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Rants / Debates (Serious) > America's regions---Why can't we all just bloody well get along?

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message 1: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments Ok, I was reading about that whole thing with some crazyass motherfucker saying miscarriages would be illegal in Georgia, and I was reminded that sometimes the south seems like another country. Not all the south, don't beat me up, Heiders, you know I love you, but some elements of the south. I don't know if this is one of those stereotypes, like Wisconsin and beer and cheese and fat people or whatever, or if the Bible Belt is really a different culture and place entirely. Is the south really that much more conservative? How does that manifest itself in daily life? Is this true in all areas of the south, outside of Austin and New Orleans or whatever? Is this an urban thing? Rural? I've driven through the south but not stopped much so I'm coming from a place of ignorance and trying to understand. Comments?


message 2: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments I'm not familiar with that miscarriage reference. More info?


message 3: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24073 comments Mod
Scout wrote: "I'm not familiar with that miscarriage reference. More info?"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelook...

Georgia lawmaker proposes classifying miscarriages as ‘prenatal murder’


message 4: by Lori (new)

Lori I too haven't lived in the south but many of my friends do, and yes, it is extremely different. I'm talking about the deep south - Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, etc. It seems to be the most different from any other part of the US. Roots of the confederacy.

I don't consider Arkansas, Nevada, AZ, Texas, even Oklahoma to be part of that south, altho Oklahoma is closer. More of an old time western frontier mentality.


message 5: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments Oh, no. This gives me a sinking feeling. I've lived in Georgia all my life, and I can tell you that no one I know agrees with such bullshit.


message 6: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments I don't know if it's regional or an urban vs. rural divide, but it really bothers me that there is a large anti-intellectual contingent in this country.

"That thar ed-ewe-mah-kay-shun ain't no good fer ya, dammit!"


message 7: by Lori (last edited Feb 26, 2011 08:58AM) (new)

Lori I really get shocked every time I'm reminded that's where you live, too. And yet, through the years I've met some very awesome people from Utah. Of course they all complain about the state, and they all feel like they're the only ones. If only you could find each other and start a bar, like Cheers!

Scout wrote: "Oh, no. This gives me a sinking feeling. I've lived in Georgia all my life, and I can tell you that no one I know agrees with such bullshit."

Do you mean the new proposed bill? If you do, that's good news. My ex-baby sitter was in Atlanta for college, and she said that all her new friends, while still maintaining their parents' opinions when in their presence, were definitely different and far more more open to other viewpoints.


message 8: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments Yes, of course, I mean the proposed bill, Lori.

I've thought about how to express how it feels to be stereotyped by where I live (in the South). I think it feels the same as being stereotyped by race or religion or sex or economic status. Really crappy.
And what's up with the title of this thread - south vs. north. I thought we were over that kind of thinking.


message 9: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments BunWat wrote: "I get the impression you see a lot of that in Utah, Phil."

Exactly. As a degree holding Liberal Elite in a sea of red political fury, hearing and seeing evidence of this attitude is quite nearly a daily event.


message 10: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments Lori wrote: "If only you could find each other and start a bar, like Cheers!"

That would be so cool! I'd like to sit around the corner to Norm's left and shoot a little trivia with Cliff. I want the "Cheers" where Coach is still alive, though.


message 11: by Suefly (new)

Suefly | 620 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Scout wrote: "I'm not familiar with that miscarriage reference. More info?"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelook......"




Are you kidding me? There are no words for that level of ignorance.


Lyzzibug ~Still Breathing~ (lyzzibug) | 708 comments This just enforces my thinking that some people just need to be shot. That is a horrible mentality to have. Miscarriages are horrible, and sometimes just unexplainable.


message 13: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments There is a difference between the rural south and the urban south. When I lived in Alabama I lived among the poor because that's what I was: poor. We were all kind to each other. When I lived in the south, tent revivals were still a big social event. The hardest think I had to get used to in the south was how SLOW everyone moved. You move that slow in the north and people either run you over or you freeze to death in the winter.


message 14: by Gus (new)

Gus Sanchez (gussanchez) I think it's an exaggeration that the South is a breeding ground for crazy. To me, having lived in the South for more than 10 years, I find many Southerners to be extremely friendly and personable, regardless of their rural/urban, religious, or political status.

With that being said, there are plenty of bat-shit crazy people that hail from the South, and they tend to get more attention than normal, decent Southerners.


message 15: by Félix (new)

Félix (habitseven) I grew up in the north, then went to college in South Carolina. I had been immersed in southern culture throughout my life (Arkansas family origins) -- so it wasn't as much of a shock as it was for other northerners who came there. As a Yankee, I was among those who were subject to a significant amount of derision and dislike (sometimes hate). But I made it through okay.

In later years, I've made many lasting friendships with southerners. I worked for a small consulting firm based in Atlanta for a while -- and am still close with many from that company.


message 16: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments I have to say many of my favorite gigs ever have been in the south. Cities like Boston and New York are so full of singer-songwriters that nobody notices or cares if you come to town. Play a small southern city and half the town will come out, buy your CD, buy you drinks and dinner, and invite you to grandma's for a southern breakfast spread the next morning.


message 17: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments I liked living in the south. I spent many months in northern alabama and 5 years in various cities in Virginia. My faborite: Athens, AL.


message 18: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments One thing about Southern usage that some might not know is that y'all is always plural. You'd never meet a friend on the street and say, "Hi, y'all."

A friend from Oklahoma would crack up when I'd say things like, "Can you carry me over to Mama's house?" or "Crank up the car." Pretty funny visual images, I admit.


message 19: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24073 comments Mod
A friend from Oklahoma would crack up when I'd say things like, "Can you carry me over to Mama's house?"

And they'd say, "Sure, hop on my back"?

I often hear members of Chicago's black community say "I stay at...." when white people would say "I live at..." Is this just a Chicago thing? "I stay at 88th and Marquette."


message 20: by Brittomart (new)

Brittomart "Where you stay?" is a common question I hear. And I've heard white and black people ask that question. And I've heard white people say "I stay at" too.


Lyzzibug ~Still Breathing~ (lyzzibug) | 708 comments *thinking* I don't believe I've used "I live at..." I always say "I stay at..."

Do you also say to higher or lower the volume?


message 22: by Brittomart (new)

Brittomart "turn it up/down"


message 23: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments BunWat wrote: "Here RA, interesting article about the south. Warning, its long. But it is thoughtful and interesting.

http://www.garreau.com/main.cfm?actio..."


Thanks, Buns! I'll check it out.


message 24: by Arminius (last edited Mar 07, 2011 04:40PM) (new)

Arminius | 1037 comments I know not every one from the South likes Nascar but the ones I know have an unrealistic passion for it.


message 25: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments When I finally refused to spend my weekends watching NASCAR and WWF wrestling at his brother's house, my former husband told me I was a snob. So, you're right. Not everyone in the South likes NASCAR, but some do. This is a good place to live. Grits, watermelon, collard greens, peaches, boiled peanuts - live oaks, beaches, eccentric characters, great stories - I'll take that.


message 26: by Mary (new)

Mary (madamefifi) "A Utah state legislator (Chris Buttars, the laughingstock of all thinking people) has advanced a resolution to take control of schools away from the Utah State School Board and give it to the legislature.

Why?

Because state education leaders are "advocating for contraception, socialism and other values contrary to those of the state."

YOU FUCKING ASS-HAT."



This was posted last month in the WTF thread. "Southern" doesn't have anything to do with "batshit crazy". Just sayin'.


message 27: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments Many Utahns consider themselves part of the south.

The area where I live is called "Utah's Dixie."

Just sayin'.


message 28: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24073 comments Mod
There's batshit crazy all over the U.S. Remember when Karl Rove described the midsection of Pennsylvania as basically "Alabama"?


message 29: by Mary (new)

Mary (madamefifi) Phil wrote: "Many Utahns consider themselves part of the south."

That is batshit crazy. Utah wasn't even a state til 1896.

Lobstergirl wrote: "There's batshit crazy all over the U.S. Remember when Karl Rove described the midsection of Pennsylvania as basically "Alabama"?"

WTF??


message 30: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24073 comments Mod
Yes. Philadelphia in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, Alabama in the middle.


message 31: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments Mary posted:

"Southern" doesn't have anything to do with "batshit crazy". Just sayin'.

I'll second that, Mary.


message 32: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments So big city gals are more progressive (I'm reading that as open-minded) than rural gals, Bun? Hold your stereotyping horses!


message 33: by Phoenix (last edited Mar 08, 2011 06:00AM) (new)

Phoenix (phoenixapb) | 1619 comments Alright, I've avoided this topic long enough. I've lived in the north, south, east, and west, and you find all kinds in all places. I just like to bitch about the south because they pick on my yankeeness. However, I've found that the less diverse and smaller the community, the more conservative they tend to be. I figure it's because people with those kinds of "ideals" (I use that term very loosely) tend to want to be in smaller, close knit communities, with like minded people.

Sadly, I know people who would support a bill that would punish people for something as impossible to prevent as a miscarriage. I think proposed laws/bills like this are asinine in the extreme.


message 34: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3385 comments "its just the truth" "close nit"


message 35: by Michele (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments I loved living in the south. the food was great. the weather was great and it made me grow as a person. The beaches in Virginia were a revelation: warm water! I loved California too, even Las Vegas (now their summers are hot!). But my favorite was and still is San Francisco.


message 36: by Phoenix (new)

Phoenix (phoenixapb) | 1619 comments Thanks, Scout :D


message 37: by Dorina (new)

Dorina Stanciu (cinderelle) | 2 comments Michele wrote: "I loved living in the south. the food was great. the weather was great and it made me grow as a person. The beaches in Virginia were a revelation: warm water! I loved California too, even Las Vegas..."

Hi Michele,
I'm totally with you! We(my husband and I) lived in California, Palm Springs, then San Francisco Bay area...wonderful climate, wonderful people. Now we live in Virginia. I like it here too...but not as much as in San Francisco! I really miss California and all my friends there...Virginia Beach is beautiful...but if you prefer something more picturesque then you have to take a drive on I1 wich follows the Pacific Ocean border, see places like Half Moon Bay...etc, of course in California!Yes, from all the places I've been in USA, San Francisco is still my favorite...


message 38: by RandomAnthony (new)

RandomAnthony | 14536 comments I know you want to show your boobies for some beads right about now.

I'll try this in the cafeteria today and see what happens.

What's a zulu coconut?


message 39: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments dorina wrote: ".but if you prefer something more picturesque then you have to take a drive on I1 wich follows the Pacific Ocean border, see places like Half Moon Bay."

They have a really nice brew pub in Half Moon Bay.


message 40: by Dorina (new)

Dorina Stanciu (cinderelle) | 2 comments Jim wrote: "dorina wrote: ".but if you prefer something more picturesque then you have to take a drive on I1 wich follows the Pacific Ocean border, see places like Half Moon Bay."

They have a really nice brew..."


Yes, we drove by it many times. Never been inside though. They advertised wine tasting every once in a while.


message 41: by Jim (new)

Jim | 6485 comments I have yet to drive by it, but I've only been there once.


message 42: by Lori (new)

Lori (barfield) | 53 comments Hi y'all! I was born & raised in North Carolina. I've only been to Florida, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, & South Carolina. And i don't mind saying "I like calling North Carolina home." Whenever i moved or just visited another state i couldn't wait to get back home. We are not all backward, hillbilly, stereotype, southerners. Do we like outsiders telling us what we should like, what to wear, how to talk, what to believe? Well no. Does anyone anywhere like to be told anything, no matter where they live? Again no. I think one of the reasons some Yankees or Northerners if you prefer, have a beef with some of us is, IMO & my encounters, is that some of them come here with a bias about us already & turn their nose up at our speech, our beliefs, and our way of life. They make fun and act like their better then us just because they were born in New York or Maine. I personally don't care where anyone's from, i treat people like they treat me.

As for this dipshit in Georgia, maybe some of the real rednecks can get together & beat him down!!!

One more thing, we reserve the right to call a redneck a redneck, but we tend to get our nose out of joint if a Yankee does it. Hell i get mine twisted when my brother calls me one. He's one so he thinks i should be. LOL

Hope i didn't offend anyone, that wasn't my intent.One of my best friends live in Lake George New York.


message 43: by Michele (last edited Mar 09, 2011 05:04AM) (new)

Michele bookloverforever (lovebooks14) | 1970 comments my son was 2 when we moved to the south, by the time we moved back to new england he was 7 and spoke with a drawl and all the children made fun of his accent. He did eventuallly drop the drawl but every once and awhile with certain words and phrases you can still hear a trace of it. This was in the 70's and NH was still very,very white (very few other races)at the time, so it was good for him to learn there was more to America than people of european descent. He learned that the color of one's skin did not really matter very much.


message 44: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments BunWat wrote: "I did giggle a little bit at the "one of my best friends is a Yankee," comment. There is definitely some yankee dixie tension still very much alive."

I suppose sometimes, to remain sane, one must laugh at ignorance.


message 45: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments Doesn't "bless her heart" mean something like, "what a stupid fucking bitch?"


message 46: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments Phil wrote: "Doesn't "bless her heart" mean something like, "what a stupid fucking bitch?""

It can be sincere, Phil... sometimes it means what is said. Sometimes it does mean something to the effect of "What a stupid fucking bitch," and sometimes it means "Oh, I'd make fun of you if it didn't seem like I was picking on the handicap kid"... It's all in the delivery.


message 47: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11605 comments :)


message 48: by Arminius (new)

Arminius | 1037 comments Yes, but doesn't British accents make them sound smarter? I also remember some poll that said New England accents made New Englanders sound smarter.


message 49: by Lori (new)

Lori (barfield) | 53 comments Very well said BunWat.

Now there is one thing we all have in common. North, South, East, or West when another country fucks with one, they fuck with all. I've never been to New York city, and really don't have plans to go, but when the Towers fell, we all felt it. I never heard so many "good old boys" talk about what they wanted to do to those responsible. If we had it our way sand land would be leveled & our troops would be home protecting us.

So no matter where you live remember we are all AMERICANS!!! Lets try our best to be considerate of other peoples ways, speech, race, religion, and anything else we think of as being different from where we grew up.

Again not trying to offend, hope i didn't.


message 50: by Heidi (new)

Heidi (heidihooo) | 10825 comments I think what you're trying to say is that accents can affect a person's credibility - that's absolutely true. Notice - you won't see very many reporters or news anchors with a strong dialect in the large markets. That's because they're trained to speak with a midwestern dialect... the good ones are. The ones who don't or won't... they don't usually leave their region or small markets. Regionalized dialects lose credibility with their audience.


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