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AUDIOBOOKS/PODCASTS/KINDLES > WHAT IS EVERYBODY LISTENING TO NOW?

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 28, 2011 11:42AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
This is a thread to discuss what audiobook you are listening to right now.

Please add a bookcover, the author's photo if available and the author's link. If you can add a photo of the narrator and a little bit about them; that would be great too.

Also, tell us a little bit about the audiobook and why you like it or not.

This thread was recommended by Michael.


message 2: by Michael (last edited Feb 28, 2011 12:33PM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) I am listening to
The Last Hero A Discworld Fable / Poslednij geroj. Skazanie o Ploskom Mire by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett narrated by Stephen Briggs

After the marathon listen that was
Che Guevara A Revolutionary Life by Jon Lee Anderson by Jon Lee Anderson by Jon Lee Anderson I thought something a bit lighter was called for.

In this Discworld book a group of very senior "Heroes", or as we would call them barbarians are on a final quest to really get under the Gods skin.


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
How did you like either of them Michael? How was the narration and would you recommend either one?


message 4: by Kristi (last edited Feb 28, 2011 03:26PM) (new)

Kristi (kristicoleman) I just finished The Story of Stuff How Our Obsession with Stuff is Trashing the Planet, Our Communities, and our Health—and a Vision for Change by Annie Leonard by Annie Leonard Annie Leonard

The author read it and I thought she and the book were fabulous...althought you won't find me out shopping much after listening to it. I definetly recommend the book!

Also, I have to say, anything narrated by Patrick Lawlor is a must listen to. My favorites by him are:

Merle's Door Lessons from a Freethinking Dog by Ted Kerasote by Ted Kerasote Ted Kerasote

The Night Stalkers by Michael J. Durant by Michael J. Durant

Roughneck Nine-One The Extraordinary Story of a Special Forces A-team at War by Frank Antenori by Frank Antenori

Generation Kill by Evan Wright by Evan Wright Evan Wright

But by far the best is Merles Door!!


message 5: by Tom (new)

Tom Recently found out I can download audio-books from my library, so I am giving it a shot. I started listening to "The Poison King" last week, a book I have wanted for a while. I am enjoying it, wishing I had some maps though..

The Poison King The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy by Adrienne Mayor by Adrienne Mayor
(no idea on narrator, no audio version in goodreads)


message 6: by Kristi (new)

Kristi (kristicoleman) it looks like the version available of The Poison King has the Narrator as Paul Hecht

The Poison King The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy by Adrienne Mayor by Adrienne Mayor narrator Paul Hecht


message 7: by Tom (new)

Tom Well this is horrible..

The Poison King The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy by Adrienne Mayor by Adrienne Mayor

In the middle of segment 8/16 there is about a 5 minute gap of silence! Mithridates was about to attack Rhodes!
Does this kind of thing happen often in audiobooks?


message 8: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Tom wrote: "Well this is horrible..

The Poison King The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy by Adrienne Mayor by Adrienne Mayor

In the middle of segment 8/16 there ..."


First time I have heard of such a long gap. But I agree no good.


message 9: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Bentley wrote: "How did you like either of them Michael? How was the narration and would you recommend either one?"

Hi Bentley I always recommend Terry Pratchet novels. Those who do not like him have something wrong with them :) The narrator Stephen Briggs does a good job with some great character voices. Though I feel that no one does Pratchet as well as Tony Robinson aka Baldric from Black Adder.

As for Che Guevara A Revolutionary Life by Jon Lee Anderson by Jon Lee Anderson by Jon Lee Anderson

This audiobook was very good the narrator Armando Duran is very engaging and the subject matter well researched.


message 10: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2011 comments Right now I am listening to How To Understand and Appreciate Great Music by Robert Greenberg. It isn't so much a book as a lecture series from The Teaching Company, but since goodreads has it listed I'll count it.

Greenberg is the author and the voice. And he is absolutely excellent. His voice is dynamic and eloquent, his text is informative and interesting, and his subject is fascinating. I very much enjoy and appreciate that he gives brief reviews at the beginning of most of the lectures. Not only does it remind me of what where we are, it also reinforces what he taught before.

Slow going because I don't often have listening time. At this point in my life (i.e. small children), I doubt I'll go the listening route for anything that is also in written form. Perhaps later. But these lectures are really helping me get my feet wet.

How to Listen to and Understand Great Music by Robert Greenberg by Robert Greenberg Robert Greenberg


message 11: by Terri (last edited Mar 02, 2011 06:37PM) (new)

Terri I have just finished listening to;
Intercept by Patrick Robinson by Patrick Robinson
It was a bit too heavy going and I missed large parts as my mind wandered off.

And now I am listening to;
To Defy a King by Elizabeth Chadwick Elizabeth Chadwick by Elizabeth Chadwick

Which is not usually my style. But it was the only audiobook that looked remotely appealing at the library and I need audiobooks to listen to when I am on the treadmill in the mornings.
The narrator reads it as if she is reading to a child and I am not enjoying it.
The narrator is Patience Tomlinson.

I now have Eye of the Needle by Ken Follett Ken Follett by Ken Follett lined up and can plug that in if To Defy a King bothers me too much. :-)


message 12: by Becky (last edited Mar 06, 2011 01:46PM) (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1217 comments I'm currently listening to
Unbroken A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption  by Laura Hillenbrand Laura Hillenbrand by Laura Hillenbrand and finding it much better than I expected. Her last book,

Seabiscuit An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand was also a top listen.

I listen to quite a lot of audio books and often they are history books or historical fiction. I want to check this site for recommendations! Thanks.


message 13: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Becky wrote: "I'm currently listening to
Unbroken A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption  by Laura HillenbrandLaura Hillenbrand by Laura Hillenbrand and finding it much ..."


Hi Becky I love listening to history audio books as well. I find the more hard going ones easier to digest by listening rather then reading them.

I about to start
Tears in the Darkness The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath by Michael Norman by Michael Norman narrated by Michael Prichard.


message 14: by Becky (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1217 comments I've heard some very good things about Tears in the Darkness The Story of the Bataan Death March and Its Aftermath by Michael Norman Let us know.


message 15: by Terri (new)

Terri I am about to start Agincourt by Bernard Cornwell Bernard Cornwell Bernard Cornwell in a few days.


message 16: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Be interested in your thoughts Terri. Its a book of got on my to hear list


message 17: by Elizabeth S (new)

Elizabeth S (esorenson) | 2011 comments Michael wrote: "Be interested in your thoughts Terri. Its a book of got on my to hear list"

I love "to hear list." Perfect. :)


message 18: by Becky (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1217 comments I'm currently listening to A World Lit Only by Fire by William Raymond Manchester by William Raymond Manchester William Manchester.

Let me tell you to skip it - Manchester was pretty good in his prime (popular historian) but he blew it with this one. He still writes well but I think he forgot how to do research. Much of the book sounds like it was taken straight from some primary source, Protestant propaganda archives. I think it's as lurid and as sensational as Manchester could get it to be. The narrator sounds like he has practiced his monotone.

That said, I will finish it just to see what he comes up with next.

I think Manchester's point is that the Medieval mind was filled with such deep dark claptrap that it took blood, gore and rampant sex to free it with the Renaissance.


message 19: by Terri (new)

Terri Michael wrote: "Be interested in your thoughts Terri. Its a book of got on my to hear list"

Slight delay on Azincourt. It was not brought back to the library by the due date. I should have it any day now though.

Will let you know what I think of it, Michael. I love Cornwell's battle/warrior style books...Saxon series, Grail Series, Arthur series. But this will be my first Corwnell as an audio. So, we'll see how it goes.



Agincourt by Bernard Cornwell Bernard Cornwell Bernard Cornwell


message 20: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) I've been listening to my wife yelling at me: "no more books!!!!!"

:)


message 21: by Terri (last edited Mar 16, 2011 10:51PM) (new)

Terri Hmm. Interesting.
Are you saying you won't be recommending that one?
And, is there a long drawn out battle sequence in the end? (no spoilers though :-) )


message 22: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Started listening to Unseen Academicals (Discworld, #37) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett

I am on the discworld push, loving Stephen Briggs as a narrator.


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
'Aussie Rick' wrote: "I've been listening to my wife yelling at me: "no more books!!!!!"

:)"


Aussie Rick...so is that your new audio book? (smile)


message 24: by Michael (last edited Apr 10, 2011 02:19AM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) I am the Terry Pratchett train and nex stop is
Pyramids (Discworld, #7) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett


message 25: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Looks good Michael and I am in catch up mode for all of the books I have lined up.


message 26: by Michael (last edited Apr 11, 2011 06:20AM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) An interseting contrast with narrators in Pyramids (Discworld, #7) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett it is read by Nigel Planer Nigel Planer instead of Stephen Briggs. Why I am enjoying Planer I must admit I prefer Brigg's. Which suprises me for those who do not know Nigel Planer played Niel in the Young Ones, one of my favourite TV shows. But the all time best narrator I have heard reading Pratchett has been Tony Robinson of Black Adder fame.


message 27: by Michael (last edited Apr 15, 2011 02:59AM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Next Pratchett stop is I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld, #38) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett


message 28: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Slight detour in the Pratchett trip. I have managed to source most of the discworld audiobooks so I am going back to book 1
The Colour of Magic & The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett


message 29: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Next stop book 2 The Light Fantastic (Discworld, #2) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett


message 30: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
You are on a roll.


message 31: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Book 3 is up and on my Ipod Equal Rites (Discworld, #3) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett


message 32: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Up to book 4 Mort (Discworld, #4) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett read by Nigel Planer


message 33: by Ivbells (last edited May 22, 2011 11:30AM) (new)

Ivbells I am currently listening to Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt by Steven D. Levitt Steven D. Levitt. So far, I'm really enjoying it. Next one is definitely Good Omens by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett , inspired by Michael, so maybe I can start my own Pratchett train with it :)


message 34: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Ivbells wrote: "I am currently listening to Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt. So far, I'm really enjoying it. Next one is definite..."

The Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett train is a great trip :). I loved both Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and SuperFreakonomics Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes And Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance by Steven D. Levitt so I will be greatly intrested in how they work as an Audiobook Ivbells.


message 35: by Ivbells (new)

Ivbells Thank you Bentley, I think I got it right now:)


message 36: by Ivbells (new)

Ivbells So far Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt is great as an audio, it's narrated by Stephen J. Dubner Stephen J. Dubner.
I'm going on a one week vacation the day after tomorrow, so I'm packing more books than clothes, and Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett's works are definitely included, thanks to you Michael :)


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Ivbells wrote: "Thank you Bentley, I think I got it right now:)"

Yes you do Ivbells, great job.


message 38: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (barbara55) | 23 comments Just started
The First Tycoon The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt by T.J. Stiles T.J. Stiles


message 39: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Got piping into my ears Operation Mincemeat How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victory by Ben MacIntyre by Ben MacIntyre Ben MacIntyre


message 40: by Mary (new)

Mary (johnsonmaryj) | 2 comments I'm listening to To End All Wars To End All Wars A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild by Adam Hochschild Adam Hochschild


message 41: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Mary wrote: "I'm listening to To End All Wars To End All Wars A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild by Adam Hochschild Adam Hochschild"

I heard good things about this book. Mary, good job on the citation, don't forget to add an author link with the image:

To End All Wars A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918 by Adam Hochschild by Adam Hochschild Adam Hochschild


message 42: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Good to see more hoping on board the Audio train :)


message 43: by Jason (new)

Jason | 104 comments I listen to A LOT of audio books. Recently finished Lost in Shangri-La A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II by Mitchell Zuckoff by Mitchell Zuckoff Mitchell Zuckoff and I'm listening to Cleopatra A Life by Stacy Schiff by Stacy Schiff Stacy Schiff. I really enjoyed Lost in Shangri-La and would recommend it to anyone, not just history buffs. Cleopatra is a little different, great for history people, but might be boring for those not already interested in history.


message 44: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Thanks Jason for pointing out the differences in listening style and background for the two books.

We look forward to any suggestions that you might have on audiobooks you have enjoyed and are listening to.

Bentley


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jun 03, 2011 06:01AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
Right now I am listening to:

What is the What by Dave Eggers

What is the What by Dave Eggers by Dave Eggers Dave Eggers

Excellent.

Awards:

Best Book of the Year-San Francisco Chronicle, National Book Critics' Circle Award Nominee for Fiction, New York Times Notable Book of the Year, Independent Publishers Award (IPPY) for Literary Fiction (2007), Medicis Prize (France) (2009)

Publsher's Synopsis:

Valentino Achak Deng, real-life hero of this engrossing epic, was a refugee from the Sudanese civil war-the bloodbath before the current Darfur bloodbath-of the 1980s and 90s. In this fictionalized memoir, Eggers (A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius) makes him an icon of globalization. Separated from his family when Arab militia destroy his village, Valentino joins thousands of other "Lost Boys," beset by starvation, thirst and man-eating lions on their march to squalid refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya, where Valentino pieces together a new life. He eventually reaches America, but finds his quest for safety, community and fulfillment in many ways even more difficult there than in the camps: he recalls, for instance, being robbed, beaten and held captive in his Atlanta apartment. Eggers's limpid prose gives Valentino an unaffected, compelling voice and makes his narrative by turns harrowing, funny, bleak and lyrical. The result is a horrific account of the Sudanese tragedy, but also an emblematic saga of modernity-of the search for home and self in a world of unending upheaval.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Dave Eggers is best known for A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius (2000), and here he shows that he is as adroit at telling another person's biography as he is narrating his own. Over three years, he conducted 100 hours of interviews with Deng and visited Sudan with him in "synergistic collaboration" (Time). Labeled as a novel, this work nonetheless has a historical basis and lends a personal face to the brutality of civil war, squalor, and the struggle for survival. A few critics questioned where Deng's story ended and Eggers's literary license began, and the book as a whole could have been better edited. While visceral and heartrending, Deng's and Eggers's joint story is ultimately a powerful tale of hope. When both People and the ever-glum Michiko Kakutani of the New York Times rave, how can one resist?

Here is a history of how and why the book came about - very interesting:

History of the Foundation

Valentino Achak Deng met Dave Eggers in January 2003 in Atlanta, where Valentino had been living since his resettlement to the United States in 2001. He was working while attending community college, and was already well known as a captivating public speaker and spokesman for the Sudanese community. Valentino contacted Dave with the help of his friend Mary Williams, who was the founder of an Atlanta-based organization called the Lost Boys Foundation.

After spending a weekend with Dave in Atlanta, Valentino asked him to help write his autobiography. He felt that his story could convey to the world the realities of what had happened in the civil war in Southern Sudan, and its effect on the people there. Dave agreed to help, and they began the process of recording Valentino’s story—a process that took three years of steady work.

Early on, Valentino and Dave decided that any and all proceeds from the book would be controlled by Valentino and used to help the Sudanese community. Valentino knew immediately that he would send most of the funds home to his village of Marial Bai. When he returned there with Dave during the writing of the book, he was overwhelmed by the difficulties facing his people. Southern Sudan was (and still is) recovering from war, and the extreme damage to infrastructure has left most of the region in poverty.

Valentino decided that he would use the funds from What Is the What to provide better educational opportunities for the Sudanese both in Southern Sudan and in the United States. To help achieve his goals, Valentino established the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation in the fall of 2006. Its creation coincided with the publication of What Is the What. All proceeds from the book are donated—and will continue to be donated, as it’s published in paperback and overseas—directly to Valentino’s cause.

The Foundation's first major project is the construction of an educational center in Valentino's hometown of Marial Bai. Working closely with the local community, the Foundation is building a large educational complex, consisting of:

the region's first-ever high school
a teachers' training college
a public library
sports facilities
a community center

During the summer of 2007, Valentino returned to Marial Bai to talk with the community, consult government leaders in the region, and lay the groundwork for this project. In early 2008, he returned to start construction on the secondary school, on a large plot of land that was donated by local government. A Sudanese architect designed the structures, bricks were made locally, and all of the construction workers were from the Marial Bai region.

The Marial Bai Secondary School opened in May 2009. It is the first fully-functional high school in the entire region, where there are no other opportunities for students—and especially girls—to continue their education past the elementary level. In spring 2010, we constructed a girls' dormitory, to provide a safe learning environment and an alternative to early marriage for hundreds of young women in the region.

As the Foundation grows and its projects develop, it will largely depend on fundraising to achieve and sustain its goals. Valentino plans to keep working to help the Sudanese in Southern Sudan and the United States, and his dreams will only be limited by the funding that the Foundation receives.

Soure:

http://www.valentinoachakdeng.org/


message 46: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Sounds like a goo listen Bentley I am keen to hear your thought on it.


message 47: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jun 03, 2011 05:48AM) (new)

Bentley | 44168 comments Mod
It is extremely different; I think that it is better as an audio because of the narrator frankly.

I have added some info on the book above in post 45.


message 48: by Michael (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) The narrator in my opinion in audiobooks can make or break the story.


message 49: by Jason (new)

Jason | 104 comments Michael wrote: "The narrator in my opinion in audiobooks can make or break the story."

I agree Michael!


message 50: by Michael (last edited Jun 21, 2011 01:59AM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (loboz) Started listening to discworld book Guards! Guards! (Discworld, #8) by Terry Pratchett by Terry Pratchett Terry Pratchett narrated by Nigel Planer. I got 30 minutes into the book and chuffed to find a character that Nigel Planer uses his Niel from The Young Ones voice.


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