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Monthly "READS" > February 2011 reads

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JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
List the books you read last month here.


message 2: by RNOCEAN (new)

RNOCEAN | 93 comments http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/...

Of course, I gave 5 stars to The Red Garden by Alice Hoffman. The book on William and Harry was also a good read. I never tire of reading about the British monarch. I can trace a lot of my heritage back to the British!


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I think I only had 5-6 five-star books in the last 6 months, and The Red Grden was one of them.

You can see my 8 February reads here:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/...


message 4: by Reeves (new)

Reeves Honey | 142 comments I always look up the books you have read. I will research them later! I really liked Look Again but would not read another of this author's works as I do not like anything about lawyers and I do not do mysteries or series. If she did anther stand alone,maybe.
I would love to mail my SIL the book about if I lived in this house......


message 6: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Mar 01, 2011 06:21PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
R. wrote: "I always look up the books you have read. I will research them later! I really liked Look Again but would not read another of this author's works as I do not like anything about lawyers and I do ..."

I do not mind books about lawyers if they are accurate. Being married to a lawyer, I am pretty picky. I also do not like mysteries. Read too many of them when I had little ones.


message 7: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 01, 2011 05:21PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) It's interesting how we all have genre's that we can't abide or shy away from. For me that would be science fiction, historical fiction (I rather read a nonfiction account of the topic), magical realism and chick lit. There are probably more, but these came to my mind first.

What genres aren't your thing ?


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments I generally stay away from the same genres that you do, Alias, as well as romance novels, except that I will very occasionally read a chick lit book, and I have read a few magical realism books over the years. I do enjoy mysteries/ thrillers, though, but of course there are certain types of those that I shy away from (I have no tolerance for Tamara Myers books).

Sometimes I leave my "comfort zone" for book group selections, and I have usually not been sorry.


message 9: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) Carolyn, I seldom read romance books either.

I used to read a lot of legal thrillers, but I haven't in a very long time. Though I am on the hold list at my library for The Confession~John Grisham


message 10: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Alias Reader wrote: "Carolyn, I seldom read romance books either.

I used to read a lot of legal thrillers, but I haven't in a very long time. Though I am on the hold list at my library for [book:The Confession|793..."


Alias, you have probably read a similar novel by someone else. He just used the novel as a vehicle for his anti death-penalty views. Been there, read that!


message 11: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) It's going to be awhile before I get to the Grisham book. There were 300 ahead of me. I think I am down to 60 now.


message 12: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments Had a bit of an up and down month reading wise (a couple of my favorite authors let me down) and have managed to catch a cold just when I have to start working six days a week. Here are my February reads:

Top Read

Into Thin Air A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster by Jon Krakauer Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster
Jon Krakauer
Jon Krakauer was asked by his editors at Outside Magazine to go on an Everest expedition and report on the growing commercialization and lowering of standards of the climbers but got much more than he expected. I thought this was a very well done and fair account of the entire tragedy. I also learned a lot about high altitude mountain climbing though I still do not really understand the mentality of having to make the summit no matter what the cost. I listened to the audio version which was read by Philip Franklin

Good Reads

Snapshot by Garry Disher SnapshotSnapshot
Garry Disher
A solid third entry in this police procedural series set in Australia. I really like the characters in this series, even supporting players are very well fleshed out. Not a lot of action, just dogged police work, makes the plot seem realistic even when the bodies start to pile up.

Hoodwink (Nameless Detective, #7) by Bill Pronzini Hoodwink
Bill Pronzini
The Nameless Detective is asked by a former pulp fiction writer of mysteries to attend a convention that is taking place in San Fransisco so he can look into a series of extortion notes that some attendees have received that hint at plagiarism. A quick, entertaining private eye read that weaves information about the pulp fiction world into the plot seamlessly.

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms
N.K. Jemisin
I thought the first part of this debut fantasy was really good. The first person narration really pulled me into the story and I soon became engrossed. The middle part though, did bog down a bit for me and I thought there was too much romance but a rousing ending made me want to seek out the next book in the trilogy. I listened to the audio version read by Casaundra Freeman and thought she did a fantastic job.

The Girl in the Green Raincoat by Laura Lippman The Girl in the Green Raincoat
Laura Lippman
I always enjoy reading about Tess and Baltimore so was happy to see this finally published in book form since I had tried reading it when it was originally published on the New York Times website but found the format distracting. There was quite a bit of plot squeezed into 158 pages and I was surprised at how much character development was present too. I felt I really got to know some of the supporting characters in this series much better.

Hell Bent for Leather Confessions of a Heavy Metal Addict by Seb Hunter Hell Bent for Leather: Confessions of a Heavy Metal Addict
Seb Hunter
At a young age the author became obsessed with heavy metal music and this memoir recounts his quest for stardom in a band along with giving a primer on all aspects of metal.

OK Reads

The Yellow Admiral (Aubrey/Maturin Book 18) UNABRIDGED  by Patrick O'Brian The Yellow Admiral (Aubrey/Maturin Book 18) UNABRIDGED
Patrick O'Brian
Not one of the top-tier books in this series. Lots of the action was on land and much of the book consisted of Jack explaining various things to Stephen like the process of enclosing common areas for farming which was not exactly scintillating. While the narration by Simon Vance was OK I really missed Patrick Tull's way with the characters. The ending though made me think that the next book in the series will get back on track.

Death is a Cabaret by Deborah Morgan Death is a Cabaret
Deborah Morgan
An OK mystery set in the world of antiques. It passed the time but I am probably not going to go out of my way to pick up the next in the series. Listened to the audio version which was read by the very bland Reed McColm.

Neither Five Nor Three by Helen MacInnes Neither Five Nor Three
Helen MacInnes
Not one of Helen MacInnes's best works. The premise, the infiltration of communists into various facets of post World War 2 New York City life, held promise but the delivery was so heavy-handed that it became a chore to read.


message 13: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments Alias Reader wrote: "It's interesting how we all have genre's that we can't abide or shy away from. For me that would be science fiction, historical fiction (I rather read a nonfiction account of the topic), magical realism and chick lit. There are probably more, but these came to my mind first.

What genres aren't your thing ? "


I don't read much romance, have not read much chick lit recently, and never really got magical realism.


message 14: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) Sandi wrote: "A."Top Read

Into Thin Air A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest DisasterInto Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster
Jon Krakauer
Jon Krakauer was asked by his editors at Outside Magazine to go on an Everest expedition and report on the growing commercialization and lowering of standards of the climbers but got much more than he expected. I thought this was a very well done and fair account of the entire tragedy. I also learned a lot about high altitude mountain climbing though I still do not really understand the mentality of having to make the summit no matter what the cost. I listened to the audio version which was read by Philip Franklin

-------------------

I've enjoyed all of the Krakauer books I've read. I think I've read them all except his last one on Tillman.


message 15: by NancyInWI (new)

NancyInWI (nanckopf) | 47 comments I read a few more than usual for me as I've been recuperating from extensive foot surgery:

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Gave this a 3/5. It was incredibly boring for the first 200 pages and I probably wouldn't have kept up with it except everyone kept telling me that it got better and I was in no shape to get up and look for a different book in my TBR pile.


Decision Points
2/5 My husband gave this to me for Christmas and he also picked it out of my TBR pile to read. It really plodded and it was tough for me to get through. The military stuff was over my head. Found the AIDS and stem cell research to be interesting.


Eating Mindfully: How to End Mindless Eating and Enjoy a Balanced Relationship with Food
1/5 Actually thought this would give some ideas on how to eat better and diet, but it was disappointing. Lots of quotes from Buddha and more or less "if you are mindful of what you eat, you'll eat right, no need to diet" Eh. Ok. I did like the relaxation techniques suggested.

Dawn's Light
5/5 This was the fourth and last book in the Restoration series by Terri Blackstock. Christian fiction. Good story, but better yet, thought-provoking epilogue by the author.

The Walk
4/5 Quick easy read. Man takes a bad situation with another bad situation piled on top of it and takes off on a walk across Washington...actually, his destination is Florida, so this is apparently the first in a series of books. I think this book could've elaborated more on the experiences along the way and been a longer book.

Saving Ceecee Honeycutt
4/5 Loved this book about a young girl whose crazy mother dies and father sends her to an aunt in Savannah to live. Funny and poignant. Would've given a higher rating but the middle dragged a bit. The author has told me on Twitter that she has another book in the works, but it's not a sequel to this, which I'd really like to see.


message 16: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) I enjoyed reading your reviews Nancy. Hope the foot is doing better.

Even though you didn't care for Eating Mindfully, this sounds like a book I would enjoy. I've read about this Buddhist approach to eating in the magazine Shambhala Sun.
http://www.shambhalasun.com/

To truly eat a meal mindfully is not easy to do. I admit to having the radio or TV on when I eat. But it is something I want to try. Maybe one meal a day.


message 17: by NancyInWI (new)

NancyInWI (nanckopf) | 47 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I enjoyed reading your reviews Nancy. Hope the foot is doing better.

Even though you didn't care for Eating Mindfully, this sounds like a book I would enjoy. I've read about this Buddhist appr..."


I do admit that if I sit and really pat attention to what I'm eating and take my time, that I not only enjoy the meal more, but am more conscious of what and how much I put in my mouth.
Foot is better...starting to put weight on it.


message 18: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments Alias Reader wrote: I've enjoyed all of the Krakauer books I've read. I think I've read them all except his last one on Tillman.

Besides Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster I've also listened to and enjoyed Into the Wild and look forward to reading the book on Pat Tillman. I've heard Tillman's mother on the Dan Patrick radio show and would like to learn more about his story.


message 19: by Lori (new)

Lori (seriousreader) | 11 comments I had a very busy February--my daughter had her cleft palate repaired. Anyway, I only managed to read one book The Forgotten Garden It was a good one though!!


message 20: by Anita (new)

Anita I read three in February. Twenties Girl, which was actually so disappointing but I bought it on Kindle and felt I needed to read it. Skipping a Beat, Not chick lit, but a really interesting look at marriage, and how it changes. Easily Amused, it was just ok, I liked it but not as much as the first I read from McQuestion.


message 21: by Anita (new)

Anita Alias Reader wrote: "It's interesting how we all have genre's that we can't abide or shy away from. For me that would be science fiction, historical fiction (I rather read a nonfiction account of the topic), magical ..."

I don't care for Science Fiction, historical fiction, and I don't know what magical realism is, so I'm guessing I don't read it.

I lean toward literary fiction, some chick lit, some mysteries, memoirs and bios.


message 22: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 81 comments Frankly, I think "magical realism" is a marketing category for writers who are afraid they'll lose either sales or prestige if they admit that they write fantasy or fiction with paranormal content. It seems to me that many books labeled as "magical realism" aren't very different from what Charles De Lint (a favorite of mine) writes and calls "urban fantasy".


message 23: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Shomeret wrote: "It seems to me that many books labeled as "magical realism" aren't very different from what Charles De Lint (a favorite of mine) writes and calls "urban fantasy". ."

Alice Hoffman comes to mind when I think of "magical realism" and most, maybe all, of her books take place in small towns, so "urban fantasy" would not apply to her writing.


message 24: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 09, 2011 09:55PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) For me magical realism would be a book that I've tried to read 3 times. One time I actually read 300 pages before I threw in the towel. As I recall, it was when a flying carpet went by a window.

One Hundred Years of Solitude~Gabriel García Márquez


message 25: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) Lori wrote: "I had a very busy February--my daughter had her cleft palate repaired.

-------------------

I hope all went well, Lori.


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