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Fame and Fave Females > Interesting Art Articles about lesser known Female Artists

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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Aleta Pippin may not be the most famous artist...yet. But reading about her style and technique in the magazine, American Art Collector, sort of reminds me of the topic we are discussing in our current book readL Tom and Jack. I may be way off, but I do appreciate her colors and relate them to the type of color scale used by Percyval Tudor-Hart. pg. 91 "He was particularly obsessed with the most unruly element in painting, color,and sought to somehow control it by applying principles drawn from the most disciplined, mathematical and most abstract of art forms, classical music."

This is what Aleta Pippin says:
Color and Music

"My paintings are about experimentation and process"..."I delight in the layering technique used when painting in oil; thin glazes of color upon thin glazes of color--always with the goal of visual depth and texture, energetic, warm vibrant color."


By the Stream

"Color and music are infused in the work, along with mu desire that the viewer be moved by the beauty" elaborated Pippin, "My goal is to create artwork that is filled with joy and beauty: the purpose of which is to uplift the spirit of each viewer and evoke an acknowledgment of the amazing possibilities our future holds."


Against the Shore


Romantic Walk


message 2: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Thanks Heather. These are quite good, I think. I suspect I'd get even more out of seeing the actual paint surface.


message 3: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Here is the website from where I obtained some of her paintings. Maybe you can find more information.

http://www.howellgallery.com/pippin.html


message 4: by Ed (last edited Apr 28, 2011 04:58PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments "Celebrated Jackson textile artist Gwendolyn Magee, who turned a traditional art form into profound contemporary art, died Wednesday night following an illness.

Magee, 67, who was honored for artistic achievement with a 2011 Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts this past February, was renowned for her works centered around African American life and history...."

"...The Smithsonian Institution, the Mississippi Museum of Art and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African-American History are among the institutions that have collected and/or exhibited her works.
... Magee was working on a quilt about the Freedom Riders for a Montgomery museum at the time of her death — a selected work that she was feverishly working on but didn’t finish, Daily and longtime friend Geraldine Brookins said."


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message 5: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Thanks,Ed! I haven't heard of her. She sounds like a great artist and person. Thanks for introducing her and paying homage.


message 6: by Ed (last edited Apr 29, 2011 01:49PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Recently showing:
Ruby Neri
http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com/?n=artists&aid=15&c=works

















There's kind of a savage beauty or near ugliness that she can hover in, in the better works, I mostly like her paintings, but only some of her sculpture.


message 7: by Ed (last edited Apr 29, 2011 03:00PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Here's an incredible yarn.

"French artist Juliana Santacruz Herrera takes a lack of sidewalk repair services in Paris into her own hands by filling the potholes with spools of multi-colored yarn, both brightening the city and drawing attention to its flaws at the same time...."





her gallery...


message 8: by Amalie (new)

Amalie  | 157 comments I'm new to the group and I simply don't no where to start! Almost all threads look equally interesting. I guess I'll start here. Aleta Pippin's art does look quite excellent!

I'm someone who paint as a hobby (I'd not call myself an artist) and yes, calls it abstract- but it's not about mixing colours or the best brush strokes but the massages. While many can do all sort of experiments with colours only few can tell stories and I think she does just that. I'm really enjoying the group.


message 9: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I also like Aleta Pippin's art work and also the one above. I think that is so quaint that she uses yarn to block the potholes in the ground. It does add color to the gray of the roads. She would have a field day with all the potholes in Hawaii.


message 10: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Happy birthday, Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907)


message 11: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Ed wrote: "Happy birthday, Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907)"

Thanks for recognizing that , Ed!


message 12: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8396 comments Amalie wrote: "I'm new to the group and I simply don't no where to start! Almost all threads look equally interesting. I guess I'll start here. Aleta Pippin's art does look quite excellent!

I'm someone who pa..."


Welcome, Amalie!


message 13: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Hi Amalie, Welcome to this group!


message 14: by Ed (last edited Jul 15, 2011 09:45PM) (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments This artist, Gillian Ayres, is not exactly unknown, and has received a lot of attention in Britain. She's now 80 and lives in a 15th-century cottage at Morwenstow on the Devon-Cornwall border. I'd never heard of her. I came across he by sheer chance and, personally I immediately felt a kinship. See what you think.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gillian_...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/ar...

http://www.royalacademy.org.uk/ra-mag...
RA Magazine Winter 2009
Issue Number: 105
In the studio: Gillian Ayres RA


Gillian Ayres RA in her studio in north Cornwall. Photograph by Eamonn McCabe
The studio of Gillian Ayres RA – in a woodman’s cottage – lies hidden in a far-flung corner of Cornwall. The pastoral nature of the scene belies a hive of activity, with massive canvases taking up all available space. Fiona Maddocks meets the painter who shows no sign of easing up as she approaches her 80s.
Finding Gillian Ayres proves difficult. You turn confidently off the gloriously named Atlantic Highway long before Land’s End and then it’s guesswork. The approach is steep, down an unmarked lane winding beneath a canopy of trees. She came to her hideaway on the Devon-Cornwall border twenty years ago, looking for peace and quiet.
So completely did she succeed that even the postman shrugs, denying all knowledge of the famous Royal Academician who produces huge, vibrant canvases from a small white studio adjoining her ancient cottage. When eventually we locate her, it’s obvious we have come to the right place....



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Further reading

Fortnum, Rebecca (2007-01-23). Contemporary British Women Artists: In Their Own Words. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 9781845112240.
Gooding, Mel; Gillian Ayres (2001-09). Gillian Ayres. Lund Humphries Publishers. ISBN 9780853318095.
Contemporary British Women Artists: In Their Own Words
Gillian Ayres


message 15: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I can see where she would need a bigger canvas, it wouldn't do justice to her fabulous artwork. I think art does not have to represent anything which I thought in my younger years that it was supposed to represent something. It is how the piece makes the artist feel inside. I find her work very whimsical.


message 16: by Gianna (new)

Gianna | 19 comments My mom, Deidre Scherer, is a fabric and thread artist.
Here's her website: http://www.dscherer.com/
While she is well known locally and among Hospice and other Palliative care circles, I'm not sure if any of you have heard about her and her work.
Here's an excerpt from a group show she's a part of:
"Deidre Scherer pioneered the figurative potential of her medium; thread on layered fabric. Her work has been exhibited at over 160 venues nationally and internationally including the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Museum of Fine Arts in Springfield, MA; the Hebrew Union College Museum in NYC; the Renwick in Washington, DC; the Dennis Woodman Gallery in Kew, England; and the Maltwood Art Museum in Victoria, British Columbia.
“Fabric stirs our sense of touch – we are wrapped in cloth from birth through death. By combining the techniques of piecing, layering and machine-sewing, I create a lively surface that intimately engages the viewer.

Scherer received the 2008 Humanities Award from AAHPM as well as fellowships from the Vermont Arts Council and The Open Society Institute. Her pieces grace many book covers and articles. She wrote about the inspirational development of her art in Deidre Scherer: Work in Fabric & Thread (C&T Publishing, 1998.) In hundreds of private collections, her work is also found at the Baltimore Museum of Art; the Cahoon Museum of American Art in Cotuit, MA; and the Museum of Science in Boston. Scherer has completed numerous private commissions as well as public works at St. Mary’s Hospital in Rochester, NY; and the Tuck School at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH."

I'm not sure how to post a photo, but please check out her website...it's amazing (putting bias aside!)!!


message 17: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 368 comments Gianna wrote: "My mom, Deidre Scherer, is a fabric and thread artist.
Here's her website: http://www.dscherer.com/
While she is well known locally and among Hospice and other Palliative care circles, I'm not ..."

Gianna, your mother's artwork is so lovely. It gives so much dignity to the elders. I've spent a lot of time with older adults the past few years between a healthcare job (just retired!!!), and some older relatives so I really appreciate her caring outlook.


message 18: by Connie (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 368 comments Ed, thanks for sharing the information about Gillian Ayres. Her paintings are gloriously vibrant. She sounds like an amazing woman.


message 19: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Gianna wrote: "My mom, Deidre Scherer, is a fabric and thread artist.
Here's her website: http://www.dscherer.com/
While she is well known locally and among Hospice and other Palliative care circles, I'm not ..."


This is very interesting work. I have seen a fair amount of layered fabric work (I live with an art quilter.) This seems unique in that if has a really expressionistic but naturalistic quality, like the painter Alice Neel, but I haven't seen something quite like it in fabric.


message 20: by Gianna (new)

Gianna | 19 comments Thanks Ed,
She started with her technique when I was just a toddler (er, 40 years ago!). You just have to see it in person :) She does show with certain art quilting shows, but in the past had a difficult time being recognized as a "fine" artist (fitting into the fine-art scene and their narrow ideas of what art is). I remember the piles of reject letters from galleries...now people solicit her and often there's a waiting list!!


message 21: by Gianna (new)

Gianna | 19 comments Connie wrote: "Gianna wrote: "My mom, Deidre Scherer, is a fabric and thread artist.
Here's her website: http://www.dscherer.com/
While she is well known locally and among Hospice and other Palliative care ci..."


Thanks Connie,
Yes she has spent much time scetching the elderly and dying, from which she does her fabric work. Families have asked her to come to share/witness their loved one's deaths. Documenting aging and the part of life that which is dying, is beautiful...although many people have a difficult seeing that aspect.


message 22: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) My grandmother was an amazing ceramic artist, seamstress, and she even made beaded curtains out of magazines, and I guess use pencils for the form. Also was a great cook as well. Whatever she did she did it exceptionally well, her family was from the Azores.


message 23: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments "
A radical reappraisal of Wilhelmina Barns-Graham at The Fleming Collection
LONDON.- The painter Wilhelmina Barns-Graham is usually classified as a St Ives School artist yet her Scottish roots and her continuing close links with her homeland had a huge influence on her work. A major exhibition marking the centenary of her birth being held at The Fleming Collection at 13 Berkeley Street, London W1 from 10 January to 5 April 2012...." More...

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message 24: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Eisenmeier (carpelibrumbooks) | 27 comments That was pretty interesting.


message 25: by Poly (new)

Poly Ethylene Ed wrote: --A radical reappraisal of Wilhelmina Barns-Graham.

If it looks like it was done by a ten year old, it’ the artist’s problem, not the viewers.



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