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Authors > Patricia A. McKillip

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message 1: by Bill (last edited Jun 26, 2011 08:22AM) (new)

Bill (kernos) | 350 comments FYI, Patricia McKillip wrote the leading article in the current issue of Locus called "Fairy Tale Matters".
The tropes of mythology and symbolism are the basics. It's like notation in music: you can change it in really wacky ways, but the sound is always the same, the sound is always there. But as long as we need these symbols, then the stories will be written. If we destroy the old symbols, then we might just have to come up with new ones—who knows?
I'm not sure I agree with her, but I am reading 'symbols' as 'archetypes' which may change in emphasis over time but can't be destroyed, IMO.

Much of the article is about her telling how hard it was to write The Bards of Bone Plain, my next novel.


message 2: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments I can see what she means. There are a lot of ideas/plots that change in some ways but stay the same.

The coming of age story
the long trek to save the world
the magical item
etc


message 3: by Bets (new)

Bets (betsdavies) Archetypes and symbols are supposed to be deeply imbedded in the collective unconscious of a culture. Therefore, these should not change, or change incredibly slowly. Our culture is still based on much of the same unconscious tropes it has been for hundreds of years.


message 4: by Bill (new)

Bill (kernos) | 350 comments Is it culture or genetics? Though archetypes may manifest differently among cultures, I suspect there is a strong genetic component to their existence.


Brenda ╰☆╮    (brnda) | 1409 comments Kernos wrote: "FYI, Patricia McKillip wrote the leading article in the current issue of Locus called "Fairy Tale Matters".The tropes of mythology and symbolism are the basics. It's like notation in music: you can..."

Interesting....

Haven't read Bards....yet.



One of my favorites, however, isThe Bell at Sealey Head.
Has a beautiful cover.
The Bell at Sealey Head by Patricia A. McKillip


Brenda ╰☆╮    (brnda) | 1409 comments She has characters that come across as lighthearted.
They are reads I enjoy when I want comfort.
I'm not saying there isn't conflict, but the character's are very familial.

She is definitely another author people miss out on.


message 7: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) One of my favorite authors.


Brenda ╰☆╮    (brnda) | 1409 comments Kathy wrote: "One of my favorite authors."

:)

Do you have a favorite, among her books?


message 9: by Mina (new)

Mina Khan (spicebites) | 141 comments The Bell at Sealey Head is one of my favorites too. The hubby introduced me to Patricia McKillip's works :)

And yes, I agree I think the known archetypes resonate through changes and twists, but the original essence still comes through. Coming up with an original symbol that has the same staying emotional power throughout the ages would be hard...but, wow, it'd be an awesome achievement!


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