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Grammar Central > Colloquialisms

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message 1: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
NE used a phrase that had me stumped....'jump the shark'. All sorted now, but it made me think of a few obscure and funny colloquialisms I know.......you start!!!


message 2: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
O alright then....I will start.
In Australia you say "She'll be magnolia love" to indicate that everything will turn out ok.


message 3: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
I think "jump the shark" has gone outdated for some NEW way to say something's as good as dead, only I forgot what the new saying is. Man, it's tough to be cool when you're about as out of touch with popular culture as I am.


message 4: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Oh, yeah. I think you've got it! (BTW, Bunny, you're not "hip," are you? I thought you had to be under 25 to be truly cool.)

Now to think of some things that have "nuked the fridge"...


message 5: by Old-Barbarossa (new)

Old-Barbarossa Heard "jump the shark" was from an episode of Happy Days.
Where does "nuke the fridge" come from, it's new to me.


message 6: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
She'll be magnolia, love. As in...everything will be fine, dear!
Another one from the other side of the ditch (Aussie) was "fair suck of the sav mate", meaning either 'give me a break!' or 'it's all true without a word of a lie' depending on circumstances and levels of alcohol consumed!!! (Sav is short for saveloy which is a red-skinned sausage....like a cocktail frank but bigger)


message 7: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Yeah, that scene (in fact, movie) was ridiculous. Cured me of any sentimentality I held for Indy for good. Sorry, Harry-San...


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

From my days in Jersey ... "goin' down the shore" for going to the beach.


message 9: by Leann (new)

Leann (leann0330) | 1 comments Here in the South, we say "I'm fixing to go to the store" meaning that I'm preparing to or getting ready to go to the store. Basically, "I'll be going to the store in a little while."

And I don't know if this is a colloquialism, but I get made fun of a lot by my husband for saying, "That canoe just 'tumped' over" (i.e., "That canoe just turned over").


message 10: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15876 comments Mod
Aha. Preparing to get ready to begin to start.

My specialty.


message 11: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
8th-grade students have patented it.


message 12: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Yes....so have Year 6 kids.....take 5 minutes to find pencil....take 2 more to find sharpener.....then 6 minutes to sharpen said pencil, being careful to break lead at least 3 times.....and so on!!


message 13: by Boreal Elizabeth (new)

Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments but what i want to know leann is
if ya et yet?
don't need to answer right away
i'll get up wit ya later
maybe tuesday next


message 14: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Jeet?

No, joo?


message 15: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Yes David, I did...tasty scallops. You didn't tell me you spoke Nyu Zild (as she is spoke)!!!


message 16: by Gail (new)

Gail David:
No. Juwanna go an get sumthin?


message 17: by Old-Barbarossa (last edited Oct 29, 2008 04:32AM) (new)

Old-Barbarossa "gonnae goan gerrih" is Glaswegian for the same.
Also "wotshout erra polis" is Glaswegian for "beware, here come the law enforcement officers"


message 18: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Juwanna? I think I dated her in the 70s.

As for "gonnae goan gerrih," I'm more than sure that was featured in one of those graphic health films we viewed in high school.



message 19: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Wicked. It's quintessential New England and wicked cool.


message 20: by Boreal Elizabeth (new)

Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments yes but it was originally
merely
wicked good


message 21: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
In Australia they add 'but' to the ends of sentences....."Have you seen the remote but?"

"Yeah, it rained all night but"


Any theories on that one?!


message 22: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
My but dangles a lot....unless I wear Nancy Ganz!!


message 23: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
How do you wear Nancy Ganz, and why does she stand for it? I'm assuming she's a lightweight!


message 24: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments I think you are reasoning a posteriori, but I'm just guessing.


message 25: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Teehee! Nancy Ganz is a brand of foundation garments that middle-aged women are wont to wear!! I won't wear one...I am a rebel....hence the dangling 'but'!


message 26: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments So you don't have Ganz in your pants?

"With rosy red garters and pink hose on my feet
Turkey-red bloomer with a rumble seat"

--"Richland Woman Blues" by Mississippi John Hurt


message 27: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Don't know names of pants. Mine have no name. And when they die they will go into an unmarked grave called "Pants." Wait a minute. That would be a mark. OK. My pants' name would be Mark. Gospel truth.


message 28: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
"I've been through the desert in the pants with no name......"

NE......don't call them Mark!! PLEASE?!!!! BAD connotations!

And David...I love those lyrics :-)


message 29: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments "Red rooster says,
'Cock-a-doodle-de-doo,'
Richland woman says,
'Any dude will do.'

"Hurry down, sweet Daddy
Come blowin' your horn.
If you come too late,
Sweet Mama will be gone."


message 30: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Hahahahaha!! She is willing to 'settle'. Foolish woman!


message 31: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Re: Mark. Does (your) ex mark the spot?

Correction: my pants have no "proper" (as in noun) name. Still, I allow them a proper burial.


message 32: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Re: Mark....have you never heard of skidmarks?


message 33: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Ohhhhhhh. Skidmarks. Have we sunk THAT low? Being a family group, we won't get into the (ahem) proper names of our underwear, will we. But I do wonder what the initials "BVD" stand for...


message 34: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15876 comments Mod
Bradley, Voorhees & Day


message 35: by Savvy (new)

Savvy  (savvysuzdolcefarniente) | 1456 comments BVD

I always thought they stood for...

Barrister's Vampire Deflector :-)


message 36: by Ken (last edited Nov 18, 2008 05:07PM) (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
I thought (like the "S" in "Harry S Truman") it stood for absolutely nothing. Wrong. Again.


message 37: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
OMG!!! Mint is one that is used here too! For a while! Maybe it is a British thing (aren't Bostonians more British than the British?!)


message 38: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 15876 comments Mod
My family, in So Cal, used the term "lace curtain Irish" to refer to something that was way too gentile for its own good.


message 39: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
....and my family referred to 'bog Irish' to refer to those who lived in squalor.


message 40: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Irish lace = cobwebs

Irish twins = siblings born inside a year of each other.

Oh, those language-enriching Irish!


message 41: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments In my experience, the opposite of "lace curtain Irish" was "shanty Irish."


message 42: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
There's Black Irish...


message 43: by Savvy (new)

Savvy  (savvysuzdolcefarniente) | 1456 comments and there's Irish Cream!


message 44: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Ohhhh yessss baby!!


message 45: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments An "Irish haircut" is knuckles rubbed sharply across the scalp.

But why single out the Harps? Let's be ecumenical.

Consider:

Dutch treat
talk to someone like a Dutch uncle
French leave
To gyp someone
To jew someone down
To welsh on a bet
Chinese handball (a New York thing, I think)
Indian giver

"In Spain the best upper sets do it
Lithuanians and Letts to it,
Let's do it
Lets fall in love."




message 46: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Letts? From Lettland?


message 47: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Latvians. An old-fashioned term, used to make the internal rhyme, I imagine.


message 48: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18409 comments Mod
Oh. Thanks a Lat.


message 49: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Mr. NE:

"Cold Cape Cod claims, 'gainst their wish, do it.
Even lazy jellyfish do it . . . "


message 50: by Savvy (new)

Savvy  (savvysuzdolcefarniente) | 1456 comments oooh...luv Cole Porter!

"Some Argentines, without means do it
People say in Boston even beans do it..."

(those east coasters...pshaw!) :-)




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