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Book Discussion > Name of the Wind -- First Impressions (Prologue - Chapter 7)

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message 1: by Blue (new)

Blue (statsig) | 57 comments Mod
I'm re-reading and trying to keep in mind good breaking points for new readers. This seems like a logical one.


message 2: by Blue (new)

Blue (statsig) | 57 comments Mod
Damn do I love this book. Even on the third read, where I'm finally reaching the point where I can see a couple small quibbles I have with the way certain things are handled, this still an amazing book to me. The way things are worded makes them roll off the tongue; this is one of the few, perhaps the only, books that I feel impelled to read certain lines out loud. When I try to sell people on this book, I use the "Prologue that details the layers of silence" as an example of how this book has an eye for narration, rather than using narration as a tool to get the plot done (e.g. something like Hicks and Weis's Dragonlance books, which I loved as a middle/high-schooler but really just use words as a tool to make things happen with no flourishes).

Plus, I heart Bast.


message 3: by Wes (new)

Wes | 20 comments I read this book about a year ago on Ben's recommendation and wasn't wild about it, but I liked it enough to want to read the sequel. And that means rereading the first book, since I've forgotten most of what happened beyond the basic plot.

Right now I'm just a few pages in and I'm remembering one of the things I especially liked about it the first time through: the role of the oral tradition. There's a spot in the first chapter where the characters throw around some competing axioms ("A tinker pays for kindness twice" vs "A tinker's advice pays kindness twice") and are corrected by someone who quotes the original source, a folk rhyme.

As someone who is interested in the way language and idioms change over time, this tickled my interest.


message 4: by Wes (new)

Wes | 20 comments And now I am remembering the things I didn't like. I'm up to about chapter 10 right now, so this is maybe in the wrong place, but there's no other thread right now and I think that chapter 7 might be a little to soon to cut off anyway.

(minor story spoilers follow)


What I don't like is how easily Kvothe just picks up new abilities like they're nothing. He learns a technique called Heart of Stone, which allows one to "set aside your emotions and prejudices and let you think clearly about what-ever you wished". That seems like a very important thing, and a big source of character development--but the change takes place over all of two sentences and doesn't change Kvothe's personality at all. He might as well be writing "Dear Diary, today I learned to whistle."


message 5: by Megan (last edited Mar 17, 2011 11:34PM) (new)

Megan Story | 14 comments Mod
Wes wrote: "Right now I'm just a few pages in and I'm remembering one of the things I especially liked about it the first time through: the role of the oral tradition. There's a spot in the first chapter where the characters throw around some competing axioms ("A tinker pays for kindness twice" vs "A tinker's advice pays kindness twice") and are corrected by someone who quotes the original source, a folk rhyme."

I loved this aspect of the books as well. In my dreams Kvothe winds up as a pale, nerdy linguist in his old age.


message 6: by Blue (new)

Blue (statsig) | 57 comments Mod
It's so hard for me to remember that he isn't in his old age during the outer story. I imagine him as Kote as this scarred gruff innkeeper in his 40s or 50s (okay, that's not really old age old age, but it's older than he should be in the book) who kinda resembles Jet from Cowboy Bebop.

Yeah, I dunno either.


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