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Previous BotM--DISCUSSIONS > 2011-03 THE NAME OF THE WIND: finished reading (SPOILERS)

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message 1: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
Here's a general topic for people who are finished with The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss.

Beware - may contain spoilers up to and including the end of this novel!


message 2: by Jon (last edited Mar 01, 2011 09:58AM) (new)

Jon (jonmoss) | 626 comments I read this in September 2008 (my review) almost in one sitting. I turned the paperback edition back into the library and immediately bought a first edition hardcover via an online reseller for my permanent collection, which I'm taking with me to St. Louis in two weeks to have signed by the author as well as the sequel.


message 3: by Phoenixfalls (new)

Phoenixfalls | 187 comments I read this back in June 2009 (my review) and was pleased but not overwhelmingly so. Happy I own the book, but perfectly fine with my mass market copy and I will be waiting for a mass market of The Wise Man's Fear so they match and so I can save money.


message 4: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikespencer) | 48 comments I actually just finished last night and I really enjoyed it. For some reason, I was expecting this bleak, dark epic, which it wasn't at all, but I'm not at all disappointed with what I got instead.

Kvothe reminded me a lot of Ender from Ender's Game, which is one of my favorite novels. I really liked how he was intelligent and multilayered and not one dimensional like many protagonists.

All in all, it was a very quick read and I immediately ordered The Wise Man's Fear upon finishing.


message 5: by Kevin (last edited Mar 01, 2011 05:05PM) (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 372 comments Mike wrote: "I actually just finished last night and I really enjoyed it. For some reason, I was expecting this bleak, dark epic, which it wasn't at all, but I'm not at all disappointed with what I got instead...."

He is not at all like Ender, Ender knows what he did was wrong, but not Kvothe, as the series is titled he kills a King, not feeling remorse, I feel like he has not emotions at all. Plus no one remembers him like Ender.


message 6: by Shel, Moderator (new)

Shel (shel99) | 2121 comments Mod
Read this a while ago, and loved it. I too will be waiting for the mass market pb of Wise Men's Fear, but that's because I just don't buy hardcovers.


message 7: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments I read this when it came out. Found the opening the most intriguing part, and am very hopeful the ending of the series will live up to the mystique created in those first two chapters.

I am no fan of cliffhanger endings. Hoping the second book ends at a better stopping point, since it seems we were just about to find out something significant.

I don't trust Deanna, and am waiting to find out just what sort of being she really is. Everything about her had sort of creepy undertones: her double barrel mystique, her absences, her vagueness, her name changes, and more, but I don't want to post outright spoilers this early in the discussion.


message 8: by Libby (new)

Libby | 19 comments Janny wrote: "I read this when it came out. Found the opening the most intriguing part, and am very hopeful the ending of the series will live up to the mystique created in those first two chapters."

My thoughts exactly - the beginning was very promising and then the book kind of fizzled for me. It was okay - I'm hoping to see more development of what I consider the more intriguing plot (Chadrian etc) in the 2nd book

My review http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/62...


message 9: by Laurel (new)

Laurel I've read it and enjoyed it quite a bit! I am also supremely jealous of Adrienne for getting the chance to hear Patrick Rothfuss do a reading ;)

I have a feeling that this book will lead to one of the best discussions we've ever had...


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) I agree with the "it's a disappointing ending" assessment, and in more ways than just the way he tied it up. He dropped a lot of hints about the characters but so far there are more holes than things we actually "know".

I (early on) read a lot of rave reviews of this book, but I didn't find it all that incredible.

My review:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 11: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 805 comments Laurel wrote: "I've read it and enjoyed it quite a bit! I am also supremely jealous of Adrienne for getting the chance to hear Patrick Rothfuss do a reading ;)

I have a feeling that this book will lead to one o..."


I had hoped to go to the signing last night, but as usual life gets in the way yet again.

I need a vacation *sigh*


message 12: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikespencer) | 48 comments Janny wrote: I don't trust Deanna, and am waiting to find out just what sort of being she really is. Everything about her had sort of creepy undertones: her double barrel mystique, her absences, her vagueness, her name changes, and more, but I don't want to post outright spoilers this early in the discussion.

I'm not sure about Denna. I can't tell if she is meant to be that mysterious girl that all guys seem to hold a place in their hearts for or if Rothfuss is trying to set us up for a big revelation that she's a demon or something. I'm actually leaning towards the former since Kvothe knows how the story ends and didn't hint at any betrayal as far as I remember.

Also, my copy of Wise Man's Fear was waiting on my desk when I got back from lunch today. So excited.


Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides (upsight) | 187 comments Denna definitely had an untrustworthy vibe.

Mike, I thought it was pretty dark. A lot of that was from hints and foreshadowing, though.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) I got pretty sick of the romance story after a while. I said before, it was starting to put me in mind of Great Expectations.


message 15: by Kara (last edited Mar 02, 2011 08:03PM) (new)

Kara (sterlink) | 73 comments Snail in Danger (Nikki) wrote: "Denna definitely had an untrustworthy vibe."

Hmmm... she's definitely secretive. I hear what you're saying, but has she waylaid any trust? (It's been a few years... my review I don't recall, but could have forgotten).

I'm curious to see where the story goes concerning Denna. Clearly there is more to her than meets the eye.


message 16: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
What I'm most curious about with Denna is who her secret patron is. They call him "Mister Ash" jokingly, and I can't help but think he has something to do with the Chandrian (e.g. Cinder). By herself, I think she's just a girl trying to make her way in the world, nothing really sinister.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

I just don't see Cinder as being the type of guy who wouldn't come off as "runaway!runaway!" creepy even to a girl like Denna.

Maybe one of the others, or even Haliax himself...


message 18: by Kara (last edited Mar 02, 2011 11:17PM) (new)

Kara (sterlink) | 73 comments Stefan wrote: "They call him "Mister Ash" jokingly, and I can't help but think he has something to do with the Chandrian (e.g. Cinder). By herself, I think she's just a girl trying to make her way in the world, nothing really sinister. ..."

With ya there Stefan. On both accounts, that is the impression I got (though I'm not sure it's Cinder).

Ala wrote: "I just don't see Cinder as being the type of guy who wouldn't come off as "runaway!runaway!" creepy even to a girl like Denna."

Or possibly there even exists a less sinister side to the Chandrian... one of which Denna is privy too?


Okay. So, what did people think of Rothfuss's roaming dragon? I personally loved the cracked out dragon, and the use of denner in the book. I specifically remember liking that the fire breathing of the draccus made scientific sense.

I also liked Rothfuss's use of denner and creation of "sweet eaters," with their extra white teeth... definitely does a good job of emulating and encompassing multiple drug addicts.


message 19: by Jacen (new)

Jacen | 11 comments Reading through the comments about Denna something came to mind, crackpot theory but something to throw out there maybe she doesnt just "know" about the chandrian but perhaps she hunts down those with information about them.
The idea came to mind at the mention of her being privy to something about them. She travels alot, was present at an attack by the chandrian themselves. The scrivs who hunt down books gave me the idea aswell.


message 20: by Kara (last edited Mar 03, 2011 12:00AM) (new)

Kara (sterlink) | 73 comments Jacen wrote: "crackpot theory but something to throw out there maybe she doesnt just "know" about the chandrian but perhaps she hunts down those with information about them..."

Could be... interesting thoughts. =)

I'm wondering what Rothfuss would think of our Denna discussions. lol


message 21: by Jan (new)

Jan (janoda) I read this in january 2010, and really, really loved it. I have a thing for main characters who aren't necessarily good guys, and I thought Kvothe was a truly flawed character, which isn't a frequent occurrence in fantasy in my experience.

However, because I loved it so much I reread it quite fast, and on the reread I found that the love story didn't come of as strong as the rest of the narrative, and actually got a little in the way of the more interesting parts of the story.

I really loved the famous intro where all the myths surrounding him are briefly mentioned, but I think that adds to the slight disappointment with the book, because only the less interesting myths are addressed.

I'm still looking forward to The Wise Man's Fear immensely, but I'm slightly apprehensive as well, because I fear it's at risk of falling in the middle book trap.


message 22: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikespencer) | 48 comments Interesting comments about Denna and the Chandrian. I also very quickly started wondering if the mysterious Mr. Ash could be one of the Chandrian. I don't know what that would mean about Denna, but I like Jacen's theory:

Jacen wrote: ...maybe she doesnt just "know" about the chandrian but perhaps she hunts down those with information about them...


message 23: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 372 comments Jan wrote: "I read this in january 2010, and really, really loved it. I have a thing for main characters who aren't necessarily good guys, and I thought Kvothe was a truly flawed character, which isn't a frequ..."

I also like a character who is not the good guys, but there has to be a reason for why the character is evil, basically a justification for their actions.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) Humm, a justification for evil.... interesting concept. :)


Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides (upsight) | 187 comments Actually, Kevin has a point. In a lot of fantasy books it seems like there are villains who commit atrocities but there's no real reason beyond "Character is bat!@#$ crazy or so accustomed to being brutal that they don't even notice that they've crossed the moral event horizon." This is kind of a turn-off for me. The character being really power-hungry can work, but it is also somewhat overdone and can be boring to read about.

I don't know if I made much sense there. If not, oh well, I tried. ;)


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) Actually (fiction or reality) no villain actually thinks he's a villain...well in all but a few. There are some who actually "want" to be "evil" I suppose. But on the whole I'm sure Adolf Hitler thought of himself as the hero of his own story. What changes is the perception of evil I suppose. "If it's me, it's not evil" so to speak.

That's one of the major proofs of "objective evil" by the way.

So, my joke aside, I realize you're saying you like the protagonist to "have" or "perceive" a justification for his actions.


message 27: by Jacen (new)

Jacen | 11 comments In light of the Denna and Chandrian her patrons name is Mr Ash and we know that one of the Chandrian is named Cinder... another crackpot connection


message 28: by Andria (new)

Andria I read this book in 2008 and finished it less then a week. I found it a nice change from other fantasies. I have to give Rothfuss props for being original in his storytelling.

I hate to make any solid judgements until I read the other books because as it stands now you don't know much about the whole story line. Just bits and pieces. Well it is the first day and Kvothe said it would take 3 days to get the whole story. I am more than willing to wait for the other two.


message 29: by Jea0126 (new)

Jea0126 | 4 comments I bought the pb edition when it first came out and breezed through it. I thought it was a lot of fun. I've ordered Wise Man's Fear and am eagerly waiting its arrival. I'm just concerned that I'll fly through it too and then have another several years to wait until the next one is published. bummer.


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

It's over a 1000 pages, but yeah, you'll probably breeze through it like I did.

The wait is going to kill me...


message 31: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Xu (kxu65) | 372 comments I think for me in fantasy, if a main character like Kvothe is a prodigy, they do not need to make so many bone headed mistakes, the two just don't mix.


colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) I agree, Kevin. I don't think it's true just in fantasy, though, and I'm not entirely sure I agree with it in relation to Kvothe because I already said I thought he was a Gary Stu and I'm sticking with that - but, in a general sense, it does annoy me greatly when we are constantly told about a certain trait a character has that we never get to see.

A different example would be 'The Meaning of Night'. The protagonist was supposed to be this brilliant guy, but he didn't figure out the ending that I'd guessed less than half-way through the book, and he kept missing really blatant and obvious clues.

I also felt the same way about Locke in that series.


message 33: by Jan (new)

Jan (janoda) I disagree. I felt that Kvothe's stupid mistakes boil down to his own arrogance. He considers himself a prodigy, and the myths - which he helped create - back him up, but other people don't always back him up.

I thought it was great that for once a fantasy main character actually had to pay for his mistakes and arrogance; I didn't find him Gary Stu at all.


message 34: by Morgan (last edited Mar 18, 2011 06:51AM) (new)

Morgan (tribal) | 9 comments I am with Jan here. I did not find Kvothe / Kote to be a Gary Stu (nor a "Larry Stu", "Marty Stu", or "Bobby Stu") at all.

Along with what Jan said above, you have to keep in mind the Kvothe/Kote is the one who is actually telling this story. Obviously he is going to make himself as idealized as possible, it is his flaw... the flaw , if you will. The arrogant, prideful, egotistical, all about me flaw. So Kvothe, in the frame story may be somewhat Gary Stu like, but Kvothe in the novel is far from it. It is like a shiny penny you find on the ground. Clean and shiny on one side, muddy and rancid on the other. Neither overly thrilling, but when put together it brings out the character within.

Kvothe is pretty clean for the most part. The brilliant minded prodigy whose only major failings are his lack of common sense at times (which is normal for intelligent people anyway), and obvious adolescence (poor money handling, dealing with the opposite sex). But take that into context with Kote who obviously has some demons to deal with (internal and external) and you have to wonder (or at least I do), how he came to be so different from what he was like in his story.

It is not Rothfuss who is favoring Kvothe, bragging about him, or favoring him to some high degree (which is what would paint the Gary Stu emblem on his chest); it is Kote / Kvothe himself who is doing it. That is what makes it interesting for me anyway.


colleen the convivial curmudgeon (blackrose13) Morgan - that would work for me more if Kote, telling the story, didn't preface it about how the heroic tales weren't true, and didn't have the air that he was going to tell the harsh, gritty truth of it.


message 36: by Jan (new)

Jan (janoda) Colleen ~blackrose~ wrote: "Morgan - that would work for me more if Kote, telling the story, didn't preface it about how the heroic tales weren't true, and didn't have the air that he was going to tell the harsh, gritty truth..."

Deconstructing myths doesn't make you a reliable narrator. I think we can trust Kote's narration when it comes to the actions and events, and even to a certain point about the characterization of his friends. I don't think one can ever paint a true picture about oneself though.

And for a smart person it's extra difficult to see that sometimes they did something stupid, and it's easy to think something was brilliant.


message 37: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments The opening scenes, the 'now' in this tale, and the older Kvothe are what interested me the most; and my investment on this story hinges (I'm quite willing to wait) upon how that part of the story resolves. The promise set forth was very intriguing and huge. If the series ends, and escalates that - it all rests in the delivery.

So far, (at the close of this volume) quite a lot is left open ended.


message 38: by Morgan (new)

Morgan (tribal) | 9 comments Colleen ~blackrose~ wrote: "Morgan - that would work for me more if Kote, telling the story, didn't preface it about how the heroic tales weren't true, and didn't have the air that he was going to tell the harsh, gritty truth..."

True, and a good point, but those heroic tales that he is referring to are the ones that are told around tables at an inn, like Old Cob's story at the end. They are heroic to the point of absurdity. His tale does not lend itself to those same heights that the legends do. His tale is more gritty (family killed, homeless, orphan, poor, whipped, beaten, burned...). All of those things happened to him, and he pulled through them with determination, not high flying magic, summoning demons, and calling upon the name of the ______, like the legends we assume say about him. So on that front, he is telling the harsh and gritting truth. But just how much of it? Just as he says he is going to offer the truth of the story, he also says that the best lies about him "are the ones I told" and that "I am a myth".

And what of his old arrogant self is left? Those we don't have answers for. I don't find him to be a reliable narrator at this point, but he is a storyteller.


message 39: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments The presentday character is depicted as dead inside, without hope - deep in hiding from his past, and the early opening events appear that SOMETHING ugly may be catching up with him/forcing him from his complacency.

If he was once young, arrogant, seeded such myths - etc - I want to know HOW he got where he is, what killed his inner exuberance, know what he is waiting for in such stillness. I read books to see how characters meet adversities and change. How they rise to meet events, or fall, and rise again.

On those counts: still waiting.

He could be an unreliable narrator or a very honest one, admitting to his mistakes and arrogance. He lost his family - that caused him to inflate himself/fueled his youthful determination. The telling event (if I am reading this story as it will go?) is yet to occur.

When his family died, he was spared by luck/and he was the VICTIM.

The character who learns the Name of the Wind is not that victim, but becoming a person of power...the forces moving him toward a confrontation with the Chandria, (and he is running headlong toward that, given the last scene) and given his evident flaws and blind spots/lack of common sense and arrogance - when those things come home to roost at the crux, THAT is where the pivotal moment may reside/and also what will potentially interest me as a reader.

The story that really interests me, actually, is what happens after the back story is told.


message 40: by Morgan (new)

Morgan (tribal) | 9 comments Well said, Janny! I really like how Rothfuss handled the prologue and epilogue as being one and the same, yet slightly different. And both show that up to this point, even with day one of his story told and his confrontation with the possessed mercenary at the end, that neither did little to ignite Kvothe. The biggest difference, if it can be considered that, is that in the prologue he is described as having "subtle certainty" and in the end it changes to "weary calm". Makes my think of the "certainty" of oncoming weather and the "calm" before the storm...


message 41: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments I finished it late last night and read your posts with interest. I have mixed feelings about the book. I'm not rushing to buy the next one - have too much other stuff I want to read more.

Good points: It's very readable, mostly kept my interest. I loved the writing in the beginning of the book, and was somewhat let down as it continued.

Dubious points: I was a little put off by the story within a story within a story. It felt too contrived. I read an AWFUL book last year that had 'fairy tales' sprinkled throughout. I'm suspicious of artificial fairy tales and myths, when I know the author wrote them and they're not genuine folklore or myth.

There were times when I was bored and skimmed.

Kvothe did not feel like a 15 year old boy to me. I realize that it is Kote telling the story from an adult POV, but still.... I found the part about his devastating loss and continuing abuse to be hard to read. And also to make his subsequent actions (finding his way to university, getting admitted, etc.) a little hard to swallow. Few people could live through that as unscathed as Kvothe seems to be.

I think Denna is definitely part of the whole Chandrian thing, and I'm hopeful that there is another side to them as I'm bored with totally evil villains. Interesting that both the 'dragon' and the Chandrian have 'blue fire'. Hadn't thought of the Ash and Cinder connection, but the patron is certainly a shadowy character.

I was a bit jarred when 'Kote' became 'Kvothe' in the interlude scenes without explanation. And totally mystified by Bast's ambivalent relationship to iron. First he's terrified of it, then he grabs the amulet from Chronicler's neck? Huh? During the whole fight with the mercenary, we got nothing from Kote/Kvothe. I kept wondering what he was doing - standing behind the bar in a trance? And his subsequent inability to perform magic just didn't work for me.

All in all it was enjoyable but didn't grab me so that I have to know the end of the story. Gave it four stars.


message 42: by Helen (new)

Helen I'm with Morgan and Janny on this debate. I also remember Bast not 'liking' Chronicler's iron when Chronicler named it. He also flinches every time the 'boy' came near with the iron bar. However, at the end where he was touching it he was obviously affected but was able to control it. It wasn't empowered by anyone was my understanding.

I agree that it is hard to think of him as 15 but he has lived through a lot and when travelling with his family it was pointed out that he was older than his years.

Being intelligent doesn't mean common sense - talk to those highly intelligent people about mundane things and you'll see. Also, he does start some of his myths at university and refers to them. For instance, not bleeding when being whipped.

His lack ofknowledge with women is due to age, his inability to handle money is age and experience - he's never had any. I also put down things like dashing off to the farm, having to buy the lute to his youth and the gaping whole of his lost family.

I liked the certainty and calm comment above. I think I'm going to have to read Wise Man's Fear next rather than my re-read of Stormed Fortress.


message 43: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 805 comments Sandra aka Sleo wrote: "I think Denna is definitely part of the whole Chandrian thing, and I'm hopeful that there is another side to them as I'm bored with totally evil villains. Interesting that both the 'dragon' and the Chandrian have 'blue fire'. Hadn't thought of the Ash and Cinder connection, but the patron is certainly a shadowy character."


I haven't the time to see if anyoe else has mentioned this, but when Kvothe's parents are talking with Ben about the song they are working on, Kvothe's father mentions that he believes he has figured out their motivation and purpose.

I don't think they are just your random Evil Guys who do harm for the sake of doing harm. We just don't know the entire story...yet.


message 44: by Helen (new)

Helen I'd forgotton that, we do need more info!


message 45: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 338 comments I just finished listening to the audio version. I had read the paperback a couple of years ago. While I was surprised at how well I remembered the events in the book (rarely happens), I picked up on a lot of subtlety I missed the first time. I agree that there's a lot to Denna that we don't know and I want to see how that plays out. She's kind of the female version of Kvothe. I think it's interesting that they were both spared by the Chandrian.

As I was listening the end yesterday, I began to wonder about Auri, the girl who lives under the university. I realized that she may not be human, but fae. She has many of the same mannerisms as Bast. I just started listening to The Wise Man's Fear, so I hope we get to find out.


message 46: by Helen (new)

Helen That is a good point Sandi. I'm really enjoying Wise Man's Fear, about half way.


message 47: by NC (new)

NC (cyberfrenzy) | 7 comments You know, there was a chapter where Patrick refers to how everything goes downhill because of a woman (the chapter where he mentions that there were far too few women in the "story" he was telling) - and the next chapter we were introduced to Devi - I thought she might be the one Patrick was referring to - but it could be that the woman was Denna - thoughts anyone? As I don't seem to recall the chapter to the word.

Of-course, I don't think Denna is evil - like the typical light/dark fantasy novels (nothing about this amazing piece of literature is typical) - It seems more like a possible betrayal, if at all, ie - or something that is related to how Kvothe mentions how the world is in a bad shape, and he was responsible for it (somewhere he mentions that I think, when talking to Chronicler). Or maybe it is nothing. Again, thoughts?

Also I'm curious if the Smith's apprentice - Aaron - gets a bigger role, as he seems a little interesting.

Anyways, I can't wait to read the second chapter of Kvothe's life. Might provide more answers to many questions in this topic.


message 48: by mark (new)

mark monday (happy-end-of-the-world) | 113 comments finished this a week or so ago. thought it was pretty great. i'll just copy parts of my review:

this is a really absorbing mixture of epic fantasy tropes and The Story of Kvothe: The Harry Potter Years. the three portions of kvothe's life that are detailed are nothing new; in fact a person could call out each scenario as an obvious cliche of the genre. happily, nothing felt derivative to me and kvothe's adventures were a pleasure to read from beginning to end. it is hard for me to put a finger on why this is so, other than to state the obvious: the writing is excellent. now this is not especially lyrical or literary writing - i never felt the need to put the book down and savor a brilliant or haunting phrase. but what it is, well, is perhaps even more enjoyable: a truly well-crafted page-turner that escapes derivativeness by virtue of its straightforward humanism, its carefully constructed mysteries, its expert pacing, its many scenes of derring-do, its equally frequent scenes of contemplation & moodiness, and its splendid hero - one who manages to be both somewhat of an everyman and yet also a singular & highly individualistic oddball. sometimes a classic formula works perfectly, and this novel manages to take three classic situations (theatre types on the road, orphan child-thief, student mage) and breathe new life into them.

for me, there was one striking flaw: the portrayal of kvothe in the framing sequences and within the interludes. personally, i need to be shown how a character is an amazing icon, a fearful wizard, a terrifying power who moved history. i can't just be told that - or even have it implied - and then just accept that this is how i should view the character. so, although the framing sequences and interludes were definitely compelling - i really want to know what is going to happen next - i found myself rushing through them to get back to the boyhood adventures. all that said, this is truly a minor flaw in my opinion.

so back to the novel's virtues:

Kindness. how refreshing to have so much kindness displayed by various characters throughout all of kvothe's life situations. the kindness was never maudlin or forced, and was depicted side-by-side with cruelty and other forms of darkness. but yet it was a pleasure to live in a world that was not all harsh edges, where some human beings didn't automatically want to fuck over other human beings.

Music. i loved this novel's focus on music as a key component of life, and how it was central to kvothe's self-image.

A Single Perspective. since george rr martin, i will always appreciate the multiple-perspective epic fantasy. but it was really enjoyable looking through kvothe's eyes throughout the novel. he never bored me, he never alienated me; his motivations were clear and yet he also managed to surprise me on a regular basis. in general, i don't need to like a protagonist for a novel to succeed for me. that said, kvothe is a prickly cuss at times but was also genuinely likeable - in a very unforced way.

Scary Demonic Beings. the Chandrian! gosh i am intrigued. i can't wait to read more about them. a woman with a broken sword? a man by a dead tree? a naked temptress? a white-haired man with all-black eyes? a man with a dog biting his leg? a thoughtful man, wrapped in shadow? who are these enigmatic villains who slaughter groups of people for digging up the wrong treasure or for singing the wrong song?

A Dragon. perhaps the most realistic dragon i've ever read about. sorta deadly. sorta cute. an interesting animal. and also drug-addled!


message 49: by Deedee (new)

Deedee | 136 comments A Dragon. perhaps the most realistic dragon i've ever read about. sorta deadly. sorta cute. an interesting animal. and also drug-addled!

I liked the dragon too!


message 50: by Helen (last edited Apr 11, 2011 02:12PM) (new)

Helen I agree, being Welsh I always like a dragon! I've read part 2 - the mystery deepens is all I'll say.


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