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Off Topic > HarperCollins tries to kill off libraries - Puts 26 Loan Cap on Ebook Circulations

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message 1: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments I'm so very angry right now!!

http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home...

I'll comment on this later. Right now I'm too busy composing a really angry letter.


message 2: by Tina (new)

Tina | 177 comments Gah! There is so much wrong with that I don't even know where to begin with the rant.


message 3: by Lou (new)

Lou (loumassignani) Post what they publish, relative to what people in this group would read, and I would gladly boycott. This is bullshit.


message 4: by Lou (new)

Lou (loumassignani) Lou wrote: "Post what they publish, relative to what people in this group would read, and I would gladly boycott. This is bullshit."


Oooph I just checked that out myself. They've got some heavy hitters.


message 5: by Lou (new)

Lou (loumassignani) Jesus I think everyone writes for them.


message 6: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) Yeah, they're a big'un. =\

Not that I agree with the decision, but I can see why they'd do something like this. Files are forever, hard copies are not, so with ebooks gaining popularity, they'd eventually start seeing less library restock revenue.

It's a shame though, because libraries are already hurting enough in this economy and this is certainly not going to help. =\

26 seems like a ridiculously low number of rentals though. My local library has books in their inventory that were purchased or donated decades ago. Certainly more than 26 people have read those and they are still holding up and readable. It does seem rather greedy of HarperCollins to set this kind of limitation and then make the number so low. I could see something in the hundreds perhaps, 300 or 500 maybe, but 26 is ridiculous.


message 7: by Tina (new)

Tina | 177 comments I don't have a problem with the idea of limiting the number, but at least do some market research and figure out the average number of loans that a popular book hits in any given area before the book has to be removed or restocked. 26 is ridiculously low. I agree 200 to 300 is more realistic.

Actually they could go higher because unlike physical books that could get torn, dropped in the bathtub, etc. there is no fear of real physical damage.


message 8: by Lou (new)

Lou (loumassignani) I wonder if a renewal counts as a reloan. If so than libraries are really screwed. I have to believe print copies of books last way longer than 26 weeks in a library.


message 9: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) Lou wrote: "I wonder if a renewal counts as a reloan. If so than libraries are really screwed. I have to believe print copies of books last way longer than 26 weeks in a library."

Good question.


message 10: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) Lou wrote: "I wonder if a renewal counts as a reloan. If so than libraries are really screwed. I have to believe print copies of books last way longer than 26 weeks in a library."

I was wondering that too.


message 11: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments They don't allow renewals - one person, one loan. Oooh, this makes me so mad!


message 12: by Tina (new)

Tina | 177 comments It makes me both mad and sad. For me, reading and book buying is a major addiction and the library was my gateway drug.

I can't help but feel this will somehow lessen accessibility to a pool of future potential readers. Especially since kids today are very comfortable with digital content in many forms. And especially since library budgets are shrinking and they are probably looking for as many ways as possible to stretch the money they do receive while trying to stay accessible and relevant.

It just seems like a huge step backwards when the industry should be looking forward.


message 13: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) I think you're right, Tina. It likely will reduce the availability of books -- libraries won't be able to afford a new license every 6 months or so.

Chances are, many of those people who would have used the library will turn to pirated copies instead.


message 14: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments So, librarians seems to be on the verge of revolt!
________
http://librarianinblack.net/librarian...

The eBook User’s Bill of Rights
February 28, 2011The eBook User’s Bill of Rights is a statement of the basic freedoms that should be granted to all eBook users.

The eBook User’s Bill of Rights


Every eBook user should have the following rights:

•the right to use eBooks under guidelines that favor access over proprietary limitations
•the right to access eBooks on any technological platform, including the hardware and software the user chooses
•the right to annotate, quote passages, print, and share eBook content within the spirit of fair use and copyright
•the right of the first-sale doctrine extended to digital content, allowing the eBook owner the right to retain, archive, share, and re-sell purchased eBooks
I believe in the free market of information and ideas.

I believe that authors, writers, and publishers can flourish when their works are readily available on the widest range of media. I believe that authors, writers, and publishers can thrive when readers are given the maximum amount of freedom to access, annotate, and share with other readers, helping this content find new audiences and markets. I believe that eBook purchasers should enjoy the rights of the first-sale doctrine because eBooks are part of the greater cultural cornerstone of literacy, education, and information access.

Digital Rights Management (DRM), like a tariff, acts as a mechanism to inhibit this free exchange of ideas, literature, and information. Likewise, the current licensing arrangements mean that readers never possess ultimate control over their own personal reading material. These are not acceptable conditions for eBooks.

I am a reader. As a customer, I am entitled to be treated with respect and not as a potential criminal. As a consumer, I am entitled to make my own decisions about the eBooks that I buy or borrow.

I am concerned about the future of access to literature and information in eBooks. I ask readers, authors, publishers, retailers, librarians, software developers, and device manufacturers to support these eBook users’ rights.

These rights are yours. Now it is your turn to take a stand. To help spread the word, copy this entire post, add your own comments, remix it, and distribute it to others. Blog it, Tweet it (#ebookrights), Facebook it, email it, and post it on a telephone pole.


message 15: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Library cuts will deny our children the glorious addiction of reading By Chris Boffey

We need to protest over closing libraries as strongly as people did over the planned sell-off of woodlands

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/...

In what is grandly called my study, previously known as the playroom and before that the back bedroom, I am carefully selecting small portions of my life and dispatching them to the recycling bin. I have so many books that four weeks ago, before the decorators arrived, a removal firm was called in to box them up and take them into storage. Now the paint is dry they are back, but some of them have to go.

Throwing away NCTJ Teeline Gold Standard for Journalists: from Beginner to 100 Wpm with Essential Speed Building and Exam Practice is not a problem, and the Guide to French Hotels 1999 is tossed out without a second thought, but there are thousands of others that are close to my heart.

Books are my disease; a sickness I have passed on to my children and one I was afflicted with more than 50 years ago by my father, a printer of comics. Every Friday he would come home from work with a rolled up bundle that included the Beano, Dandy, Topper, Beezer, the Victor and the Rover, and even the Bunty and the Judy. I must be one of the few men who can name the surnames of the Four Marys, a group of boarding school girls whose adventures graced the pages of the Bunty.

The disease was voracious and one that was fed by the local council. Every Tuesday and Thursday a mobile library rolled up into the grounds of a school at the bottom of the road and opened its doors. We were allowed four books at a time and couldn't get enough. There was no proper library in our part of Wythenshawe in south Manchester because the council estate had only just been built and homes and schools were more important.

A few years later there was a real library with reading tables and librarians who said "shush" in the time-honoured fashion. Libraries were omnipresent, like tap water, washdays on Monday and park attendants who shouted at children. Like woodlands and forests.

Last week the list of the most borrowed authors from public libraries was published and seven of the top 10 authors were the writers of children's fiction. The large volume of children's authors continues the upward trend of recent years for kids' fiction to be the dominant force. The Public Lending Right, which monitors the books borrowed from public libraries, said almost 80% of five to 10-year-olds used municipal libraries.

But for how much longer? Log on to falseeconomy.org.uk and check the interactive map which details the hundreds of libraries across the country that are being closed; almost certainly there will be one near you.

The libraries are being shut by the local councils because the money they receive from national government is being cut. The argument, a good one, goes that it is better than cutting social services, school funding or looking after the elderly.

There are groups across the country protesting against their councils' decisions, but the outcry is piecemeal. Unlike the mass uprising against the sell-off of the woodlands, which forced the minister to publicly apologise for her mistake, there is no pressure on central government.

How can we get the communities minister, Eric Pickles, to admit it is his fault that libraries are closing, and that our children are being denied a glorious and life-improving addiction?


message 16: by Becky (new)

Becky (beckyofthe19and9) RECYCLING BIN?? Say it ain't so! *shudder*

I did a blog post about the HarperCollins thing the other day, and I'll be sure to post the ebook Bill of Rights as well.

Thanks for sharing, MrsJ. :)


message 17: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments We need more serious librarians. :-)
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message 18: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Welcome, Becky. This is something that really concerns me a lot.


message 19: by Steve (new)

Steve Thomas | 102 comments It always frustrates me to see an industry fighting tooth and nail NOT to go digital, and failing to learn any lessons from what came before.

Music piracy became less of a problem because of Pandora and iTunes, not DRM. TV and Movie piracy went down because of Hulu and Netflix, not DRM.

When people want to get something for free, they will find a way, unless you give them a reasonable, cheap alternative. With eBooks, that includes libraries.

Publishers: Libraries are not your enemies. Libraries give you exposure to new audiences who may someday go on to actually buy more of your books, and their very presence helps add to the culture of literacy. Play nice with the libraries, or they won't be giving you free PR.


message 20: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) Steve wrote: "It always frustrates me to see an industry fighting tooth and nail NOT to go digital, and failing to learn any lessons from what came before.

Music piracy became less of a problem because of Pando..."


Well stated!!!!


message 21: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments I agree!


message 22: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments Steve wrote: "It always frustrates me to see an industry fighting tooth and nail NOT to go digital, and failing to learn any lessons from what came before.

Music piracy became less of a problem because of Pando..."


Well stated, indeed!


message 23: by Terry (last edited Apr 07, 2011 02:43PM) (new)

Terry Simpson | 261 comments Why fight the digital advance? Smdh..... I have bought more books digitally at this point than I did in print.


message 24: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments I've bought a heck of a lot of ebooks, too.

I think one reason for this is that the publishers are probably seeing the money making possibilities in this. It's costs them virtually nothing to make an ebook. Yet they charge a fair amount for them, some of them going up to $10.00 or more, which is a rip off.


message 25: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Kindle users on Amazon have been tanking reviews due to ebook pricing.


message 26: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments I wonder if publishers will ever change that. It would be a better way to fight piracy.


message 27: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments They are too busy patting themselves on the back to realize that they are losing customers left and right.

And when they do realize they are losing customers - they blame it on piracy. I've stopped buying Harper Collins, I don't care who they pub...I'm sure others are just like me. I'm sure that they will place the blame on other things than their bad business.


message 28: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments I was looking for an ebook version of The Grapes of Wrath to buy. If memory serves, it was something like $12.00 on Amazon! Steinbeck IS DEAD for pete's sake! Talk about publishers taking advantage... O_O

I ended up pirating it. And I'm not ashamed to admit it. LOL


message 29: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments LOL!


message 30: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments What??! Are you trying to throw common sense in there? Off with her head! That's not allowed in the publishing world.


message 31: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments An uprising! That's a good idea, MrsJoseph. We could not only create lower ebook prices, we can also make history! :) A comforting thought while we rot in jail. LOL


message 32: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments lol!


message 33: by Bill (new)

Bill (kernos) | 350 comments I suspect they are working out the process so they can limit the number of times a consumer e-book can be read.


message 34: by Jason (new)

Jason (darkfiction) | 3204 comments RISE!!!!!


*I wish there was an emoticon for a fist in the air*


message 35: by MrsJoseph *grouchy*, *good karma* (new)

MrsJoseph *grouchy* (mrsjoseph) | 7282 comments Kernos wrote: "I suspect they are working out the process so they can limit the number of times a consumer e-book can be read."

I do, too. The problem they will always face are hackers. There's another site I'm on where a lot of hackers hang out. Their motto: "You make it, we break it."

Thank goodness for hackers. :-)


message 36: by Bill (new)

Bill (kernos) | 350 comments What site, Mrs J?


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