)


Her Royal Orangeness (onlyorangery) Kinkajou wrote: "Not touching that, nope ;)"

Methinks the subject doth need changing... ;)


message 35: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments OMG, I'm away for a few hours and it seems we've had our first revolt, Our Royal Orangeness has become a salami, and who knows where this will lead, far off the flight path for this discussion anyways....oh yes, best book...and providing folders...and HROS? being co-moderator.

In fact I did everything BUT beg her right from the get go to assume that position, but I guess she was waiting to see if it was going to fly. I think we are just beginning and have the potential to soar:)This is a remarkable group in a number of ways and I am enjoying finding so many kindred spirits.
It would be fun to map our different places we're logging in from.

HRO was the first person I told about this group and she is the one who got it off the ground. I am thrilled to have her make this committment and trust that everyone else will approve. I also would like to see everyone to be able to add their own topics for folders if thats possible, so that, for eg. if something is slightly off topic but vitally interesting to some people, like salami,or evolution, or a particular author they can just open a folder. How's that?


message 36: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (last edited Jun 30, 2011 07:37AM) (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments Kinkajou wrote:
When I was pregnant I craved salami, tomato, American cheese & Miracle Whip sandwiches like some people crave crack..."


For me it was pizza with salami, olives, and green peppers. There must be some special ingrediant in salami that is especially addictive and possibly nourishing.

Now that I have been macrobiotic for over 30 years (gee, theres probably people here that have not been alive that long!) I find I never crave cheese or even miss it, but I do miss salami and content myself with the faintly odious salami substitutes from time to time. >>HROS please note: this comment flagged for potential salami folder<<


message 37: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments Magdelanye wrote: "OMG...

Perhaps guilty for the evolution, yet not a revolution too far.

Logging in during 'computer screen breaks' at work !?

:-?



message 38: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments Ice wrote: "Perhaps guilty for the evolution, yet not a revolution too far.

Logging in during 'computer screen breaks' at work !?

:-?"
The bookstore where I work is not even wired for internet. Our cash register is an old silverware divider and a old handheld calculator.
I carry no devices, have never visited a chat room or seen porn on the internet. I have played a game once or twice in a video mall and on the ferry. I am barely computer literate. I type with 6 fingers, sometimes just 4. I cannot for the life of me read a computer book. Really I am just winging it.

evolution is part of the great cosmic revolution, wouldn't you agree?


message 39: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (neilar) | 756 comments For me evolution is revolution in slow motion (in an expanding universe perhaps)


message 40: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (last edited Jul 03, 2011 01:02AM) (new)

Magdelanye | 2339 comments exactement


back to top