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HEALTH- MEDICINE - SCIENCE > HEALTH-MEDICINE-SCIENCE: BEST OF THE BEST

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 16, 2017 06:58PM) (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
What books from the Health-Science-Medicine area really influenced you the most or had the greatest impact on you?

Make sure to always add the bookcover, the author's photo when available and always the author's link (which is the author's name in linkable text).

Here is an example of what your citation should look like:

Stiff The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach by Mary Roach Mary Roach

Tell us also why this book was so great from your viewpoint.


message 2: by Bea (new)

Bea | 1830 comments It may have been my youth, or the times, but I think The Naked Ape is the science book that impressed me most at the time I read it. I went on and on about it to friends, many of whom eventually told me to shut up already about how people were like apes.

The Naked Ape A Zoologist's Study of the Human Animal by Desmond Morris by Desmond Morris Desmond Morris


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
You are making me smile with your story.


message 4: by Bea (new)

Bea | 1830 comments My mother was a devout Roman Catholic and I had received the best Catholic upbringing available while attending a public school. The idea that people and animals had anything fundamentally in common was a major revelation to me, lo those many years ago. Plus, there was all that semi-salacious sex stuff ...


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Oh dear the nuns and all - none of this and none of that. You are making me smile Bea. People and Apes - it sounds somewhat like the Scopes Trial.


message 6: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Bentley, when one gets an email about this thread all that one sees is that the title is "Best of the Best"; you do not know that it is under the theme of medicine. This is very confusing; it is difficult to know if one should open it or not! Wouldn't it be less confusing of the title were "Medicine-Best of the Best"?

Just a sugestion. This is what I was trying to explain before!


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Chrissie wrote: "Bentley, when one gets an email about this thread all that one sees is that the title is "Best of the Best"; you do not know that it is under the theme of medicine. This is very confusing; it is di..."

See you point Chrissie - I believe I fixed it.


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Sugar in products. How to cut down on sugar in your diet.


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
All of us do


message 10: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) What a great post, Kathy!!!!


message 11: by Karen (new)

Karen (karinlib) The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee

I read this book a few years and just loved the writing. This history on cancer was very informative. I kept thinking: if only more doctors would write.


message 12: by Dave (new)

Dave | 513 comments Karen wrote: "The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha MukherjeeSiddhartha Mukherjee

I read this book a few years and just loved the writing. This hi..."


FYI: This book will be on television in late March 2015 - a 3-part PBS series produced by Ken Burns,


message 13: by Ann D (new)

Ann D Karen,
I agree with you about The Emperor of All Maladies. I read mostly fiction, but this book was absolutely fascinating.

The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee


message 14: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) @Dave.....thanks for the tip on the Ken Burns PBS upcoming series. I have not read the book, so I may just wait for the television production. If it is Ken Burns, you can be assured that it will be quality.


message 15: by Lakshmi (new)

Lakshmi Hayagriva Return to the Brain of Eden: Restoring the Connection between Neurochemistry and Consciousness

Return to the Brain of Eden Restoring the Connection between Neurochemistry and Consciousness by Tony Wright by Tony Wright, Graham Gynn, Dennis J. McKenna (no photos)

Synopsis:

An exploration of our fall from the pinnacle of human evolution 200,000 years ago and how we can begin our return

• Explores recent neurological and psychological research on the brain and the role of plant biochemistry in human brain expansion

• Explains how humanity’s prehistoric diet change led to a neurodegenerative condition characterized by aggression and a fearful perception of the world

• Outlines a strategy of raw foods, tantric sexuality, shamanic practices, and entheogens to reverse our mental degeneration and restore our advanced abilities

Over a period of a million years the human brain expanded at an increasingly rapid rate, and then, 200,000 years ago, the expansion abruptly stopped. Modern science has overlooked this in order to maintain that we are at the pinnacle of our evolution. However, the halt in brain expansion explains not only recently uncovered anomalies within the human brain but also the global traditions of an earthly paradise lost and of humanity’s degeneration from our original state of perpetual wonder and joy.

Drawing on more than 20 years of research, authors Tony Wright and Graham Gynn explore how our modern brains are performing far below their potential and how we can unlock our higher abilities and return to the euphoria of Eden. They explain how for millions of years early forest-dwelling humans were primarily consuming the hormone-rich sex organs of plants--fruit--each containing a highly complex biochemical cocktail evolved to influence DNA transcription, rapid brain development, and elevated neural and pineal gland activity. Citing recent neurological and psychological studies, the authors explain how the loss of our symbiotic fruit-based diet led to a progressive neurodegenerative condition characterized by aggressive behaviors, a fearful perception of the world, and the suppression of higher artistic, mathematical, and spiritual abilities.

The authors show how many shamanic and spiritual traditions were developed to counteract our decline. They outline a strategy of raw foods, tantric sexuality, shamanic practices, and entheogen use to reverse our degeneration, restore our connection with the plant world, and regain the bliss and peace of the brain of Eden.


message 16: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Excellent add, Lakshmi and your citations and format are right on target.


message 17: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Polio is almost unknown today but as late as 1955 it was a crippler and killer around the world, especially in children. Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine eradicated this disease for all time and became one of the greatest discoveries in modern medical history.

Splendid Solution: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio

Splendid Solution Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio by Jeffrey Kluger by Jeffrey Kluger Jeffrey Kluger

Synopsis:

With rivalries, reversals, and a race against time, the struggle to eradicate polio is one of the great tales of modern history. It begins with the birth of Jonas Salk, shortly before one of the worst polio epidemics in United States history. At the time, the disease was a terrifying enigma: striking from out of nowhere, it afflicted tens of thousands of children in this country each year and left them-literally overnight-paralyzed, and sometimes at death's door.

Salk was in medical school just as a president crippled by the disease, Franklin D. Roosevelt, was taking office-and providing the impetus to the drive for studies on polio. By the early 1950s, Salk had already helped create an influenza vaccine, and was hot on the trail of the polio virus. He was nearly thwarted, though, by the politics of medicine and by a rival researcher eager to discredit his proposed solution. Meanwhile, in 1952, polio was spreading in record numbers, with 57,000 cases in the United States that summer alone.

In early 1954, Salk was weighing the possibility of trials of a not-yet-perfected vaccine against-as the summer approached-the prospect of thousands more children being struck down by the disease. The results of the history-making trials were announced at a press conference on April 12, 1955: "The vaccine works." The room-and an entire nation-erupted in cheers for this singular medical achievement.

Salk became a cultural hero and icon for a whole generation. Now, at the fiftieth anniversary of the first national vaccination program-and as humanity is tantalizingly close to eradicating polio worldwide-comes this unforgettable chronicle. Salk's work was an unparalleled achievement-and it makes for a magnificent read.


message 18: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Kathy, this book is on my list:

The Martian by Andy Weir by Andy Weir Andy Weir


message 19: by Anca (new)

Anca | 9 comments Bentley wrote: "What books from the Health-Science-Medicine area really influenced you the most or had the greatest impact on you?

Make sure to always add the bookcover, the author's photo when available and alwa..."


This was one of the best books I ever read. I love her funny, insightful and practical way of writing style. I picked this book one month before starting the forensics rotation and it's been very helpful to know what to expect there.


message 20: by Anca (last edited Feb 12, 2015 12:43PM) (new)

Anca | 9 comments Power, Sex, Suicide Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life by Nick Lane by Nick Lane(no photo)

It was during medical school that I wondered why babies are always born young no matter the age of their parents (sure, they may be born healthy or sick, but they're always young) and this book allowed me to find an answer I couldn't get from my teachers. I understood aging better - which serves me well now studying it and caring for the elderly - and I got to appreciate mitochondria a lot more, since they are responsible for the energy I have to achieve my goals. Excellent book!


message 21: by Anca (new)

Anca | 9 comments thanks for the correction. How did you add the author's name over the link? I used add author/add/add


message 22: by Anca (new)

Anca | 9 comments ok I edited it the right way.


message 23: by Dave (new)

Dave | 513 comments This was an amazing book that hits pretty much every emotion. It's a well-researched history of cancer, and healthcare's efforts to beat it, especially in the last 100 years. It's amazing to see how crude some of these efforts were, even as recently as the 1980s and 90s. And it was downright infuriating to read of some of the most extreme surgeries that continued for sol long, mostly due to the arrogance of a few key players.

But there are also heroes aplenty, and it's encouraging to see that , as we finally better understand the nature of cancer, we're fighting it with more targeted, less harmful treatments.

Watch for a documentary by Ken Burns on your PBS stations based on this book, with info on updated treatments and more great story-telling by Burns. It will air March 30, 31 and April 1.

The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee


message 24: by Anca (new)

Anca | 9 comments I haven't finished reading the biography of cancer, but I will. It's a well-written book, totally worth it.


message 25: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Thank you very much Dave for the add and also Anna for your comment.


message 26: by Bin (last edited Apr 08, 2015 07:16AM) (new)

Bin The Making of the Atomic Bomb
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes by Richard Rhodes

The Chemistry between Us
The Chemistry Between Us Love, Sex, and the Science of Attraction by Larry Young by Larry Young


message 27: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Thanks Kathy.

Thanks Bin - just few weeks with your citations:

The Making of the Atom Bomb by Victoria Sherrow by Victoria Sherrow (no photo)

The Chemistry Between Us Love, Sex, and the Science of Attraction by Larry Young by Larry Young (no photo)

When there is no author's photo - just add (no photo) in parens.


message 28: by Francie (new)

Francie Grice Karen Day - 2015 Advance Global Australian Life Sciences Award winner

Published on Sep 15, 2015

Karen Day is a distinguished malaria researcher dedicated to the improvement of global health. Born in Melbourne, she was educated at University of Melbourne and had the “life changing” opportunity of studying the public health problems of Papua New Guineans as a young postdoctoral researcher. This experience led her to strengthen her public health training in the UK as a lecturer in molecular epidemiology at Imperial College.

She was recruited to University of Oxford in 2003 where she was promoted to Professor. She was also appointed Fellow of Hertford College in 2003, becoming one of the few women “dons” in science at Oxford.

She moved to New York University School of Medicine in 2004 where she held several senior academic administrative roles at NYU including Chair of the Department of Medical Parasitology; Director of the Institute of Urban and Global Health, coordinating global health activities at the Medical School; she led the development of a Masters Program in Global Public Health in the time when the Millenium Development Goals were inspiring governments, NGOs and citizens to participate to reduce global poverty and disease.

She joined the University of Melbourne in 2014 as the Dean of Science to lead Australia’s premier Science Faculty. In addition, she continues to run a malaria research group based in the Bio21 Institute and School of BioSciences.

She is an Emeritus Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford and a member of NYU Society of Fellows. Professor Day is also an expert on higher education, having experience in UK, USA and Australian Universities. She is passionate about science and solving problems in global health.

Held at the iconic Sydney Opera House on 14 September, The Advance Global Australian Summit and Awards celebrated international Australians who exhibit remarkable talent, exceptional vision and ambition. The Awards are the only of its kind to recognise the contributions of the one million Australians living abroad, and those who have returned home. More information at www.globalaustralianawards.com.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnZI1...

Source: YouTube


message 29: by Rose (last edited Oct 18, 2016 11:42AM) (new)

Rose | 25 comments I enjoyed reading

Kill or Cure An Illustrated History of Medicine by Steve Parker by Steve Parker (no photo),

The Great Mortality An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly by John Kelly John Kelly,

and

Guns, Germs, and Steel The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond by Jared Diamond Jared Diamond.

My reviews: (and why I liked reading these books)

All three feature a timeline (detailed and partial) of medical breakthroughs and discoveries.

The Black Plague (which I find very interesting) is featured in all three titles, with references made toward the impact the pandemic left on European society as a whole. At the very Zenith of Theocratic-esque control over much of Europe, in swept the Bubonic plague like a tidal wave, and out from the flood rose the Peasant's Revolt and the beginnings of an eventual eradication of serfdom.

All three of the books mentioned cover this crucially important shift in economics, government, religion, classes and understanding of disease (and it's treatment).

- Rose


message 30: by Francie (new)

Francie Grice The Best Science Books of 2015

“Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time,” E.B. White observed in a wonderful 1969 interview. “You have to write up, not down.” What’s true of great children’s books is true of great science books, which must do three things for the reader — explain, enchant, and elevate. They must tell you what something is and why it matters, captivate you to care about it and tickle you into taking pleasure in understanding it, and leave you in a higher state of awareness regarding whatever subtle or monumental aspect of the world the book had made its subject.

After the best art books of the year, here are the most stimulating science books of 2015, possessing this trifecta of merit.

On the Move A Life by Oliver Sacks by Oliver Sacks Oliver Sacks

The Invention of Nature Alexander von Humboldt's New World by Andrea Wulf by Andrea Wulf Andrea Wulf

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randall by Lisa Randall Lisa Randall

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua by Sydney Padua Sydney Padua

The Blue Whale by Jenni Desmond by Jenni Desmond (no photo)

The Physicist and the Philosopher Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate that Changed Our Understanding of Time by Jimena Canales by Jimena Canales (no photo)

What to Think About Machines That Think Today's Leading Thinkers on the Age of Machine Intelligence by John Brockman by John Brockman John Brockman

Thunder & Lightning Weather Past, Present, Future by Lauren Redniss by Lauren Redniss (no photo)

Source: The Best Science Books of 2015


message 31: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
A Great add Francie


message 32: by Francie (new)

Francie Grice Thank you


message 34: by Ann D (new)

Ann D Thank you, Joel.

I have only read 3 of the books on your list, and the list gives me some great suggestions for future reading. My academic background in science is almost non-existent, but I would like to learn more.


message 35: by Joel (new)

Joel (joeldick) | 68 comments Ann wrote: "Thank you, Joel.

I have only read 3 of the books on your list, and the list gives me some great suggestions for future reading. My academic background in science is almost non-existent, but I woul..."


Nice! Which ones?

None of those books I listed require any background in science. Some of the math ones do, however: Leonard Wapner's is quite detailed. Prime Obsession might also be a little intimidating. Yanofsky and Dunham are moderate, but shouldn't be too bad. The other's should be no problem.


message 36: by Ann D (last edited Dec 04, 2016 07:32PM) (new)

Ann D I have read A Beautiful Mind, The Emperor of All Maladies, At Home, and A Short History of Nearly Everything, so I guess that makes 3 rather than 4. I mostly read fiction, but those books pretty much kept me glued to the page.

I just bought Mukerjee's new book, The Gene, and I am really looking forward to reading it..

A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar by Sylvia Nasar Sylvia Nasar

The Emperor of All Maladies A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee

The Gene An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee by Siddhartha Mukherjee Siddhartha Mukherjee

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson by Bill Bryson Bill Bryson

At Home A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson by by Bill Bryson Bill Bryson


message 37: by Joel (new)

Joel (joeldick) | 68 comments Awesome. I bought The Gene too, and it's sitting on my shelf, but I have a whole bunch of stuff to get to before that, like:

Napoleon's Buttons How 17 Molecules Changed History by Penny Le Couteur by Penny Le Couteur (no photo)
One Summer America, 1927 by Bill Bryson by Bill Bryson Bill Bryson
Gödel, Escher, Bach An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter by Douglas R. Hofstadter Douglas R. Hofstadter
The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes by Richard Rhodes Richard Rhodes
Climate Confusion by Roy Spencer by Roy Spencer (no photo)
Into Thin Air A Personal Account of the Mount Everest Disaster by Jon Krakauer by Jon Krakauer Jon Krakauer


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Great adds Joel


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
What books from the Health-Science-Medicine area really influenced you the most or had the greatest impact on you recently?

Make sure to always add the bookcover, the author's photo when available and always the author's link (which is the author's name in linkable text).

Here is an example of what your citation should look like:

Stiff The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach by Mary Roach Mary Roach

Tell us also why this book was so great from your viewpoint and how it influenced you?


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