Always Coming Home discussion

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Shelf Porn/Library Porn

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message 1: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Oops, Sherri, I made a comment on another thread before I saw you had made this one. Disclaimer: let nothing I posted in the other thread be construed to mean that I don't fully support everyone starting whatever threads they like any time they like. I think that makes things much more fun and I'm really glad you started this one!


message 2: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Thanks! (whew) =D


message 3: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Oooh, do you love office supplies too? This is my place, these are my people.


message 4: by Phoenixfalls (new)

Phoenixfalls | 17 comments PAPERCLIPS!!!

(In jewel tones, ideally, though I'll accept neon.)

I have spent the last two or three years getting really pissed off that every time I needed a paperclip I couldn't find any. I'd think to myself "There's no way you have no paperclips in your house. No. Way." and so I'd just resolve that it was time to reorganize my desk drawers, and then forget about the whole issue until I AGAIN needed a paperclip and could not find one.

Finally, on a day off from work, I told the bf "We're going to . End of story." And I walked through the doors, into the cool, dry, dead-tree smell (distinct from the warm, dry, dead-tree smell of a good bookstore) and said "Oh, I have missed you, ! It has been too long!"

The perils of no longer being a student and having a Costco membership. No yearly trips to replenish those desk supplies you never think of until they're gone!


message 5: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Ooh I love the neon colored sticky notes. I have far more sticky notes in my house than I can use in a lifetime of note-sticking. They're just so awesome I can't resist them!

I have the paper-clip problem too. I seem to buy stuff like that regularly, but never can find one when I need them.

Another thing I adore is clean, fresh multi-subject notebooks, all thick and papery, with lovely blank, flat, pages. They're so beautiful. Somehow nothing I write in them can ever live up to those new, crisp pages, so full of promise.


message 6: by Mir (new)

Mir | 31 comments I have a magnetic paperclip holder, maybe you need one of those?

For marking books I prefer those little sticky tabs in the dispenser to post-its; true you cannot write much on then, but they stay in place better and don't get messed up in your purse.


message 7: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 03, 2011 08:21AM) (new)

Now, tell me if I'm doing something wrong or whether GR doesn't take photo links from LiveJournal. I'm breaking the link, then posting it. When I post it, you can see the description but no link:

img src="http://pics.livejournal.com/shoshana_..." width="40" height="100" alt="A case with a book from every country."/

A case with a book from every country.

Most of my home book cases are from IKEA for pragmatic reasons, since there are more than 20 of them and I used to move more frequently.


message 8: by Mir (new)

Mir | 31 comments


message 9: by Ian (new)

Ian | 42 comments Some of you know that I'm seriously in love with Iain Banks. This is the Iain Banks section on my "look-but-don't-touch" shelf:



These are all firsts, some difficult to get. Oh, and The Wasp Factory, both copies of Walking on Glass, along with Inversions, Look to Winward, and Matter are all signed by The Man hisself. That's right.

I also have an Iain Banks section on my "okay-to-read" shelf but I don't have any pics handy right now.


message 10: by Mir (last edited Mar 03, 2011 12:21PM) (new)

Mir | 31 comments I touch all my books. Even the centuries-old ones.


message 11: by Phoenixfalls (new)

Phoenixfalls | 17 comments Yeah, I can't quite get behind the "look don't touch" thing. I'm not, quite, enough into books-as-objects rather than books-as-vehicles-for-stories-I-love thing. . .

But, I do have a shelf of books that are to be read by ME ONLY, because I know how to treat them right. And any book I want my boyfriend to read I have to buy a second copy of, because he DESTROYS them. So maybe I just need more time to get there. ;D


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

So Miriam, what did you do that was different from what I did?


message 13: by Ian (last edited Mar 03, 2011 02:49PM) (new)

Ian | 42 comments The books on my "look-but-don't-touch" shelf are too valuable (mostly monetarily though partially sentimentally) to risk damage or degredation. Most of them are valuable now while others have potential. Many of them are in fine to very-fine condition; a few aren't but they're rare enough to be valuable (or have potential value) regardless. Some of them, honestly, are way beyond what I could hope to afford. My very generous parents have purchased a few for me as birthday/xmas presents, inlcuding the signed true firsts of The Wasp Factory and Walking on Glass. Indeed those are not just signed, but personally inscribed to a famous British lawyer and book collector who was murdered, so they're truly one-of-a-kind. I'm sure as hell not going to read those copies.

Each of my books on the look-but-don't-touch shelf has a corresponding less valuable reading copy. So it's not like I don't read the stories they contain.


message 14: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Y'all will probably hate me for this, but I don't treat any of my books with so much care. I buy them to read them, and so other people can read them, so I never buy any rare or signed copies, though I've had a few signed myself when I've met the author. My books' value to me is when they're used, so I try to lend them out as much as possible, whenever I can find someone who might want to read them, and if they never come back it doesn't bother me. My very favorite books I'm always giving away so I have to keep buying new copies.

I can understand the urge to collect cool things, I just haven't caught that way of feeling about books, I guess. I totally love buying a book someone else has read and annotated, though. Underlines, notes, tabs, all make a book cooler to me. So I freely do that in my own books. If Fermat hadn't done it, we'd never know about his last theorem, right? If the author knows words I don't know, then if there's a pen handy when I'm reading I'll underline the word and make a mark on the edge of the papers so I can find it again and look it up later. I've learned lots of great words that way, like horripilated, uxorious, and valetudinarian. The books themselves, the paper things, aren't what's precious to me, it's the ideas, thoughts, concepts, stories, whatever, things which luckily can't be damaged or destroyed.

When someone asked C.S. Lewis once if he thought we'd have libraries in heaven, he said yes, that they'd likely consist of all the books we'd lent or given away during our lives. I thought that was a cool idea, so I took it to heart and I've tried to build myself a nice one. ;)


message 15: by Phoenixfalls (new)

Phoenixfalls | 17 comments Tatiana -- I think I'm just paranoid that my favorite authors are going to end up out-of-print and I won't be ABLE to replace them. I plan on living lots more decades, and reading the stories to my kids and their kids (and heck, maybe even their kids) and the thought that my most beloved books wouldn't survive to that point puts me in a cold sweat. It's why I tend to buy hardcovers too. . .

Clearly I just need to bite the bullet and go digital. ;)

I mean, I'm cool with underlines and notes in the margins, I can see how it makes the book a more. . . communal thing. . . but usually books that have that sort of wear and tear are also well on their way to coming apart at the seams, and just. . . HORRORS!!!

(This is probably because I destroyed a lot of my parents' old SF/F collection when I was a pre-teen and reading them by the pool, or in the bath, etc., and I've discovered as an adult that some of that stuff is already really hard to find again!)


message 16: by Tatiana (new)

Tatiana | 144 comments Mod
Very true! I sold a bunch of my SF paperbacks to a bookstore once when I had to move into a smaller place, and most of them are out of print now and can't be replaced. I guess I'm trusting to the digital commons to have all the books ever written available for me to read to my grandkids. I like paperbacks because they're more comfortable to hold and easier to read in bed and stuff. I do have tons of hardbacks too, but I find they're usually more awkward for me to handle. But the paperbacks go looseleaf when I've read them enough times. I guess the LotR paperbacks and Godel, Escher, Bach are the ones I can think of that are looseleaf now. I finally broke down and bought hardback copies of those.

I can't wait until we can just get the whole Library of Congress on a thumb drive or SD card or something. Really, why shouldn't every book ever published be instantly available to us?


message 17: by Mir (new)

Mir | 31 comments @Sho: !


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

Miriam wrote: "@Sho: !"
See, I left out the brackets so the rest of the code would show, but the next line down, where there's my text but no photo, I used the code above it with the brackets on either end.


message 19: by Mir (new)

Mir | 31 comments Did you take out that last backslash?


message 20: by Cass (new)

Cass I have a picture that I cut out of a magazine about 10years ago. 5 house moves later and it is still blu-tacked on my desk right where I can drool over it.


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