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ROMAN EMPIRE -THE HISTORY... > 4. HF - THE GRASS CROWN - CHAPTER IV (289 - 382) (02/28/11 - 03/06/11) ~ No spoilers, please

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Hello Everyone,

Welcome to the historical fiction discussion of THE GRASS CROWN
by Colleen McCullough.

This is the reading assignment for week four - (February 28th to March 6th, 2011)

Week 4 – Feb 28-March 6 : Chapter IV, pp. 289 – 382


This is the sixth historical fiction group selected book.

We will open up a thread for each week's reading. Please make sure to post in the particular thread dedicated to those specific chapters and page numbers to avoid spoilers if you are catching up.

This book was kicked off on February 7th.

This discussion is being led by assisting moderator for The Grass Crown - Vicki Cline. This is her first venture in moderating an historical fiction book and she is very excited to be doing this. Please support her in this effort.

We always enjoy the participation of all group members. Amazon, Barnes and Noble and other noted on line booksellers do have copies of the book and shipment can be expedited. The book can also be obtained easily at your local library, but this is not available on Kindle or audible.

This thread opens up Monday, February 28th or the weekend before for discussion. This is a non spoiler thread.

Welcome,

~Bentley


TO ALWAYS SEE ALL WEEKS' THREADS SELECT VIEW ALL

Please feel free to research the complete Table of Contents and Syllabus on this thread:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/4...

The Grass Crown (Masters of Rome, #2) by Colleen McCullough Colleen McCullough Colleen McCullough


message 2: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3833 comments Mod
Marcus Livius Drusus has been elected as a Tribune of the Plebs in order to pass laws that will give Roman citizenship to Italians. He knows that if this doesn’t happen, the Italian communities are preparing for war against Rome and he fears the outcome. He has pledged to always have his proposed laws discussed in the Senate before bringing them before the People, and declares that he doesn’t intend to be a demagogue. He starts slowly with non-controversial laws and works up to the final enfranchisement law. But his opponents, Caepio (his former brother-in-law) and the consul Phillipus, have his laws invalidated because they find that evil omens happened on each day his laws were passed. He’s stunned but continues to work on Italian citizenship and when it looks like he might succeed, he is assassinated in his home.

Sulla is back in Rome and is visited by his former lover Metrobius. On the same day, Sulla’s son falls ill and he remembers that his wife Julilla committed suicide when Metrobius last visited him. His son ultimately dies and Sulla forbids Metrobius to ever see him again. He is also threatened with prosecution for treason connected to his treaty with the Parthians. He pays a visit to the man who brought the charge, obviously an agent of Mithridates, and promises to kill him if he doesn’t desist. The man leaves town post haste.


message 3: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig You actually felt a little sympathy with Sulla when his son died. I expect he will get colder as a person if that is even possible.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Sulla's son is what made him somewhat human. His love for his son was pure and true. Without that hold, I fear what he might become.


message 5: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Bentley wrote: "Sulla's son is what made him somewhat human. His love for his son was pure and true. Without that hold, I fear what he might become."

So true. It could be a emotional trigger that projects Sulla into a much darker state of mind (if it is possible).


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
He is a pretty base person to begin with so we can only imagine. However, had his son lived; he may have strived to be a better person because his son idolized him.


message 7: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3833 comments Mod
Unfortunately, his love for his son didn't prevent his being beastly to his daughter. Still, the son might have had a good influence.


message 8: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Good point, Vicki, and as Bentley said, we have a low starting point with him ethically.


message 9: by Vicki, Assisting Moderator - Ancient Roman History (new)

Vicki Cline | 3833 comments Mod
The person I feel the worst about is Drusus. He had the correct solution to the Italian problem and he went about his legislation in the proper manner, but his opponents just couldn't allow it to happen. They'll be sorry.


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
Very true Vicki. It is a shame that an honorable man who does the honorable thing can be struck down by his opponents who are dishonorable as well as ruthless. And you can say that again..they will be sorry.


message 11: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig You got that right; nothing but down for the opponents and for Rome.

This Italian citizenship reminds me a little like our immigration issue today. It is emotionally charged. In 2005, Senators McCain and Kennedy talked about having more immigrants start the citizen process, while critics charged it was amnesty. Obviously, it did end in assassination, but I couldn't help but think about it as I was reading this section.


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44200 comments Mod
True Bryan; it does make one pause.


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