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The Yacoubian Building
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2011cruise book diving(official) > The Yacoubian Building (March/April) 2011

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Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany was the best selling Arabic novel for 2002 and 2003, and was voted Best Novel for 2003 by listeners to Egypt's Middle East Broadcasting Service. It has been translated into 23 languages worldwide.there was also a movie and a TV serial that was based on it .

Enjoy


Valerie (versusthesiren) | 8 comments Bought it today, it sounds really interesting. :O


okyrhoe | 141 comments I have already read it and recommend it. Given the recent developments in Egypt, I look forward to an interesting discussion later here in this group!


toria (vikz writes) (victoriavikzwrites) Just put on my TBR list, Looking forward to reading.


message 5: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 04, 2011 10:56AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
I am also looking forward to an interesting discussion , I read it and watched the movie years ago , I may read with you again !

Okyrhoe , you are right ; it express directly most of the reasons of the Egyptian revolution , even the author ( Alaa Al Aswany) was one of the revolution zealous supporters , he has a very popular non-fiction book (why do not Egyptian make a revolution ?) Not sure if this will be its translation On the State of Egypt: A Novelist's Provocative Reflections.


message 6: by Melanie (new)

Melanie | 4 comments Just requested from the library; hopefully it should arrive soon.


message 7: by Marieke, Former moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Marieke | 1179 comments Mod
i have read this but want to read it again AND i want to watch the movie. i'm curious...does anyone know/remember if it contains any scenes of extremely graphic violence like "Wolf Dreams"? i don't actually have a copy in hand just yet. i will poke around some reviews, too. i only want to know for my developing "early warning system" for readers who wish to avoid reading books that depict extreme violence.


Trisha (trishadeegan) Nile daughter wrote: "The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany was the best selling Arabic novel for 2002 and 2003, and was voted Best Novel for 2003 by listeners to Egypt's Middle East B..."

Hi,
I just completed the book. It was very clearly written and expressed so many things through this relatively small community of people. I adored it. The author was interviewed on World Book Club podcast. Check their backlist if you are interested in what he had to say. I liked his views on the role of the novelist. Trish


Bernadette (bernadettesimpson) | 205 comments I'm only about 60 pages into it, but am loving every word! I especially appreciated the preface where the author describes how he tried to get the book published.

I haven't listened to it yet, but here's the link to the podcast that Trish is referring to:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/art...


Trisha (trishadeegan) Bernadette wrote: "I'm only about 60 pages into it, but am loving every word! I especially appreciated the preface where the author describes how he tried to get the book published.

I haven't listened to it yet, but..."


thanks B, This is a wonderful literary podcast for everyone to enjoy. I subscribe to many but this is my abs favorite. Very upbeat and very multicultural. Trish


Valerie (versusthesiren) | 8 comments Yeah, wow, I'm only 64 pages in but I really love the prose. I'd continue reading if I wasn't so tired, but I expect the rest to go quickly once I pick it up again tomorrow. :)


message 12: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 09, 2011 02:14AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
So Trish and Bernadette finished it , great ! Waiting for the rest .:D
BTW , thanks for the interview link , I have not finish it ye.
Does any one have any suggestions for what is expected from this discussion , or how do you want it ?

I found some Questions for Discussion , will it be better to start with them by the end of the month ?


Trisha (trishadeegan) Nile daughter wrote: "So Trish and Bernadette finished it , great ! Waiting for the rest .:D
BTW , thanks for the interview link , I have not finish it ye.
Does any one have any suggestions for what is expected from t..."


as you like...sounds interesting. trish


Bernadette (bernadettesimpson) | 205 comments Yep, finished. Completely engrossed, I was!

And I have to admit, the thought I had most while reading was, "I can't believe this was published in Egypt!" Not sure what they says about me and my knowledge of local literature or the censorship issues here...

Those are some good discussion questions you found, Nile Daughter! Perhaps we can each choose and respond to one in a post here and then let the discussion go where it will?


Valerie (versusthesiren) | 8 comments I finished it yesterday. I must have been hoping for a happier ending for some of the characters, because I was quite sad by the end, haha. Beautifully written, though.


message 16: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 13, 2011 03:57AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Bernadette wrote: "Yep, finished. Completely engrossed, I was!

And I have to admit, the thought I had most while reading was, "I can't believe this was published in Egypt!" Not sure what they says about me and my k..."


Yes ! Asswany is known for breaking taboos , all kinds ! if you ever read Chicago, you will wonder how Mubarak let it out !

********
For the questions , if anyone feels like to start even with a one as Bernadette suggested... go ahead ; I see several members already finished it ! :) otherwise we can wait until the end of the month and see the others :)


message 17: by Natalie (new) - added it

Natalie  | 59 comments Marieke wrote: "i have read this but want to read it again AND i want to watch the movie. i'm curious...does anyone know/remember if it contains any scenes of extremely graphic violence like "Wolf Dreams"? i don't..."

I have just finished this book and found it to be an interesting read, although personally I would have preferred less characters and more depth. This book does contain some graphic violence, yet I haven't read Wolf Dreams and therefore cannot compare the two.


Alicatte | 14 comments Nile daughter wrote: "I am also looking forward to an interesting discussion , I read it and watched the movie years ago , I may read with you again !..."

I am not surprised that there is a movie version. I'm only 23 pages into it, but it seems very cinematic--all the cross-cutting of scenes, strong renderings of personalities. I can completely visualize the characters and location.


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
I am glad Natalie finished it ,you know I felt that using so many characters was to draw a general portrait of what is happenning then,they where just samples .

waiting for you Alicatte :) and you know the movie was 90% honest bringing the story to the screen , just changed some ends , but none became happier as Valerie wished for .


Alicatte | 14 comments Nile daughter wrote: "waiting for you Alicatte :)..." Don't let me hold you back. Let the games begin!


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Alicatte wrote: "Nile daughter wrote: "waiting for you Alicatte :)..." Don't let me hold you back. Let the games begin!"

It is ok , I posted the question in my post 12 , if anyone wants to pick one and start the discussion ..just go ahead ;)


message 22: by Natalie (new) - added it

Natalie  | 59 comments Alicatte wrote:
I am not surprised that there is a movie..."


I had the exact same thoughts upon reading this book, maybe I can find the movie somewhere.

@ Niledaughter Thank you for posting the link to the questions. More on that below...

(view spoiler)


message 23: by Natalie (new) - added it

Natalie  | 59 comments Bernadette wrote: "I'm only about 60 pages into it, but am loving every word! I especially appreciated the preface where the author describes how he tried to get the book published.

I haven't listened to it yet, but..."


Bernadette, thank you very much for posting this link. The interview was very interesting.


Valerie (versusthesiren) | 8 comments Natalie wrote: "Alicatte wrote:
I am not surprised that there is a movie..."

I had the exact same thoughts upon reading this book, maybe I can find the movie somewhere.

@ Niledaughter Thank you for posting the ..."


I felt the same regarding Taha. Honestly, I was really hoping that (view spoiler)

Also, (view spoiler)


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
I do not know how you make that (hide spoiler) link ! :( :( advice please

sould we start discussing your points openly ? or just use (hide spoiler) and go on ?


Valerie (versusthesiren) | 8 comments Ahhh, you can make the spoilers by writing [spoiler]text goes here[/spoiler], but with < > in place of [ ]. Or we could discuss them openly, if everyone agrees!


message 27: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 21, 2011 05:40AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Natalie wrote: "Alicatte wrote:
I am not surprised that there is a movie..."

I had the exact same thoughts upon reading this book, maybe I can find the movie somewhere.

@ Niledaughter Thank you for posting the ..."


Natalie , yes indeed … fairness and equality , this is the key word for everything .

Valeri , Thanks :D (view spoiler)


Alicatte | 14 comments Should be we using the "spoiler" technique? I will since everyone else is. In response to Valerie's comment #24.... (view spoiler)


message 29: by Natalie (new) - added it

Natalie  | 59 comments Homosexuality is a "non-issue" in my community; it's like being blonde or brunette, so I was a little disturbed by the way homosexuality was dealt with in the book. It opened my eyes to the fact that there still is a huge part of humanity who believes that homosexuality is a sin/wrong/unnatural etc. I think there is still a lot of potential for healing deep wounds...as these kind of things actually do happen (I remember a German Fashion Designer being killed in the same fashion, no pun intended) and homosexuals have been and still are prosecuted in some countries (I remember the gay couple who wanted to get married in Malawi).

But to get back to the book, it is only after I listened to Aswany's interview that I fully realized that his depiction of homosexuals (maybe due to ignorance on my part) is meant to display homosexuality as something acceptable. It definitely got me thinking and also questioning myself.


message 30: by Niledaughter (last edited Feb 25, 2012 11:28PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Enough spoiler alerts ! from now and on all posts are spoiler alerts in general :)

I believe death or failure was the general atmosphere in the novel (there is no freedom or justice ) and it was not related in particular to homosexuality , Hatim was a victim himself from all over the beginning by representing (Children sexual abuse) and Abdu was a victim because it was not his natural choice , he was also being used .

In our communities -in general - homosexuality is a sin; also Incest or even adultery . true such actions or behaviors exist (still part of humanity…right or wrong , ratio high or low ) but they are not the domain features of oriental societies . Religion is still a very powerful element in our culture and as you know ; wither it is for Islam or Christianity ; it will make no difference .


I forgot …I need to continue hearing that interview !

Alicatte wrote: " Only Zaki's story ended with a form of life or future--the marriage to the young woman--which I thought represented a union of the Egypt of the past and the Egypt of the future "

That is the best explanation I read !


message 31: by okyrhoe (last edited Mar 22, 2011 10:01AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

okyrhoe | 141 comments Nile daughter wrote: "I believe death or failure was the general atmosphere in the novel (there is no freedom or justice)"

Certainly too many of the characters end up badly, but maybe their deaths are meant to emphasize the unfair & unjust nature of what they endure in life.
In my interpretation, I see an attempt by the author to highlight the similarities between different kinds of oppression.
For example, Taha's mistreatment by his superiors (the police, the jihadi trainers) is equally as oppressive as the exploitation suffered by the young woman, Busayna*.
Abduh is also victimized in the sense that he didn't "ask" to become a homosexual. Why is that any more shocking than Busayna's* subjugations & humiliations as a woman?
I understand Aswany's depiction of the homosexual affair, even though I don't agree with it. Yes, it appears "anachronistic" to a liberally-oriented reader, but in the scheme of the novel it's meant to be another example of the power play between the haves and the have nots. The submissive male homosexual is on the same level as the woman: judged (unfairly) by one's reputation and one's honor in the public sphere despite what goes on in private, and with no recourse to justice. I feel that Aswany is maybe even hinting it may be worse for male homosexuals: because it's harder to whitewash one's reputation, or to escape the wrath of society. Busayna can expunge the accusations of prostitution simply by getting married.

In my review I wrote about the ending chosen by the author: He wraps up the loose ends of the novel by marrying off the two survivors - the elder Zaki and the younger Busayna - but for me that is a compromise, a cop-out. If she is to represent the Egypt of the future, why does the author revert back to traditional values (marriage as a lifesaving choice for women)?

As women and homosexuals are (sexually) taken advantage of, oppression on a higher level comes in the form of political exploitation by those in power: men enter politics only for the purpose of securing financial success through extortion and bribery, and radical religious leaders fool their ideological followers into doing something that has a political rather than religious purpose.
Does Aswany imply that before the big injustices (corruption in the realms of government, religion, and business) can be dealt with, the "smaller" injustices, the social/moral oppressions that are perpetrated by one individual on the other, need to be addressed first? I would like to think that's the question Aswany raises, although he doesn't offer any concrete solution on how this can be resolved.
I see this as the challenge of Egypts's recent "revolution": the figurehead tyrant is gone, but the quotidian sources of oppression/inequality/injustice/etc remain.

I agree with Nathalie's post above; what happens between Hatim & Abduh in their final confrontation doesn't "add up" (even though such tragic incidents do occur everywhere) it just seemed so out of character, especially in Hatim's case (blind rage vs. his previous cosmopolitan gentility).
If there is any narrative weakness in the novel, it is as Natalie mentions (& in my review), that character development is weak overall. What transpires is more often due to circumstance rather than personal choice. All too often what happens is precisely what the character *doesn't* wish, as if they have no say in the matter. The schematics of the story's plot override the psychological complexity of the characters. So it's not easy to take a side or to identify with a particular character.

I find that the analysis of the novel is more "political" than "literary", because of this.
Rather than analyzing character & intention in the novel, one is more likely to debate the historical, political, legal, & moral issues in the novel, as in the preceding posts.


*That's the spelling in my edition, I think the correct pronounciation is Buthayna.


Sheila | 89 comments I've found an ebook copy of this so I shall be reading it and posting on it once I have finished my current read (which by the way is Lyrics Alley by Leila Aboulela after someone mentioning it here so thanks for the recommendation)

Thanks also for ceasing with those spoiler alert hides. On another Goodreads board I belong to we adopt the practice of just writing "SPOILER ......." within our texts - I quite like this as you can be disciplined enough to stop reading if you don't want to know or you can continue to read the post if it either doesn't bother you or you have finished the read. I have to say that for me and for that board, this technique seems to work well.


message 33: by Marieke, Former moderator (new) - rated it 4 stars

Marieke | 1179 comments Mod
I want to reread this book...everyone's posts are so thoughtful and causing me to remember a lot of stuff from the book. i'll repeat what Carly said in a different thread--i'm really happy members want to actually discuss our books! :D

oh, and i'd also like to see the movie.

btw, sheila--a friend is sending me her copy of Lyrics Alley because she really wants to know what i think (this area is newish to her). i'm really excited to read it! we can have a thread for it in the Salon. :D


message 34: by Hiba (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hiba Essa (hibaessa) | 23 comments This book has jumped to being one of the top on my "to read" list!

I remember avoiding the movie as I insisted on reading the book first!

In light of the current circumstances in egypt, there couldnt be a better time to read the book!


message 35: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 24, 2011 01:08AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Okyrhoe, it is always interesting to read your thoughts ! :)

The submissive male homosexual is on the same level as the woman: judged (unfairly) by one's reputation and one's honor in the public sphere despite what goes on in private, and with no recourse to justice. I feel that Aswany is maybe even hinting it may be worse for male homosexuals: because it's harder to whitewash one's reputation, or to escape the wrath of society. Busayna can expunge the accusations of prostitution simply by getting married.

True , you know what ,even in most women rape cases , if rapper offers to marry the victim and she accepts , case could be closed .

oppression on a higher level comes in the form of political exploitation by those in power: men enter politics only for the purpose of securing financial success through extortion and bribery, and radical religious leaders fool their ideological followers into doing something that has a political rather than religious purpose.

Can not agree more !

I find that the analysis of the novel is more "political" than "literary", because of this.
Rather than analyzing character & intention in the novel, one is more likely to debate the historical, political, legal, & moral issues in the novel, as in the preceding posts.


That is really how I read Aswany in general . he is simply a revolutionary figure more than he is a literature author ; that even makes him aggressive sometimes , he had a big argument with the former Prime minister (Ahmed Shafiek) on a live TV show ; fastening his steps to resign , in my personal opinion he said the right thing but in the wrong format ! so it cost him big deal of his popularity

N.B
Yes in Arabic ; it was Buthayna not Busayna , but note that the first is the way we write it (standered Arabic) but the second is the way we pronounce it in Egyptian dialect .

********
Sheila and Hiba , waiting for you to join :)

Marieke , I would really appreciate reading your opinion and Sheila’s opinion in about (Lyrics Alley ) in the salon , it will be very interesting to read about the relation of Egypt and Sudan!


message 36: by Hiba (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hiba Essa (hibaessa) | 23 comments What a fresh start to the day reading everyones thoughts and views on the book!!

Ive got less than a 100 pages to go and so far this is what I think:

My heart ached for Egypt, really. I found it troubling to read at the start because the author touched on subjects that many would like to turn a blind eye to and even deny it simply because it is easier to.

I couldnt help picturing the occupants of a once elegant, now aging building which pretty much sums up Egypt today - economically, politically, sexually etc. He gave us a glimpse of life in all social stratas and political backgrounds.

My only reservations on the book are too many characters!! I would have preferred less characters and more depth into each of their lives.

I now look forward to watching the movie this weekend...


Sheila | 89 comments I got started on this today and am about 60 pages in - I'm reading an ebook version so not sure how my page numbers will compare to hard/paperbacks but I just got up to Zaki arriving home and Dawlat discovering the ring is missing. I'm back at work during the week so it will probably take me the rest of the week to finish it. I don't have a problem with spoilers and have enjoyed reading this thread so far. Interestingly my copy gives a list of characters at the beginning which is very helpful

Re Taha 's story I am left with the sneaking suspicion that the person he bribed to sign off his false statement of his father's job simply went to someone else and got paid again to reveal it - just goes to show you, one should never lie on job applications :)

I wanted to post at this point because the passage I just finished where the author cites all the reasons for tension between Zaki and Dawlat is a great résumé of the stresses living together brings... "from one using the bathroom for a long time when the other wants it, from one seeing the sullen face the other wears when he wakes from sleeping, from one wanting silence while the other insists in talking, from t he mere presence of another person who never leaves you day and night, who stares at you, who interrupts you, who picks on everything you say, and the grating of whose molars when he chews sets you on edge, and the ringing noise of whose spoon striking the dishes disturbs your quiet every time he sits down to eat with you" Oh so true - I'd probably just add "who squeezes the toothpaste in the middle when you squeeze it from the end" - I'm sure we could all add in others, but I thought this was a very good insight into how it is the small things which kill a relationship.

I’ll probably say more about the cultural differences regarding views on homosexuality once I have read the pertinent parts of this book, but I think there is an interesting discussion to be had there - the Harper Collins reading guide does suggest this as one of its discussion topic “Do you think moral judgment of pedophilia and homosexuality can be mutable, varying across cultures, or should there be more stringent, universal views?”

For me one of the reasons for joining a culturally diverse reading group like this is to listen views from other cultures on topics which impact everyone but which can be viewed in many different ways and through different lenses - by way of example, in post 35 Nile daughter writes “you know what ,even in most women rape cases , if rapper offers to marry the victim and she accepts , case could be closed” In my home country this would just never happen – a proposal of marriage would most likely be seen as adding insult to injury – and just today I see in the Indian news how Delhi is becoming a rape crisis city as its populations experience rapidly divergent expectations brought about by quite disparate experiences of socio- economic change

Okyrhoe wrote in her great post no. 31 I find that the analysis of the novel is more "political" than "literary", because of this. Rather than analyzing character & intention in the novel, one is more likely to debate the historical, political, legal, & moral issues in the novel, as in the preceding posts. I agree. I am reminded of how journalists in Argentina at the time of the junta used to write about football, something of a national hobby :) , but the public knew their football stories were to be read as political commentaries not just sporting ones, as a way to by pass the print media censors. What I am thinking with Al Aswany is that like Mahfouz he is a political commentator but not in the same league as a writer . Ok at this point I’ll remember that I am only ¼ of the way through and get back to reading :)


message 38: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 29, 2011 01:16AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Hiba wrote: "My heart ached for Egypt, really. I found it troubling to read at the start because the author touched on subjects that many would like to turn a blind eye to and even deny it simply because it is easier to.

I couldnt help picturing the occupants of a once elegant, now aging building which pretty much sums up Egypt today - economically, politically, sexually etc. He gave us a glimpse of life in all social stratas and political backgrounds..."


:)

Sheila , interesting post !

Sheila wrote: "For me one of the reasons for joining a culturally diverse reading group like this is to listen views from other cultures on topics which impact everyone but which can be viewed in many different ways and through different lenses - by way of example, in post 35 Nile daughter writes “you know what ,even in most women rape cases , if rapper offers to marry the victim and she accepts , case could be closed” In my home country this would just never happen – a proposal of marriage would most likely be seen as adding insult to injury – and just today I see in the Indian news how Delhi is becoming a rape crisis city as its populations experience rapidly divergent expectations brought about by quite disparate experiences of socio- economic change..."

For the rapping point , I wanted to make a point clearer , in my society there is different between law and tradition , honor - as it was even discussed before in Okyrhoe's post- is a domain concept .( did you hear of honour crimes before?) , so unfortunately in low educated layers (sometimes in high layers but still frightened of facing the community ..pity, doubts …shame ..etc) ; covering the case (like if it never happened) can be a better solution , (in the novel , Bothaina was not raped – yet getting involved in a prostitution case is a destruction to her honor , and marriage is the solution to save it ) . back to rape cases ; authority can not force people - if they do not want - to press charges , but there are brave people who do that and our law has no mercy in such cases , if a man is convicted for rape ; it is going to be hanging to death waiting for him , imagine the paradox we face !
Here is a case where 10 males will be hanged for kidnapping and raping a woman :


Sheila | 89 comments Nile daughter, yes I am aware of honour crimes, we do have them in the UK as well, but they are not common. It generates an interesting debate about maintaining v changing cultural perspectives when living in another culture. I face this dilemma on a much much lesser scale here in India. I don't want to take the discussion thread away from the book but if you are interested The Independent newspaper in the UK ran a series of articles last year by well a respected English journalist living for many years in Beruit


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Sheila wrote: "Nile daughter, yes I am aware of honour crimes, we do have them in the UK as well, but they are not common. It generates an interesting debate about maintaining v changing cultural perspectives wh..."

This was a very interesting article! Thanks
I know such discussion may take us out of topic here , but it is also a rich field of interactions and understanding .So if anyone is interested in discussing any topic much further ; we will open an independent thread for it .
BTW we had a detailed discussion about Gender Relations in Muslim Countries and Islamic Feminism in Goodreads Africa .


message 41: by Wendy (new) - added it

Wendy (wendywoo) | 240 comments Sheila wrote: "Nile daughter, yes I am aware of honour crimes, we do have them in the UK as well, but they are not common. It generates an interesting debate about maintaining v changing cultural perspectives wh..."

That was a really interesting article Sheila. Thanks for posting the link. I'd be interesed in a side-topic discussion thread on this issue.


message 42: by okyrhoe (last edited Mar 30, 2011 02:21AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

okyrhoe | 141 comments Nile daughter wrote: "I wanted to make a point clearer , in my society there is different between law and tradition , honor - as it was even discussed before in Okyrhoe's post- is a domain concept"...
"(in the novel , Bothaina was not raped – yet getting involved in a prostitution case is a destruction to her honor , and marriage is the solution to save it)"

The concept of honor I consider one of the major themes of Aswany's novel. The message I understand the author is expressing goes beyond the political corruption and duplicity, it's also about how the "traditional" concept of honor is being mis-used to suit one's material objectives.

I don't want to presume I can adequately define the concept of honor in Egyptian culture. Having lived in the ME for many years though I hope I am able to understand (as opposed to being able to define!) what "honor" implies.

And I don't think that honor is such an alien issue to non-MENA people. It's a concept that is still strong in other cultures (eg. Japan, China) but also evidenced in Europe/N.America as well - although we don't readily admit to it.

In the link Nile Daughter made to the Africa group's discussion on gender relations there's a mention to the Afghan "tradition" of raising girls as boys. A similar phenomenon is the "kanun" (canon/tradition) in Albania & Montenegro where women become men to protect the family honor. It may be a good example of illustrating that "honor" is beyond religion (both Christian and Moslem Albanian women follow the "kanun") and beyond the legal system.

Another example to illustrate how "honor" is understood and how it works as a socializing construct is this recent advertising campaign in the US promoting "traditional" foods from Greece/ME, where the grandmother (YiaYia) speaks disparagingly about the "modern" ways. The first one exemplifies how "prostitution" is understood as something more than its literal definition.


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Wendy wrote: "That was a really interesting article Sheila. Thanks for posting the link. I'd be interesed in a side-topic discussion thread on this issue. ..."

I opened a thread for discussion in here


message 44: by Niledaughter (last edited Mar 30, 2011 02:59AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Okyrhoe , I will come back and read your post again (I read it fast), but I wish we can move the discussion to the new thread if you do not mind :)

Edit (after re-reading):
I realy like this honor area discussion and I think the two examples you posted are very interesting !


Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 106 comments It's on the way into our branch for me - in transit - that's the term they use in LibrarianSpeak.

So I should have it for tomorrow or Wednesday - looking forward to it.


Niledaughter | 2793 comments Mod
Carly wrote: "It's on the way into our branch for me - in transit - that's the term they use in LibrarianSpeak.

So I should have it for tomorrow or Wednesday - looking forward to it."


Waiting for you :)


Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 106 comments Got it - from looking at the wee intro, I see it's pretty well true to form, as to what the original building is/was.

It must be intriguing for readers who have actually lived/live in that same place.

When we got home from our errands, my bones were aching (my ma didn't pay cash for 'em, so I can't turn them in). So I took some Ty for Art and slept ... deeeeeeply.

I'm going to get a half hour in before Jeff turns on the western movie - I know I'll want to watch that - I love westerns.

Too bad it wasn't something that doesn't interest me, then I could spend the rest of the evening reading.

Realistically, I'll have some of it read by tomorrow night.


message 48: by Carly (last edited Apr 12, 2011 04:54PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 106 comments Just going by what Okyroe's saying, I'm itchin' to get into this one.

I am surprised to see it's a common thing to put the girls out to fight ... well, I'm surprised at how young the boys get sent out.

But, were our society here in Toronto up against the proverbial wall, and needed to defend ourselves in the way of a 'civil war' kinda' thing, yes, we ladies would be out there waving our brooms - ha ha!

'Twouldn't be much ha ha if such a thing really happened though - I don't like fights much. Even little scraps such as one I'm having with a woman in our building now fails to hold my interest after 24 hours.

Wouldn't mind lobbing an egg onto her balcony, or something like that though.

(just kidding ... i wouldn't do anything of the kind, of course ;-)

But what I'm saying is that I suspect, in any culture, it's like Stephen King says in his novel 'Lise's Story' ... SOWISA! Which means?

Strap
On
Whenever
It
Seems
Appropriate

I'll read a bit of 'book', then get into these scintillating discussions ... you can see me rubbing my hands together.


Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 106 comments Here's a page of film clips at You Tube ...

http://www.youtube.com/results?search...


Carly Svamvour (faganlady) | 106 comments Ahhh ... now this gives me a good idea of what it looks like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhgs9p...

THAT's what I was looking for.


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