Young Adult Book Reading Challenges discussion

The Iron King (The Iron Fey, #1)
This topic is about The Iron King
91 views
The Iron King Discussions > Midsummer's Night Dream

Comments Showing 1-20 of 20 (20 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Now that you have read the book, what do you think about the similarities to it and Midsummer's Night Dream? If you haven't read Midsummer's Night Dream, will you read it after reading The Iron King?


message 2: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Some history for those that don't know it:

Oberon is the king of all of the fairies in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream who is feuding with his wife Titania, the queen of the fairies. They are fighting over a baby that Oberon wants to raise as his henchman. Titania wants to keep the baby because he is the child of Titania's mortal friend who died, and wants to raise the child for her friend. Because Oberon and Titania are powerful fairies, their arguments affect the weather.
Furious that Titania will not give him the child, he puts juice from a magical flower into her eyes while she is asleep. The effect of the juice is that it will cause Titania to fall in love with the first thing she sees. Titania awakens and finds herself madly in love with Bottom, a weaver that has been given a donkey's head by Puck. Meanwhile, two couples have entered the forest: Hermia and Lysander are pursued by Demetrius, who also loves Hermia, and Helena, who loves Demetrius. Oberon sends Puck to put some of the juice in Demetrius's eyes to make him fall in love with Helena, after he witnesses him rejecting her. When Puck puts the love potion on Lysander by mistake, and then on Demetrius, Helena finds herself loved by two men, and confusion breaks out. After Puck straightens out what he has done, and Demetrius discovers that he is really in love with Helena after all, Oberon looks upon Titania and her lover, Bottom and feels sorry for what he has done. He reverses the spell and when Titania awakes the two reunite.


message 3: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
In the Shakespeare play, Titania is a very proud creature and as much of a force to contend with as her husband Oberon. The marital quarrel she and her husband are engaged in over which of them should have the keeping of a changeling page is the engine that drives the mix ups and confusion of the other characters in the play. Due to an enchantment cast by Oberon's servant Puck, Titania magically falls in love with a rude mechanical (a lower class labourer), Nick Bottom the Weaver, who has been given the head of an ass by Puck, who feels it is better suited to his character (which bears a resemblance to the story of Lycaon).


message 4: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Puck is Oberon's servant and is sent by Oberon, who is angry with Titania the fairy queen, to fetch the flower that has been hit by cupid's arrows. Puck is then instructed by Oberon to use the love juice to fix the love entanglement occurring between the Athenian lovers who also happen to be running about in the forest. He mistakenly administers the charm to the sleeping Lysander instead of Demetrius. Puck provides Nick Bottom with a donkey's head so that Titania will fall in love with a beast and forget her attachment to the Changeling Boy, allowing Oberon to take the child from her. (Oberon does so successfully.) Later, Puck is ordered by Oberon to fix the mistake he (Puck) made, by producing a dark fog, leading the lovers astray within it by imitating their voices, and then applying the flower to Lysander's eyes, which will cause him to fall back in love with Hermia. The four lovers are then made to believe that they were dreaming what took place in the forest (hence the play's title A Midsummer Night's Dream). At the end of the play Puck makes a speech directly to the audience:

If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber'd here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Puck,
If we have unearned luck
Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Puck a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends. (Act v. Scene i.)

Puck apologizes to the audience for anything that might have offended them and suggests that they pretend it was a dream. This monologue directly addresses the audience and ties them in to the play.

During the midpoint of the play, Puck delivers one of his most memorable lines, and in turn, offers comment on both the play and on lovers in real life: "Lord, what fools these mortals be!"


Sleepy Booknerd I haven't read it, but I do kind of want to :) Perhaps one day if I ever come across a copy


Sarah Honenberger (sarahhonenberger) | 56 comments Thanks, Angie, for posting these questions and the background on Oberon, etc. You beat me to it. Sorry we don't have more readers posting.


Sarah Honenberger (sarahhonenberger) | 56 comments Lacy wrote: "I haven't read it, but I do kind of want to :) Perhaps one day if I ever come across a copy"

Shakespeare plays are free on internet.


Sleepy Booknerd I'll probably look into when I finish the series then :)


message 9: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "

Shakespeare plays are free on internet."



I didn't know that... so I went out there and found a copy, here it is!

http://www.shakespeare-literature.com...


message 10: by Rita (last edited Mar 07, 2011 09:34AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Rita Webb (ritawebb) | 77 comments Lacy wrote: "I haven't read it, but I do kind of want to :) Perhaps one day if I ever come across a copy"

Lacy, if you are not into reading Shakespeare, there is a very good movie version of Midsummer's Night Dream that I loved. I read the play a couple times before I saw the movie and then I saw it in a live performance. I have to say that Shakespeare's comedies are wonderful.

You can probably get the movie from your local library.


message 11: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
After reading this book I am going to check out the movie too. I had no interest in watching it before reading this book.


Sleepy Booknerd I might just check the movie out sometime :) If I ever make it to my library!


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments Angie wrote: "Now that you have read the book, what do you think about the similarities to it and Midsummer's Night Dream?"

I don't see any similarities with Midsummer's Night Dream. True, Oberon, Titania, Mab, and Puck appear in both but Midsummer's Night Dream has a completely different story line.


Sarah Honenberger (sarahhonenberger) | 56 comments Angie wrote: "Sarah wrote: "

Shakespeare plays are free on internet."


I didn't know that... so I went out there and found a copy, here it is!

http://www.shakespeare-literature.com......"


Free because they don't have to pay him royalties anymore. Hah.


Sarah Honenberger (sarahhonenberger) | 56 comments Grace wrote: "Angie wrote: "Now that you have read the book, what do you think about the similarities to it and Midsummer's Night Dream?"

I don't see any similarities with Midsummer's Night Dream. True, Oberon,..."


Grace: I think the author stretched it too. But it may give kids a little more exposure to a classic than they might otherwise get. There are authors who actually do a re-telling. Part of that is the classic story may be one that's not so unique after all, like Son is jealous of mother's new husband, suspicious when his father dies, as in Hamlet. And sometimes, as in my novel Catcher, Caught, I thought Holden Caulfield had so many qualities that today's readers were missing that I wanted to give a simiilar character modern issues and celebrate Salinger's brilliance in exploring the brink of adulthood that all of us experience.


Sarah Honenberger (sarahhonenberger) | 56 comments Lacy wrote: "I might just check the movie out sometime :) If I ever make it to my library!"

You're lucky if your library has funds to buy this kind of movie. My little town can't afford anything except the classic movies. Maybe streaming video will change that. I like to imagine a future where there's free wireless everywhere.


message 17: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 4 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "Grace wrote: "Angie wrote: "Now that you have read the book, what do you think about the similarities to it and Midsummer's Night Dream?"

I don't see any similarities with Midsummer's Night Drea..."


Not to go off topic here... but Sarah what is your book about?


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments Sarah wrote: "I think the author stretched it too. But it may give kids a little more exposure to a classic than they might otherwise get."

I see your point - making the connection to Midsummer's Night Dream will make some of the readers seek out that play and then, possibly, read more of Shakespeare.

Of course, Shakespeare wrote his play using characters from stories he'd heard - he didn't originate the characters of Oberon, Titania, and Puck. They were part of the myths everyone knew and told. It's necessary to go back to traditional Irish Faery Tales to meet the original characters.

I'll look for your book.


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments Sarah wrote: "You're lucky if your library has funds to buy this kind of movie. My little town can't afford anything except the classic movies. "

Many libraries rely on donations of movies to fill out their collections. Even in the city where I live, with a population of over 600,000, the public library system gratefully accepts donations of movies (as well as of books). That's why their collection of movies is fairly eclectic.


message 20: by Jenn (new)

Jenn Soehnlin I love Midsummer Night's Dream! I think it's interesting that The Iron King is set in that story world. It gives an interesting side story to the characters and fairies you meet in MND. Not sure if I like that idea, or if it would have been better if the author had created her own fairy world, but I thought it was a creative idea. :)


back to top