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OGSG Archives > March is Women's History Month!

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message 1: by Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (last edited Mar 01, 2011 05:19PM) (new)

Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Here are 2 great links:
http://womenshistorymonth.gov/
http://www.nwhp.org/

As well as link from Penguin Group:
http://us.penguingroup.com/static/htm...

Some interesting UK gardening links:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/...

http://www.gardeningwomen.com/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/books...

(Wonder why when searching it seems the awareness of women in gardening is more paid attention to in the UK than any where else?)

Who are your favorite women gardeners and writers?


Petra on hiatus in hospital & not the beach,Cancun (petra-x) I think that gardening in general has more attention paid to it. Gardening programmes on tv (fronted by male or female gardeners) do very well and occasionally get to cult status.


message 3: by Terri (new)

Terri | 480 comments We don't really have any good garden shows on here that I'm aware of. Which is really sad. You would think during a recession this kind of show would be big.

On HGTV here all they show are Home Hunters, First Time Buyers and How to Sell shows. That's great if you're moving, but what about if you're staying?

I have been told that we are WAY behind the UK when it comes to backyard gardens and gardening organically. They also have better laws in place to protect them from companies like Monsanto. I can't figure out why that is.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) HGTV used to have great gardening shows as did our PBS (public) stations; unfortunately no more! I miss them! I will say that Victory Garden is back on here but I can't remember what station right now.


Petra on hiatus in hospital & not the beach,Cancun (petra-x) Do you know about allotments? I think they are peculiar to the UK and might account for the popularity of gardening as it doesn't matter where you live, high-rise or farm, rich or poor, you can have a plot to garden on. You just apply to the Council and you get a plot for very little rent. People commonly put up a little shed (necessary, it rains a lot in the UK) and then they always have a good excuse to go out and tend the allotment. Most people grow veg with some flowers, some all of one, or all of the other, some just use it to get out of the house and have some company. Allotments are quite small and all abut each other. I Googled some pics: http://www.google.com/images?q=allotm...


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) I have heard about them! Here in the US it's often a huge pain in the arse to try and get community gardens (as we call them) going which is just ridiculous to me but it's unfortunately true.


message 7: by Terri (new)

Terri | 480 comments Wow! That's so cool! I wish we had that here. We have about 40 4 x 20 plots that are available to the community through lottery picks--but that's for 250,000 people. Personally, I think they ought to limit it to low-income families and renters who have no other place to garden. People who have their own backyards should not be allowed to take up those precious few. I was offered a plot but declined because it's way across town and would have involved a fifteen minute drive every day. To me, that kind of defeats the whole "green" idea behind it. I'm waiting until they open one on my side of town.


message 8: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Terri, in England most villages traditionally owned common land, which was used for the people to graze their own sheep. Now it is being used for the allotments, since fewer people want to graze sheep. The British have all sorts of traditions that make a lot of sense! My oldest sister lived in Cambridge for five years, so I had the chance to learn a lot.

I cancelled cable TV after my cousin died, since he was the TV addict. But while I had it, I watched quite a few gardening shows on HGTV, as well as remodeling shows. Have they stopped showing those? I loved the gardening guy from Oklahoma. It was on early Saturday or Sunday morning if I recall. I always took copious notes. They also had one that showed tours of gardens, that gave me good ideas to use.


message 9: by Terri (new)

Terri | 480 comments No more gardening shows on HGTV here in the L.A. basin. And I haven't seen much in the way of remodeling. (I can only think of one and it ain't that great). As far as decorating, I've only found Candace Olsen's show--she does some really beautiful rooms but gosh, I think they end up costing about $100,000 per room. Ok, maybe that's a slight exaggeration, but it's always way above my means.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) No gardening as a whole on on HGTV anymore. Very sad.


message 11: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Well, it sounds like they need to change their name to NHTV, New Home TV, not HGTV!

Candace's rooms were gorgeous, but not what anyone could afford, and not even very many ideas one could adapt.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) When it comes to women I admire in general, I'd have to say Louisa May Alcott, Maya Angelou and Loretta Lynn are the first who come to mind along with my Mom, my Nan and 2 of my best friends, B & G.


message 13: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Jo wrote: "HGTV used to have great gardening shows as did our PBS (public) stations; unfortunately no more! I miss them! I will say that Victory Garden is back on here but I can't remember what station right ..."

I too miss the gardening shows on Public TV. Gardening is very big in my area, but maybe this isn't so across the country thus not enough interest to keep these shows on.


message 14: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Petra X wrote: "Do you know about allotments? I think they are peculiar to the UK and might account for the popularity of gardening as it doesn't matter where you live, high-rise or farm, rich or poor, you can ha..."

I've heard of them, but never seen one.


message 15: by Beth (new)

Beth Mathison | 34 comments My favorite woman gardener was my grandmother. She had a beautiful garden -- one giant plot of perrenials, one large plot of veggies. She also had flowers all around her house. She passed on her love of gardening to me.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) That is so sweet! Thank you for sharing that with us Beth! I wish I could say the same but gardening doesn't run in our family; my cousin and I started gardening though around the same time without knowing the other was doing it!!!


message 17: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Beth wrote: "My favorite woman gardener was my grandmother. She had a beautiful garden -- one giant plot of perrenials, one large plot of veggies. She also had flowers all around her house. She passed on her..."

My mom and grandma raised a huge veg garden with considerable help from my dad and a plentiful supply of cow manure on our farm. As I kid I wasn't very interested in the hoeing, but I did enjoy planting and eating! When I started gardening on my own property in my 20s I couldn't believe how much I had learned while sweating and complaining in my younger years. Even today I will sometimes hear my mom's voice when I'm working in the garden reminding me about one thing or another.


message 18: by Terri (new)

Terri | 480 comments Cheryl: How nice that you had that foundation. I have had to learn pretty much on my own. My mother and mother-in-law never gardened. My husbands grandmother used to grow and can everything but by the time I was interested in it, she had already passed away. :( Thank God for gardening books!


message 19: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Like Cheryl, I am a self-taught. My father's experience in gardening was to, immediately on his first posting as a minister, tear out the "weeds" in the rectory's yard. Turns out it was a lovely cottage style garden from the previous rector, who had passed away. He never did quite live that down.
My grandfather thought he was a gardener, but he only grew a few annuals in a very formal small bed.
None of the women in the family gardened except my aunt Mig, and I did not know that until long after I had taught myself a lot.


Petra on hiatus in hospital & not the beach,Cancun (petra-x) My grandparents had a huge garden, it stretched between two roads. The back garden was three-quarters lawn, herbaceous borders, pool etc. Right at the top was the veg. garden and the barn. It was mostly left to the gardener, we only went up there to pick raspberries or asparagus or something. The front garden was flowers, mostly roses which were my grandfather's passion. It was featured on some mag. cover, I forget which, Ideal Home or something like that. So I learned a lot about roses, names, pruning, which ones to grow where etc. I can't grow roses here which was a shame. I would also love a mixed herbaceous border but again, can't do that here.

(Eventually my grandparents decided to downsize the house, so they sold their old one together with all the gardens except the veg. patch. They knocked down the barn and built a house there. For years afterwards, despite the landscaping, odd veg and fruit would be found growing amongst the flowers.)


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) I'm self taught as well but I haven't minded at all! It's been such a great adventure learning and experiencing the trials & errors; I've loved every minute of it!


Petra on hiatus in hospital & not the beach,Cancun (petra-x) What is your favourite thing to grow? Flowers or veg?


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Flowers are my favorite to grow above all followed (mostly perennials, some annuals) by tomato's & some herbs. When we finally have a place that we own one day, I'll expand on the veggies & what not if I'm able given my health & physical limitations.


message 24: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Definitely flowers now, for me. I live alone, and it seems like a waste to plant much of a veggie garden. I did love my huge veggie and fruit garden in Idaho. I did all the canning, freezing, freezer jams, etc. We didn't do tree fruit, since there were orchards nearby where we could get fruit very inexpensively (no shipping/ preservation costs if during the season). I am trying to gravitate more towards shrubs, since my knees are shot. Less labor involved. So I am slowly moving in that direction. Slowly because I tend to start shrubs from starts or by tiny ones!


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Here are some women connected with gardenings history worth looking into:

Gertrude Jekyll who was a British garden designer and writer as well as part of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England in the last 1800's.

Vita Sackville-West, English author and poet who's gardens at Sissinghurst Castle are still in existence today (who also had an affair with author Virginia Wolf in the late 1920's).

Elizabeth von Arnim, Australian born British author of Elizabeth and Her German Garden.

Lester Rowntree (aka Gertrude Ellen Lester aka Gertrude Lester Rowntree) [English born] American botanist, horticulturist, and writer.


message 26: by NancyL (new)

NancyL Luckey And Helen Dillon - who is amusing in her writings. As well as Penelope Hobhouse.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Thank you for adding those Nancy!


message 28: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Louise Beebe Wilder- I have some of her journaling like "What Happens in My Garden".

Celia Thaxter, "An Island Garden"

Sydney Eddison, winner of National Garden Clubs' Award of Excellence. (By the way, the Landscape Design classes put on by the NGC are excellent!)


message 29: by Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (last edited Mar 17, 2011 02:54PM) (new)

Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Today, the grand marshal's of the 2 biggest St. Patrick's Day Parades in the world (NYC and Dublin) were both women! Author Mary Higgins Clark is the grand marshal of the NYC parade and champion boxer Katie Taylor is the grand marshal of the Dublin parade.

Mary Higgins Clark: http://www.ny1.com/content/top_storie...

http://www.maryhigginsclark.com/mary_...

Katie Taylor: http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/i...

http://www.wban.org/biog/ktaylor.htm


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