The Inklings discussion

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Is there any modern C.S.Lewis for today?

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message 1: by Karen L. (new)

Karen L. My husband and I were having a conversation with some good friends and Lewis fans who love all of his books but particularly his books of faith. We were all amazed at his ability to speak of faith to the intellectual, the child and the common man. He just had this down to earth quality about him. He was also so wise and seemed to speak truths that today seem still so relevant. He spoke to Protestants, Catholics and even touched atheists. Is there another Christian writer or voice for this generation? We all thought and could not come up with any names.

Does anyone think there is another Lewis for today? If so WHO?


message 2: by Skylar (new)

Skylar Burris (skylarburris) Some give N.T. Wright that credit (he's been called a modern C.S. Lewis), but I don't know that he has spoken to children. I don't think there's anyone today who has done quite what Lewis has done...but then, there are no Chesterton's either...It was a unique age.


message 3: by Karen L. (new)

Karen L. A.L.,

He has inspired so many people. That is so cool how he inspired you. There is time for you to grow and develop as a writer. Maybe someday you will be the next Lewis! My husband and I fell like he has discipled us in our faith, and given us the ability to hold on to childhood imagination.


message 4: by Lauren (new)

Lauren (inklings) | 3 comments One could argue, I suppose, that Ravi Zacharias is a modern Lewis- without the childrens' books.


message 5: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments Perhaps Peter Kreeft, a Catholic who is well received by Protestants


message 6: by Marissa (new)

Marissa Johnson | 1 comments I've struggled with this question as well. I am deeply in love with the Narnia series, and I long for another work which speaks so deeply of faith while also instilling in the reader a sense of wonder and awe. Recently, I came across the book "In and Out of the Moon" by Jeff McInnis. Although I am only halfway through the book at present, it is very reminiscent of Narnia, and I would recommend it for any fan of C.S. Lewis.


message 7: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments Marissa, very glad to hear it. Thanks.
Stan


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you for the heads up on "In and Out of The Moon." I am constantly looking for books with the Narnian flavor -- not something necessarily just like those books, but something with the same sense of wonder, adventure, and genuine goodness woven throughout. So many books in the fantasy genre disappoint that I've almost given up (although I do highly recommend Susan Cooper's THE DARK IS RISING, not necessarily the entire series but that book specifically -- she hit a home run with that one). I noticed that "In and Out of The Moon" is also available on Audible, read by the author in a sort of dry but very much a storytime kind of voice. The sample had me captivated. I prefer audiobooks and very well may buy this one.


message 9: by Roy (new)

Roy (newenglandhiker) | 6 comments As a student of Lewis and, to a lesser extent, the other Inklings, I don't know of anyone who has the depth and breadth that Lewis brought (and still brings) to individuals. Even 50+ years after his death he still speaks as if he's in the room with a comfortable chair and a cup of tea - or in the pub having an intense discussion.


message 10: by Roy (new)

Roy (newenglandhiker) | 6 comments However, someone who speaks for the Christian believer today is Eric Metaxas. He is an author who now has a radio broadcast, is a frequent speaker on news outlets, and a regular commentator through a variety of media (would Lewis be on Twitter today?). Metaxas, like Lewis, is an unabashed apologist and the author of children's books, as well as a variety of other genres (no science fiction, yet, at least of which I am aware). If, 50 years after his death, people are still talking about Metaxas as a force for apologetics and faith, we will know that he has begun to measure up to Lewis.


message 11: by David (last edited Dec 01, 2018 01:22PM) (new)

David Jack (smeagolthemagnificent) | 7 comments In an odd kind of way, Lewis's master George MacDonald might be the new, Lewis-like voice for this generation, despite the fact that he predates Lewis. People are starting to rediscover him now, with documentaries like The Fantasy Makers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOg_B... and new versions of his works becoming available. I've done my own humble bit to contribute to this, with translations of his Scottish novels to make them accessible to those who would otherwise find the Aberdeenshire dialect too difficult to negotiate:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYZ19...


message 12: by Micah (new)

Micah (micahchuk) | 3 comments David wrote: "In an odd kind of way, Lewis's master George MacDonald might be the new, Lewis-like voice for this generation, despite the fact that he predates Lewis. People are starting to rediscover him now, wi..."

Thank you so much for the video links! I’m especially excited about that Fantasy Makers documentary. I might have to beg my grandmother to order a copy from Christian Book Distributors. Or maybe she’ll do it without my asking!

As to a modern-day Lewis—I can’t help there. I’d have to be crazy about Lewis to comment. In my honest opinion, there has always been a very real space between Lewis’s outstretched hand and George MacDonald’s coattail. I have heard of Metaxas, and I knew that he wrote scripts for VeggieTales and admired Lewis—but that’s about it.


message 13: by David (new)

David Jack (smeagolthemagnificent) | 7 comments You're welcome Micah! It's an excellent documentary, and one of the chief contributors, Dr Kirstin Jeffrey Johnson, happens to endorse my new translation of MacDonald's Sir Gibbie. I love Lewis, but I agree with you entirely that he was hanging on to GM's coat tails. That's no disrespect to Lewis-he said something essentially the same himself when he called GM his "master", and acknowledged that he quoted him in every book. Any serious Lewis reader SHOULD read MacDonald, and will not only find even greater spiritual depth (at least in my opinion, and I think Lewis would say the same) but will find their understanding of Lewis enriched given the obvious debt he owed the Scotsman.


message 14: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments I confess I have not read MacDonald except Lewis's anthology. But I plan to. I am a rare book dealer and recently I found a beautiful copy of Phantastes in a nice dust jacket. It was the first printing that included the Arthur Hughes illustrations and...the cool thing...it contained son Greville MacDonald's bookplate!


message 15: by Micah (new)

Micah (micahchuk) | 3 comments Stan wrote: "I confess I have not read MacDonald except Lewis's anthology. But I plan to. I am a rare book dealer and recently I found a beautiful copy of Phantastes in a nice dust jacket. It was the first prin..."

Oh wow, that sounds like a prize! You’d get a good price for that one, I’m sure. But if I were you, I might not let it out of my sight!


message 16: by David (last edited Dec 03, 2018 06:38PM) (new)

David Jack (smeagolthemagnificent) | 7 comments Stan, you may not be aware, if you are new to MacDonald, that Greville's bookplate is an imitation of his father's: the same image and motto, ("Corage! God Mend Al!") only with different latin words on the left hand part of the door frame. I use the original bookplate in my translations of MacDonald's Scottish novels-in the introductory pages, along with quotes from Lewis, Chesterton and others, to make people feel they're on familiar territory!


message 17: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments Thanks for the info - I may use that in my catalog description!


message 18: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments I would love to hang on to it but I have to put the good stuff in my next catalog.


message 19: by Micah (new)

Micah (micahchuk) | 3 comments Stan wrote: "I would love to hang on to it but I have to put the good stuff in my next catalog."

Is your catalog online?


message 20: by Stan (new)

Stan Shelley | 45 comments I recently read Back of the North Wind. It is not really my favorite genre but MacDonald's writing skills easily held me. I think you are on my mail list but if not you can sign up at www.shelleyandsonbooks.com


message 21: by Shannon (new)

Shannon (shannonkay) Timothy Keller! The first book of his that I read was The Prodigal God, and it definitely put me in mind of C.S. Lewis.


message 22: by David (new)

David Jack (smeagolthemagnificent) | 7 comments Douglas Gresham writes in the intro to my latest George MacDonald translation: “ 'Malcolm' is one of George MacDonald’s best books. Indeed, I am convinced my Step-father’s using the title “Letters To Malcolm” for one of his books, is in tribute to George MacDonald’s usage of the name in this one."

Here's the book itself (which is also endorsed by Owen Barfield's grandson): Malcolm


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Malcolm (other topics)

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