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The Dickens Project - Archives > The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club - Chapters 21-23

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Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
This is the folder for your comments and discussion of the Part 8 of the group read of Charles Dickens' The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. Enjoy!


toria (vikz writes) (victoriavikzwrites) This section is a mixture of tragedy and comedy. I can see a glimpse of Little Dorrit within the debtor story. This whole chapter is full of the grotesque and sad. Then Dickens follows it with a chapter that is pure farce. Why do you think Dickens includes these tales of the Inns of Temple?


message 3: by MadgeUK (last edited Jun 27, 2011 03:26PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Yes, he used his personal experience of his father's time in debtor's prison both here and in Little Dorrit. The tales of the Inns of Temple are rather like the ones concerning the Dept of Circumlocution in Little Dorritt and are cocking a snook at the Law. After all, the phrase 'the law is an ass' originated with Dickens, in Oliver Twist: "If the law supposes that," said Mr. Bumble, squeezing his hat emphatically in both hands, "the law is a ass- a idiot. If that's the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is, that his eye may be opened by experience- by experience." Dickens felt very strongly about the ridiculous laws surrounding debtors and the prisons which housed them:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshals...


message 4: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments Of all the tales so far, The Old Man's Tale About the Queer Client has been my favorite.

Tragedy. Revenge.

It also points to that lack of compassion that people have towards those who have fallen on very rough times. We still see it today to some extent, although thanks to people like Dickens, we have safety nets.


message 5: by Diana (new)

Diana | 21 comments What I like mostly is the important part Sam is starting to play. I don't know why, but I didn't trust him at first, but now, I could not imagine the book without him :) He is such a loyal being and you can see how protective he is of Pickwick.


message 6: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments The Victorians fell in love with Sam and it was his character which established Dickens' reputation.


message 7: by Diana (new)

Diana | 21 comments I am falling in love with Sam too! :) And it his book as well, kind of..


toria (vikz writes) (victoriavikzwrites) I agree Sam is really coming into his own now. I love his father too.


message 9: by MadgeUK (last edited Jul 01, 2011 04:45PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Here is a list of the top ten Dickens characters with something about Sam:-

http://uktv.co.uk/yesterday/stepbyste...

And here is a little Royal Doulton statuette of him worth around £100:-

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/im...

Sam Weller first appeared in the August 1836 edition of the New Monthly Magazine. From then on its sales shot up and Dickens was signed up by the publisher Bentley to become one of their regular authors.

Here is a nice illustration of Sam and his Dad:-

http://www.victorianweb.org/art/illus...


message 10: by Lynnm (new)

Lynnm | 3027 comments I didn't trust Sam at first either, but like everyone, just love both the "Vellers". :-)


message 11: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (deborahkliegl) | 4456 comments Mod
I'm enjoying Sam too. Love his loyalty and really enjoy his little quips. He has the common sense that the Pickwickians lack. In trying to catch up, I actually went a bit too far so I'm not going to add many new comments for fear of spoilers.


message 12: by Diana (new)

Diana | 21 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Here is a list of the top ten Dickens characters with something about Sam:-

http://uktv.co.uk/yesterday/stepbyste...

And here is a little Royal Doulton statuette of him worth around £100..."


Thank you for these!!! :)


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