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GROUP READS > Outlander discussion - will contain spoilers

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message 1: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 15713 comments Mod
This thread will open on March 1.

If you choose to read Outlander for the Group Reads task (or another task for that matter) please feel free to discuss it here.


message 2: by Sheila (new)

Sheila (sheilaj) | 2244 comments Ok, I was totally fooled by this one. I had seen this book mentioned in a lot of different places and for some reason thought it was a scifi/space kind of book. Evidently I was confusing it with the movie Outland with Sean Connery (my personal favorite Connery flick). I was totally surprised by its Scotland 1700's theme. This reminded me a lot of The Circle Trilogy by Nora Roberts which I still haven't finished. I liked this book and plan on reading the next in the series.


message 3: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary | 640 comments I mostly enjoyed this book but I found Claire, the heroine, extremely irritating. There was a point in the middle where I wondered if I should just stop and read one of the other group reads instead. But the plot picked up again with the witch trial and I didn't have any trouble staying interested after that. Just wish I could have liked Claire ...


message 4: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 148 comments I have been meaning to read this book for years because so many friends of mine recommended it. I have to admit that I had a little trouble getting into it but I felt it picked up later in the book and I was drawn more into the story. Though I wasn't blown away by the book I probably will read more in the series.


message 5: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 15713 comments Mod
Finally finished - it was okay, but it didn't blow me away by any means. I thought it could have had 2 or 3 hundred pages cut without any great loss, LOL!

One thing that I found interesting - although the author seemed to take great care with details about herbs and such (although I certainly didn't research to see if it was accurate), she seemed to forget that her heroine was supposed to be British. Why would she repeatedly refer to "Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ"? I wouldn't think that would be a common phrase in England in 1945.


message 6: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 148 comments Sandy wrote: Why would she repeatedly refer to "Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ"? I wouldn't think that would be a common phrase in England in 1945.

I noticed that too but she does talk about nursing many Yank soldiers so I just attributed it to that. Maybe it was something she heard from the American soldiers a lot.


message 7: by Sandy (last edited Mar 11, 2011 05:25PM) (new)

Sandy | 15713 comments Mod
Kathleen wrote: "Sandy wrote: Why would she repeatedly refer to "Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ"? I wouldn't think that would be a common phrase in England in 1945.

I noticed that too but she does talk about nursing m..."


That could be - I thought that it might just be because the author is American, so was maybe paying more attention to the time period than to the country. Like using John Wayne for her ideal hero - that was still relatively early on in his career, before he was such a total icon.


message 8: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 7546 comments IIRC (and i'm not counting this book for the challenge because i've read it soo many times, it didn't seem fair) - there was one guy she was nursing at a field hospital who said it and it just stuck that she kept using it...it was some american army sgt maj or something like that i think


Sandy wrote: "Finally finished - it was okay, but it didn't blow me away by any means. I thought it could have had 2 or 3 hundred pages cut without any great loss, LOL!

One thing that I found interesting -..."



message 9: by Rosemary (last edited Mar 12, 2011 03:49PM) (new)

Rosemary | 640 comments I thought all of Claire's swearing was extremely unlikely for a woman at that time - whether British or American. It's one of the things that irritated me about her.

There were a couple of other Americanisms. E.g. Claire's husband's colleagues at Oxford University were referred to as "faculty" at one point. But by and large, I thought Diana Gabaldon (or her editors) did very well with the British English.


message 10: by SandyC (new)

SandyC (sandyc88) | 420 comments My British grandmother, who was in her late teens/early 20s in the 1940s, swears like a sailor! Claire spent a lot of time with soldiers as a war nurse, so her swearing was perfectly realistic to me.

I didn't really appreciate Outlander until I read further into the series. The author really pulled me into the saga and I felt like the characters were part of my family.


message 11: by Carrie (new)

Carrie (overdrivejunkee) Great book for those of us who can't stand romances unless there is an actual interesting story woven into it. Touches on some of how life was in the 1700's because the main character is accidentally sent back in time 200 years and has to survive. Sounds hokey when you hear the time traveling part but the story is written very well and the time travel part is integrated with folk lore of Scotland as well as some historical background that makes it intriguing. The characters are well developed. For those of you who like the romance part, there is a seductive love scene that really makes you hot under the collar!
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message 12: by Rach (new)

Rach (rachlovestv) | 263 comments I've been meaning to read this book for a while now, as everything I'd heard about it seemed right up my alley - time travel, historical fiction, etc. One of my good friends adores this whole series, and she's been bugging me to read it for years! On the whole, I enjoyed it. There was much less time travel than I expected - whenever that term is mentioned, I imagine more of a sci-fi feel, but to be honest, this was more pure historical fiction. It just so happens one of the characters is from a different time, thus providing a lot of great fish-out-of-water hilarity.

I have to admit, there were more sex scenes in this book than I anticipated. Obviously when a book is in the "romance" genre, it's to be expected, but at one point, it seemed like there was one every 10 pages or so! I personally didn't feel that they were all necessary, but at least they didn't detract from the book as a whole.

The part that made me most uncomfortable was Jaime's torture and rape near the end. The fact that the physical and mental torture was all wrapped up together seemed to make it even worse, and I honestly don't know how he could have recovered after that, even with Claire's help. Reading what he went through really made me feel sick to my stomach.


message 13: by Kim (new)

Kim (goodreadscomkimber) | 731 comments Here's another book I would never have read were it not for SRC! I didn't know I had so much of a fascination with historical ficton romances, but apparantly I do! I am HOOKED!
Thus far in the challenge, it appears that I may be in the minority here but - I loved this book!!! I couldn't tear myself away from it for anything. I listened to it on audiobook (almost day AND night for three days!).
I've requested Dragonflies in Amber from my library and can't wait to pick it up and get back to this lovely, intriguing story!
Thanks to those who suggested and voted for Outlander!


message 14: by SandyC (new)

SandyC (sandyc88) | 420 comments Kim wrote: "Here's another book I would never have read were it not for SRC! I didn't know I had so much of a fascination with historical ficton romances, but apparantly I do! I am HOOKED!
Thus far in the..."


Kim, now you can join other Outlander addicts on this discussion thread (beware of spoilers, though!).

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/9...


message 15: by Kim (new)

Kim (goodreadscomkimber) | 731 comments Sandy wrote: "Kim wrote: "Here's another book I would never have read were it not for SRC! I didn't know I had so much of a fascination with historical ficton romances, but apparantly I do! I am HOOKED!
Thus..."


Thanks Sandy! I'll check it out. Everyone here at SRC is so awesome, I'd never find anything good if you weren't so willing to post great info here!


message 16: by Foxy Grandma (new)

Foxy Grandma (foxygrandma) | 997 comments I am not reading this for the group read, because I just recently read through the entire series again for the second time. I love this series and have recommended it to several people.

I even got my dad reading them before he passed away. He loved history, was very into our Scottish Heritage, and since we live in NC (which the later books are set in), they held a special interest for him. After the first couple books came out, he would buy the next book first, then let me read it when he was through. He would impatiently wait for me to finish it so we could talk about it. Unfortunately, he passed away right after A Breath of Snow and Ashes came out. He bought it, but never got to read it. I could not bring myself to read that book for 2 years, because he hadn't read it yet. So they now hold a very special place in my heart.


message 17: by Tami (new)

Tami P | 240 comments I have read this one before but loved it enough to re-read. I have Lord John and the Private Matter also to fit into this Spring Challenge somewhere. Love the series!


message 18: by Elizabeth (NC) (new)

Elizabeth (NC) | 185 comments I'm currently listening to An Echo in the Bone--it's taking me forever since I don't listen while my daughter is in the car and I've realized, I'm not in the car too much without her. Not to mention it is 40 discs!!
I've enjoyed this series a lot. I thought about rereading Outlander for this challenge, but then I knew that I would have to reread them all and I'm not ready to make that type of time commitment right now.
So, Kim, you're not alone--you're just a little late to the party! :)


message 19: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (jess0702) | 135 comments I just finished this one, and I'm definitely glad that I read it. Overall I liked the book and will probably pick up the rest of the series (especially as my local Borders is on its way out and they are likely to be cheap). I continually found myself up way too late on weeknights reading it without realizing just how long I had been reading for, and I was glad for it's length since I didn't want the story to end! That said, I think I like it best because I didn't really overanalyze it while reading-I like a good romance with a solid plot, even if I felt like I didn't always buy the character thoughts and motivations.


message 20: by Stesse (new)

Stesse | 271 comments This was my second time through this book, and it only got better. Can't wait to continue through the series again - and REALLY can't wait for the next one to be released!


message 21: by Sera (new)

Sera I recently finished the book and I enjoyed it. However, I found the story to be a bit campy at times and over the top in others. I liked the characters and the overall storyline. I will likely read more in this series but not in the immediate future, as I've heard that the future books are repetitive to some extent.


message 22: by Iamthez (new)

Iamthez | 54 comments This is a fantastic series, and I always find myself excited to read it again after a few years. Any excuse to pull the book out of the library!

One thing that does bother me is the amount of sex scenes at times, when really, it does nothing for the plot but add...well, sex. But then again, I get annoyed with random sex in movies too.

A plus - as someone that does not know much about history, let alone United Kingdom history, I find that the books do a really good job of explaining everything, without making it seem like a history lecture. Making Claire from 'present time' was brilliant, I think, and I like how time continues even while she's gone.

I'll have to find a way to fit the other books into the challenge now! It's like a Lays chip - you can't stop at one!


message 23: by Lindsay (new)

Lindsay (ljones08) | 21 comments I am in the minority I realize but I did NOT enjoy this book.. I struggled through it and wished I hadn't wasted my time. It took me a long time to read and I should have gave up 50 pages in. But I was reading it for the challenge and wanted to finish.


message 24: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) | 7546 comments I remember reading an interview with Diana a few years ago...it wasn't supposed to be a time travel, but when she originally wrote Claire she realized that a woman in that time wouldn't act as she would, but a more modern woman...so that was where the time travel came from


message 25: by Coralie (new)

Coralie | 2053 comments That probably explains the feeling of wrongness I felt when I attempted to read it some years ago.


message 26: by Isabell (new)

Isabell (purzel) | 247 comments I just finished it after taking some time and reading other books in-between. Considering I had enough time for reading at my hand, that says a lot. I wasn't really hooked by the story, but I finished it, so it was well enough.

I might pick up the other books of the series at some point, when they are available at the library, but it's not as though I was really impatient to get on with the story. Just mildly curious.


message 27: by Patricia (last edited May 25, 2011 06:02PM) (new)

Patricia | 683 comments I should preface by saying that historical romances are not my normal choice of genre. I finally finished Outlander (which in my estimation was much longer than necessary) and was not impressed. It was just okay for me. While it was interesting to get a glimpse into 1700's Scotland, the storyline left me feeling "enough all ready!" and I wasn't enraptured by any of the characters. Being that there are 6 more books in the series and all about as long as this one, I cannot see motivating to continue reading them.


message 28: by Jayalalita (new)

Jayalalita devi dasi (lonelylorelei) | 87 comments I am a horrid, horrid person, because my favorite character in this book was the villain, and he was quite a villain, which is why I liked him so much. I love a smooth, sadistic, well-groomed, unrepentantly evil English officer. Take a wee dram of erectile disfunction, mix in a heavy jigger of homoerotic cruelty, garnish with a dash of incest and you've just made the perverted villain cocktail of my dreams. I was downright heartbroken when he was trampled by a mess o' cattle, because I was all agog for his being about to cause trouble in later novels of the series. Oh well. And bother, they killed the witch from the future, too. Hmmph. I will continue to read the series though, even if the two stars of the show are a bit goodie-goodie, just because I want to see what happens with Claire and her abandoned husband, now that she's been all traumatized by his doppelganger. Yum.


message 29: by JC (new)

JC (jmnc) | 640 comments Jayalalita wrote: "I am a horrid, horrid person, because my favorite character in this book was the villain, and he was quite a villain, which is why I liked him so much. I love a smooth, sadistic, well-groomed, unre..."

Oh, you MUST read on! *must not reveal spoilers*must not reveal spoilers*must not reveal spoilers*


message 30: by Sue (new)

Sue (suetinge) | 1495 comments This was a re-read for me, and I'd forgotten quite a few things. I think I blocked out the whole rape/torture scene. I also had forgotten about all the sex scenes, which don't bother me, because of how much I liked the book overall.


message 31: by RedSycamore (new)

RedSycamore | 95 comments Wow, just finished this today (haha, right under the wire, as usual). I liked it much more than I thought I would considering that I usually avoid the romance genre like the plague. The book definitely could have been trimmed by a couple hundred pages, but I was pleasantly surprised to find that Gabaldon is actually a very decent writer. I'm looking forward to reading more of this series!

My main gripe was that the relationship between Claire and Jamie seemed a little strange to me sometimes, but I think that was mainly because Claire occasionally got on my nerves. Couldn't agree more with Carrie about the Scottish/fairytale aspects of the time travel being a particularly nice touch, though that aspect of the book was spoiled a bit for me at the end when Claire starts agonizing about 'changing the past'... Gabaldon was smart, though, to realize that a modern perspective would add a lot of freshness to a story that could easily get bogged down in the historical details.


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