Dance Hall of the Dead (Leaphorn & Chee, #2) Dance Hall of the Dead discussion


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Southwest High Desert Murder Mystery

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message 1: by Jane (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:01PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jane Love all Tony Hillerman novels set in high desert of New Mexico and Arizona tribal lands. The Navajo culture of living in beauty and harmony add ironic balance to all his novels which entail murder, witchcraft and condescending Anglos. Was happy to find this older novel which I hadn't read.


Kathy I have quite a few of these, I love them all. I especially enjoy when the Native police show up the, as you say, condescending Anglos and solve the mystery/murder/mayhem where the whites could not have because of their lack of cultural understanding.


Janice Dickerson I also have a large collection of these books, I love them. They always have more than just one mystery going and sometimes justice is served but not in the way the Anglos would see it.


Martin Hill Tony Hillerman was a master. I loved how he could paint the environment of the desert and the Navajo culture. He is missed.


Shaun Ryan Always been a fan of Hillerman and his characters. Besides him being a master of the mystery genre, his work resonates with me big time. I grew up in Navajo and Apache Counties, in AZ, and later moved across the line to Catron County, NM. That country is magical, is like nowhere else in the world, imbued with spirits I've never encountered elsewhere, despite having traveled most of North America extensively. I also spent two summers working on the Navajo reservation, installing landscape irrigation for teacher housing in Chinle, Many Farms, and Tsaile.

I too discovered this book recently and was pleased.


David A. Guess I'm the odd reader out here.
I read two in the series, Dancehall Of The Dead and The First Eagle and thought they were just okay. Started a third one (can't remember the title) and just couldn't get into it so I stopped reading him. There were things about the books I liked--Martin's comment about painting the environment of the desert and Navajo culture--but didn't find the story as a whole interesting enough to continue.


message 7: by Karen (last edited Jan 27, 2013 07:55PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Karen I would heartily agree these are great books, I started them and couldn't stop reading, they are like popcorn! I had a relative that worked in Albuquerque and I would get to go with them once in a while to company functions. I had also traveled through other parts of New Mexico & Arizona on family trips. It helped give me a mental picture of the places he was describing in whatever book I was reading. Loved learning about Navajo culture through these books, highly recommend them.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

I suppose this series of books would grab those who have an affinity with desert landscapes, minimalist cultures and the southwest in general. Having a love of all these, I can't get enough of the Hillerman stories about Jim Chee and Lt. Leaphorn. Hillerman's daughter did an excellent book along the same theme about the spiderwoman's daughter...if you like these books, check hers out too.


Rory I am a Hillerman disciple. As a new author I would love to generate the following and dedication of readers that Tony Hillerman inspired. I listened a while back to an NPR interview with him in 2008 or so . . . and then they mentioned that Hillerman had passed away. I felt a great loss - Mostly that there would be no more Hillerman novels. Interestingly he grew up on a farm and rode to school daily on the bus with many Indian children from the reservation. The Townie kids always lumped him with the Reservation kids even though he was not Native American. He said he always had a place in his heart for them though and it seemed to stem from his early childhood experiences. What a great story teller. RIP Tony


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Rory wrote: "I am a Hillerman disciple. As a new author I would love to generate the following and dedication of readers that Tony Hillerman inspired. I listened a while back to an NPR interview with him in 200..." I agree with all you said about Hillerman and recommend you read his daughter's addition to the southwest native american genre, "Spider Woman's Daughter".


Karen Pauline wrote: "Rory wrote: "I am a Hillerman disciple. As a new author I would love to generate the following and dedication of readers that Tony Hillerman inspired. I listened a while back to an NPR interview wi..."
I've got a copy of Spider Woman's daughter, given to me recently. I will definitely be reading it :)


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Karen wrote: "Pauline wrote: "Rory wrote: "I am a Hillerman disciple. As a new author I would love to generate the following and dedication of readers that Tony Hillerman inspired. I listened a while back to an ..." I'm sure you will like it, she's an excellent writer and she's stayed within the "style" her dad used. Good book.


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