Men's Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Chris, Founder (new)

Chris (cfelix) | 67 comments Mod
I was just wondering if anyone has read any books that are for "women" or for "children". Sometimes stereotypes are put on books, while they seem like they would be a good book to read.

Has anyone read some that they would like to admit to? No judgment from me!


message 2: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Fuller (sirfuller) "The Help" and it was really good. I also read "Sarah's Key" I normally don't read the girly books but was given both for Christmas.


message 3: by P. Christopher (last edited Jul 20, 2011 07:59AM) (new)

P. Christopher Colter (countofbluecars) | 12 comments As a former schoolteacher, I still have an eye for quality children's literature. There is no shame in reading books primarily geared toward kids. Just as in any other category of literature, there are children's book that are total crap, and children's books that can move you deeply. One of my all time favorite books geared toward kids is Jerry Spinelli's Maniac Magee. And I am not ashamed to admit that I loved the Harry Potter series, especially the first three books.


message 4: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Fuller (sirfuller) Phoenix wrote: "As a former schoolteacher, I still have an eye for quality children's literature. There is no shame in reading books primarily geared toward kids. Just as in any other category of literature, the..."
I agree. I loved the Harry Potter series too!


message 5: by Chris, Founder (new)

Chris (cfelix) | 67 comments Mod
I have read the first couple Harry Potter books a few years ago and they were great. I think I'm going to go back and read those two and then continue the series!

For some reason I've been wanting to read The Hunger Games. Sure it was written for teens and is classified as such, but the whole story just seems interesting to me. I may have to give it a shot at some point!


message 6: by Dan (new)

Dan Evans | 8 comments Chris wrote: "I have read the first couple Harry Potter books a few years ago and they were great. I think I'm going to go back and read those two and then continue the series!

For some reason I've been wantin..."


Good way to spend the summer!

I hear these books will be out in ebook form in October.


message 7: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Fuller (sirfuller) Chris wrote: "I have read the first couple Harry Potter books a few years ago and they were great. I think I'm going to go back and read those two and then continue the series!

For some reason I've been wantin..."


I enjoyed Hunger Games however, I felt that it should've been a bit longer with more detail. But in the end, it's an interesting read.


message 8: by Paul (new)

Paul (psinderson) | 10 comments I've read the "Hunger Games" books and loved them. Very easy to read and I enjoyed the whole idea. I read the first couple "Harry Potter" books and then have watched every movie. I think books for children and young adults can certainly resonate with us as adults and they can revive some of our own memories.


message 9: by Terry (new)

Terry Parker (parker19713) | 8 comments The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman and The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly kind of reach across the teen/adult literature line also. Both are semi-supernatural.

I listened to/read Harry Potter up thru book 5 or so. Very good, they just got longer and longer. My kids won't read them though.

Hoot by Carl Hiaasen was funny and interesting also. Keeper by Mal Peet was an interesting book with a soccer/coming of age book that I read with my son when he was about 9 or 10. He loved it.


message 10: by P. Christopher (new)

P. Christopher Colter (countofbluecars) | 12 comments The Graveyard Book is on my To-Read list. It sounds interesting. Maybe one to check out around Halloween?


message 11: by Andy (new)

Andy | 134 comments The Way of the Warrior (Young Samurai, #1) by Chris Bradford
The Young Samarai series by Chris Bradford made a huge impression on my son. In fact I've never seen him read so voraciously! It's being touted as the new Harry Potter, with Disney really interested...


message 12: by T.W. (new)

T.W. Barton | 5 comments How to Dress a Monster is a children's book. Not sure if this really fits your description of children's book from the discussion it seems like you may mean young adult or teens books.

It's a short book but the neighbor kids loved it.


message 13: by Victor (last edited Apr 30, 2015 03:56PM) (new)

Victor (ace-geek) Well as a teenager I read Tithe and its two sequels, and Faerie Wars along with its sequels. And most of Anne Rice's vampire series, which I think is geared more towards a female audience.


message 14: by Tom (new)

Tom | 13 comments I was one of the ones who was at opening day for the Harry Potter book releases. Loved that series. Hunger Games was awesome but I can't bring myself to watch the movies for some reason. But I think Roald Dahl is one of the greatests


message 15: by Tom (new)

Tom | 13 comments As for girly books I just read Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe and loved it. I enjoy Stephanie Plum stories by Janet Evanovich


message 16: by Bill, Admin (new)

Bill K | 115 comments Mod
I'm happy to hear that, Tom. My wife picked up a copy of Fried Green Tomatoes at a library sale, but I've been putting off reading it thinking that it would be too 'girly' to enjoy. Now I'll have to reconsider...


message 17: by David (new)

David Black | 21 comments I've read plenty of stereotypically "girly" books, including the aforementioned Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe and The Color Purple. I also enjoy Anne Tyler's and Barbara Kingsolver's novels which typically have a feminine POV.
I guess I'm kind of a book whore--I'll read just about anything that I think is good, regardless of genre or author.


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