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message 1: by Mariel (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) I want more stories like in Winesburg, Ohio.

I want to feel like I know people like in that book. Stories like glimpses into people's lives like you know how they feel and they would probably know how you feel. And the weight isn't too much.

I pretty much want more books like Winesburg.


message 2: by Dave (last edited Feb 26, 2011 04:00PM) (new)

Dave Russell You might, if you haven't already (I'm too lazy too look (but not too lazy to type that I'm too lazy,)) try The Long Valley by John Steinbeck. He, like a lot of his contemporaries, was influenced by Anderson. He has a similar approach and feel.


message 3: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine | 455 comments hey so I have read a lot of short stories and I'd like to help, but I've never read winesburg, ohio so is there anything else you could say about it. How in depth are the stories? are stories that are a bit creepy okay?

I'm going to recommend The Littlest Hitler - Stories without any answers because I think it is the best short story book I've ever read, but it is probably weirder than the classics. An example in he title story a little boy dresses up as hitler for Halloween and the story goes through what happens to him


message 4: by karen, future RA queen (new)

karen (karenbrissette) | 1315 comments Mod
it is true that the littlest hitler is a good short story collection, but it is not a good match for sherwood anderson. steinbeck is similar - frustrated and marginalized characters, desperate to make their lives have meaning etc... i would trust dave on this one - i have never read any short stories by steinbeck, but the wayward bus and cannery row are very winesburg-y

and this is probably no real surprise, coming from me, but thomas hardy sure does write a good short story. Penguin Great Loves Mere Interlude. this collection has three little stories in it, and they all have nice gut-wrenching human vulnerability-and-struggle in them, but i love most of his stories. they have similar bleak-but-striving tones to anderson.


message 5: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine | 455 comments but it is sooooo good karen.

if karen says its not the same it's probably not.


message 6: by karen, future RA queen (new)

karen (karenbrissette) | 1315 comments Mod
yeah, but readers' advisory work is like food. i really wanted butterscotch rice pudding for valentines day. and sean went out to get me some, only they didn't have butterscotch. so he got me raspberry/blueberry. and it was awesome, and i ate every last bite of it, but the whole time, i was thinking about butterscotch and how i had had a taste for it, you know?? and even though it was rally good pudding, it wasn't what i wanted at that moment.


message 7: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine | 455 comments karen wrote: "yeah, but readers' advisory work is like food. i really wanted butterscotch rice pudding for valentines day. and sean went out to get me some, only they didn't have butterscotch. so he got me raspb..."

maybe Ryan Boudinot will be the right kind of pudding some other time


message 8: by Christy (new)

Christy (christymtidwell) | 149 comments I have also not read Winesburg, Ohio (which I feel like must make me a bad American literature teacher/student in some way, but oh well), so maybe these aren't quite what you're looking for, but have you read or considered reading You Know When the Men Are Gone by Siobhan Fallon, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie, or Grand Avenue: A Novel in Stories by Greg Sarris?

Siobhan Fallon's stories examine the lives of people living and working on Fort Hood, a military base in Texas. They are kind of linked as they are all about the same community. She looks at how the military life affects families and relationships. It certainly gave me a much better understanding of what that life is like and of what it feels like to go through the separations involved and to see your loved ones changing in ways you can't fully understand during those separations.

It's been a while since I've read the Sherman Alexie and Greg Sarris books, but Sherman Alexie is just generally pretty great and Lone Ranger and Tonto might work for your request that the weight isn't too much. There's definitely serious material here but it can be lightened a bit by Alexie's humor and skill with language.

And Greg Sarris's book I remember even less well, but here's a bit from my review of it: "both books [Alexie's and Sarris's] are novels-in-stories set on the reservation, in which the stories are told from various characters' perspectives and storytelling itself is a central theme of the text. However, where Alexie's book plays with perspective, realism, the impact of the stories, and much larger themes, Sarris's book remains fairly straightforward. Sarris tells the story of this community in a series of first person stories (with a couple of notable exceptions) in which it is always quickly clear who is telling the story and, thanks to the genealogy he provides at the beginning of the book, how this narrator is related to the other narrators of the book. Each story could stand on its own but also enhances the others that have come before and that will follow in the collection. Ultimately, Sarris's novel-in-stories is a really excellent exploration of a particular community and its members in traditional short story format."

Hope this helps! And someday I will actually read Winesburg, Ohio.


message 9: by Mariel (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) Thank you everyone! I have added all to my to-read (I had The Littlest Hitler on there already. It does look good) list.

I love Thomas Hardy so much so I think I'll start with that and the Tonto Fistfight book that Christy suggested.


message 10: by Mariel (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) I read Mere Interlude by Thomas Hardy and I loved it. Karen was right-on about the quality of living in the cage (life, other people, lost hopes, unrequited not just love but of just being) that Winesburg had. The feeling of solace because of recognition and understanding (like faith) of what the hell it is all about.

Thank you so much, Karen.

I'm going to read the Tonto book next and I'll be back to report.

Ra success!


message 11: by karen, future RA queen (new)

karen (karenbrissette) | 1315 comments Mod
huzzah!!


message 12: by Mariel (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) If you can get Kinga to admit it there is a third success story for ra.


message 13: by karen, future RA queen (new)

karen (karenbrissette) | 1315 comments Mod
is she being shy??


message 14: by Mariel (last edited Feb 28, 2011 02:41PM) (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) She lost her whole saturday to reading a romance novel I recommended in her thread.


message 15: by Mariel (new)

Mariel (fuchsiagroan) Okay, I also read The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven on Christy's recommendation.

I liked these stories a whole lot. The pathos and cage were there. The will to keep on keepin' on. It's early and I suck at describing feels. I know this is ra and I'm supposed to be better at this.

I think I'm becoming a short story fan when they are really connected like this was. Feeling community is something I don't feel much in my life. It resonated with me the idea of imagination, and possession of people in our lives, history and culture precisely because I do feel lost.

Great pick, Christy!


message 16: by karen, future RA queen (new)

karen (karenbrissette) | 1315 comments Mod
did you end up reading any others from these suggestions?


message 17: by Lisa (new)

Lisa | 24 comments I read You Know When the Men Are Gone and thought it was pretty good, even though I generally prefer novels.


message 18: by Peter (new)

Peter (peteepie) | 64 comments i'd never heard of winesburg, ohio, but now i want to read it. two suggestions from australia which might fit your criteria but may be hard to come by..."the turning" by tim winton is a series of short stories set in a west australian town which ultimately tie together. and paul kelly's "how to make gravy" is written in the "glimpsing" manner you're after; it is not fiction, but it IS fabulous


message 19: by Eric (new)

Eric Rupert (emichaelrupert) | 2 comments Mars wrote: "I want more stories like in Winesburg, Ohio.

I want to feel like I know people like in that book. Stories like glimpses into people's lives like you know how they feel and they would probably know..."


I'm going to go out on a limb here, a Caribbean limb. I've taught V. S. Naipauls's Miguel Street a few times, and many of my college students with a good sense of humor found it an unexpected find. It contains stories using a common backdrop, interwoven, and well written. It's brief like Winesburg, but it has a few dialect challenges, not too difficult to overcome, however. I'd even recommend it for high school reading. Cheers.


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