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Group Read > What's eating Gilbert Grape ? ~ March 2011

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message 1: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 03, 2011 06:46AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments What: This is our March 2011 Group Read

Book: What's Eating Gilbert Grape by Peter HedgesWhat's Eating Gilbert Grape

Author: Peter Hedges Peter Hedges
About the Author
Peter Hedges, a novelist and playwright, grew up in West Des Moines, Iowa. His newest novel is An Ocean in Iowa. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and two children.

When: The discussion will begin on March 1, 2011
However, the thread will remain open, so you can comment at any time.

Where:
The discussion will take place in this thread

Spoiler Etiquette: If given away a major plot element, please use GR's spoiler tag or put the words Spoiler and Part # at the top of your post. There are 7 parts to the story.

Book Details:Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (November 1, 1999)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0671038540

Synopsis: Just about everything in Endora, Iowa (pop. 1,091 and dwindling) is eating Gilbert Grape, a twenty-four-year-old grocery clerk who dreams only of leaving. His enormous mother, once the town sweetheart, has been eating nonstop ever since her husband's suicide, and the floor beneath her TV chair is threatening to cave in. Gilbert's long-suffering older sister, Amy, still mourns the death of Elvis, and his knockout younger sister has become hooked on makeup, boys, and Jesus -- in that order. But the biggest event on the horizon for all the Grapes is the eighteenth birthday of Gilbert's younger brother, Arnie, who is a living miracle just for having survived so long. As the Grapes gather in Endora, a mysterious beauty glides through town on a bicycle and rides circles around Gilbert, until he begins to see a new vision of his family and himself.

Amazon Link-
http://www.amazon.com/Whats-Eating-Gi...

Movie Link:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108550/
Director: Lasse Hallström
Writers: Peter Hedges (novel), Peter Hedges (screenplay)
Stars:Johnny Depp, Leonardo DiCaprio and Juliette Lewis


message 2: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments OK, as usual library by my house does not have the book, placed it on hold in another branch requesting that they bring it to the one by my house. Geeeeshhhh
I would think that the library being on the grounds of a community college would have the book, but I'm guessing it keeps more scholarly books.


message 3: by Bobbie (new)

Bobbie (bobbie572002) | 1084 comments My library says it is available. I will go and see if they are telling the truth. Too much snow and slush to deal with it today.


Susan (aka Just My Op) (justmyop) | 234 comments I'm surprised and disappointed -- the large library district that I use has 10 copies of the movie on DVD but not a single copy of the book. The smaller library district has 1 copy of the movie but no copy of the book.


message 5: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments My library has the DVD. Though 2 people have a hold on it before me.

They do have a copy of the book, but it looks like it's in storage.

I am shocked that this popular movie is so hard to find in book form.


message 6: by Amy (new)

Amy I have my copy, as my library had a copy with no reserves :) Only 39 pages in but am enjoying it so far. I have seen the movie before, so I am interested to find out what the book is like. They are usually better than the movie in most cases!


message 7: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer (chirpybird) | 18 comments ***POSSIBLE SPOILERS!***

I finished the book last week, and really liked it! I loved how the author wrote, and how the story was very down to earth. He did a good job with character development, and I really got attached to Gilbert and Arnie.

I watched the movie after reading the book. It seems like they really wanted to follow the book, which I like, but of course in a movie you dont' really get a lot of time, so some parts were different, shorter, or cut out altogether, like most movies made from books. But the parts in the movie were good, and true to the book. I didn't like Becky in the movie at all, however. The girl that plays her looked NOTHING like the Becky in the book, and reading the book first, I wanted her to be this gorgeous girl with long, flowing black hair but they picked Juliette Lewis (to me, kinda creepy looking and not very pretty, at least to me!) with black hair chopped super close to her skull. The WHOLE movie that bothered me lol, I mean, this girl is supposed to glow, and be beautiful, which is why all the guys in the movie are captivated with her, but it seemed like this just focused on Gilbert liking her at first sight (and barely) and not all the other guys talking about her like in the book. Other than that, though, the characters were played really well by the rest of the cast. I definitely recommend the book over the movie!


message 8: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Thanks for reading the group read Jennifer.

The book is in transit to me from the library. I'll read it next after I finish my current read,
Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery.

I wasn't able to find any discussion questions. I did find one source, but they were from an individual, and I didn't want to copy that. Anyway, while the book is fresh in your mind, if there are any discussion questions you can up with for the group that would be great.


message 9: by Amy (last edited Mar 01, 2011 03:28PM) (new)

Amy In the back of my book it has some study questions, so I thought I would post them here :)

****POSSIBLE SPOILERS****

1. In the First Chapter, Arnie Grape tells Gilbert, "You're getting littler and littler. You're shrinking." "Stupid people sometime say the smartest things." Gilbert refects. With this exchange, what themes does Peter Hedges begin to develop in his novel? How is Gilbert shrinking?

2. Consider the nature of Gilbert's relationship with Becky alongside his relationship with Mrs.Carver. What do these characters mean to Gilbert? Do they present him with the same possibilities for escape, love and healing? Explain.

3. Remembered chiefly for his relentless "optimism", Albert Grape nevertheless hung himself in his basement. How might this irony persist in Gilbert's own life, particularly in his relationship with his boss, Mr Lamson? Throughout the novel, what does Gilbert reveal to us about his father? What sort of legacy has Albert left his son?

4. Unlike Amy and Gilbert, who have stayed behind to take care of Momma and Arnie, Larry and Janice have managed to escape, at least physically and geographically. What significance lies in Hedges decision to make Janice an airline stewardess a job that requires perpetual flight? Why has Larry all but cut himself off from his family?

5. Who is Lance Dodge? What does his success represent to each of the novel's characters?

6. What kind of person is Gilbert's younger sister Ellen? Discuss Hedges use of dialogue to develop her character. What is the source of Ellen's hostility towards Gilbert? Why might the fact that Gilbert has done nothing since high school frighten her?

7. On a final tour of the condemned elementary school, Becky hopes to help Gilbert "say goodbye". What comes of Gilbert's recollection of his second-grade trauma? And why do you suppose Hedges places this scene just after the one in which Gilbert witnesses Mr.Carver's adultery with a bewigged Melanie? How does this pair of scenes affect Gilbert? How does the novel unfold in the aftermath of these episodes?

8. About Momma, Gilbert says, "She thought she was going to enjoy my hate. But it has broken her." Discuss the nature of Gilbert's relationship with his mother, who can't seem to look at Gilbert without seeing her dead husband's face.

9. Over many bottles of beer - and accompanied by the songs of Sinatra and Elvis - the Grape children gather around Momma's body to perform a makeshift memorial service. What is happening here? Discuss the character's tacit decision to burn the house down. In addition to their wish to avoid the embarrassment and humiliation of having all of Endora gather to watch Momma's body removed from the house by a crane, what might the destruction of the house represent to the Grapes?

10. Faced with Momma's steady growth, dwarfed by Endora's barren landscape, and resentful of the invasion of corporate America in the form of the hulking Food Land and the prefab Burger Barn, Gilbert has long felt trapped and dissatisfied with his life. But as "the walls in Momma's room fall down in flames," What's eating Gilbert Grape ends with an unexpected sense of contentment, offering an idyllic image of family togetherness: The Grape children huddled together before the house as silent spectators. What might Hedges be suggesting here? Are the children liberated? What do you imagine happens to each character after the novel ends?



message 10: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Amy, you are AWESOME !!

Thanks so much for typing out all those questions.


message 11: by Amy (new)

Amy Alias Reader wrote: "Amy, you are AWESOME !!

Thanks so much for typing out all those questions."


No worries :)


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I just read chapter 1 and so far so good.

I just wanted to comment on the author photo that is at the back of my hardcover book. The author looks about 20 ! I just checked wiki, however, and he was born in 1962.

I also wanted to comment on the use of the word retarded. It's my understanding that this is not an acceptable term anymore. The book was written in 1999. I wonder if he is using the term, knowing that it isn't acceptable to make some point, or were ideas about this different ten years ago.


Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) I know I bought this book, but now I can't find it...still searching!


message 14: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I just read chapter 1 and so far so good.

I just wanted to comment on the author photo that is at the back of my hardcover book. The author looks about 20 ! I just checked wiki, however, and he..."


I don't think it was acceptable back then either. I remember being a teen, calling someone a retard was an insult. To me that's the thing of the Gilbert character through his actions in the book he shows his love to Arnie, but yet still mentions him as a 'retard'.


Susan (aka Just My Op) (justmyop) | 234 comments It seems to me, too, that the term was seen as offensive well before 1999. I still hear some people use it, but I think it is often used by those not realizing it is offensive rather than those using it to try to insult. Of course, there are exceptions....


message 16: by Amy (new)

Amy I think he has used the term retarded on purpose. The novel is from Gilbert's point of view and so it is really Gilbert who refers to him as a retard (I don't think any other character refers to him like this). In a way I feel this belittles Arnie a bit, which shows that while Gilbert loves Arnie immensely, he also resents him at times. If it wasn't for Arnie's disability, Gilbert's family would not need him so much and therefore Gilbert would not be stuck in the life he currently has.


message 17: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 03, 2011 06:49AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I was looking over the book last night and I see it has 7 parts. So if you are going to discuss a major spoiler in your post, lets put the part # at the top of the post and the words SPOILER.

Thanks !


message 18: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 03, 2011 07:02AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Part 1

I just finished part one and it looks like this will be a quick read.

I agree that Gilbert loves Arnie, yet is resentful. That seem very reasonable. Though it seems like Arnie isn't the only reason he is resentful. His whole family situation is chaotic. It seems that Amy & Gilbert have taken on the parent role. He also lives in a small town with a rising elderly population. And he is in a dead end job.

It's interesting that he mentions the elderly population and what seems like a dying town, yet he mentions a few times in Part 1, how he hates the new technology and like quiet. Even the bells at the gas station and the stores bother him. That's not the usual reaction of a 24 year old.

Do you think they are enabling the mother with her weight issue and her smoking? Do they have a choice? I would imagine it adds to their stress knowing they are the ones feeding her and buying her cigarettes.


message 19: by Amy (last edited Mar 03, 2011 02:10PM) (new)

Amy I think they are enabling her, but at the same time Bonnie Grape seems like a very demanding, unrelenting person and wouldn't accept any disrespect. And in spite of eveything, the children still seem to respect her (or is it fear and pity disguised as respect?). At the end of it all, they are stuck in this horrible situation and none of the Grape children have the backbone to stand up to their mother and say this is wrong what they are helping their mother do to herself.


message 20: by Amy (new)

Amy More on that point, what is everyone's opinion about Bonnie Grape? Do you empathise with her and understand why she is doing this to herself? Or is she being selfish?


message 21: by Amy (new)

Amy Alias Reader wrote: "I would imagine it adds to their stress knowing they are the ones feeding her and buying her cigarettes. ..."

** POSSIBLE SPOILER (ALMOST) **

Towards the end of Part 2, after Gilbert does the shopping for the family, he is disgusted about the amount of food and reflects about how it is not right to be doing this for their mother. So he obviously does feel the stress of this, but still does not comment or do any practical about it.


message 22: by Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) (last edited Mar 04, 2011 05:42AM) (new)

Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) I found it!! (the book that is!) and read three chapters thus far. I think Gilbert is just being a "normal" brother by name calling his brother. It is a very typical type reaction and literally means little. It was also probably cool to do that and made Gilbert look "smart mouthed."

From just a few pages, we can see that this family is in trouble. They have a lot on their plate with an overweight mom and a teenage beauty who seems to be "on the prowl." I presume that the brother is Down's Syndrome since there is reference to his possibly dying before he is ten. (heart)

I like the perspective of Gilbert. You can tell he loves/hates his family and the role he is forced to play. What teenager does not have these feelings? It is like he can say anything he wants about his family, but just let anyone else try and they are "cruising for a bruising."

Oops! He is not exactly a teenager!


message 23: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 03, 2011 03:36PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Amy wrote: "More on that point, what is everyone's opinion about Bonnie Grape? Do you empathise with her and understand why she is doing this to herself? Or is she being selfish?"

-------------

I've only read up to chapter 13. At this point I am on the fence. Her weight, cigarette smoking, and abandonment of the family make me dislike her. On the flip side, her downfall began when her husband committed suicide. I need to read more, to really form an opinion.

What do you think up to this point, (Part 2) Amy ?


message 24: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I'm glad you found the book, Marialyce !


message 25: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments I think Gilbert feels all the feelings mentioned and more. He feels love for his family, Ok, so maybe not all of them but for Amy and Arnie. In addition he is frustrated in my opinion, feels held back by his family, if it was not for them he would have been out of town quite a while back.
One more feeling I don't think anyone has mentioned, embarrassment. He feels embarrassed by his family and their issues and quirks. For this I think everyone at one point or another has felt that about their family.

I do feel to a certain extent the family is enabling the mother continuing to bring her cigarettes and food. But I do get the feeling she is a bit of a tyrant, demanding this or that, get me this or that. I feel the kids somewhat fear her or what her reactions are going to be. I do feel she has her issues but I think she could help herself a bit. I agree with Gilbert's comment about eating yourself to death is also a form of suicide.


message 26: by Amy (new)

Amy I am currently in the beginnings of Part 4.

I can sympathise with her that a terrible thing happened, she lost her love and she has felt abanoned by her husband, who she considers "took the easy way out" by commiting suicide (even though her eating and smoking is a kind of suicide too). So I can understand the why of her behaviour but not the how.

I don't understand how she could abanoned her children, who have also been through this same trauma and become this burden that they have to give up their lives to support. She does love her children, especially Arnie, this is evident (thought she has a difficult relationship with Gilbert because he reminds her of her husband) but at the end of the day she has already quit life and has chosen to follow her husband to the grave, even if it is a slower death, and is forcing her children to watch. This is what unsettles me.

As you read more of the book, we find out more of what Bonnie was like before and she seems like such a strong person. So I can only wonder why she hasn't drawn on that strength. Obviously her husbands death has broken her. But everyone deals with trauma differently, so it is hard to scorn her completely. I sympathise with her, but couldn't take that option myself.

So Maybe I am still on the fence too??


message 27: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I have to say my feeling became more postive for Bonnie after reading chapter 23.


Marialyce (absltmom, yaya) I am up to Part 2 and do find this an nice, easy read. I do see the super frustration present in all the Grape family members. I think they know they should do things differently, particularly in the case of the mom. They all seem to be stuck in time, their town, and their lives. All of them look for escape in some way.


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) I wasn't going to read Gilbert Grape, but have started it. My only comment right now is that I was amused to see the setting - Endora, Iowa. My great grandfather's parents lived for a number of years in Eldora, Iowa. They eventually moved west after losing their farm to several yearly plagues of locusts. That doesn't have anything to do with the very strange Grape family, but I thought I'd share.


message 30: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Have you ever visited Endora ? Is Endora a dead/dying town like it is presented in the book? It really sounds like a very depressing place to live.


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) I believe Endora is entirely fictional. I have not visited Eldora, a city of about 3,000 which is pretty darned far out in the middle of Iowa. I think the movie Twister was filmed there. Maybe someday I'll take a drive, when gas prices go down.


message 32: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Not only do the Grapes seem like a sad crew, but others in town, too.

These are my impressions up to chapter 27

Tucker, whose dream is to work at a burger joint.
What's up with his admiration of Bonnie? I don't quite get it.

Betty Carver and her husband. Obviously not a happily married couple.

The couple who own the store where Gilbert works. They have no customers. :(

The whole town, who seems drawn to shiny new things, like automatic doors and conveyor belts at the new food store. Oh and a fish tank. Gosh, if this was the highlight of my day....


message 33: by Amy (new)

Amy Finished the book today. I am going to digest it a bit and have a think about the questions before I say anything. I did really enjoy the book and towards the end my opinions of the character's improved, particularly Bonnie. I am going to rent the movie tomorrow to compare.


message 34: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I just finished the book.

Do not click on this spoiler link if you haven't finished the book.

(view spoiler)


message 35: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Question 1
1. In the First Chapter, Arnie Grape tells Gilbert, "You're getting littler and littler. You're shrinking." "Stupid people sometime say the smartest things." Gilbert refects. With this exchange, what themes does Peter Hedges begin to develop in his novel? How is Gilbert shrinking?

(view spoiler)


message 36: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments 2. Consider the nature of Gilbert's relationship with Becky

(view spoiler)


message 37: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 05, 2011 08:23PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Question 9 contains a MAJOR spoiler so I won't repeat the question here.

(view spoiler)


message 38: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments FYI
I wouldn't read the discussion questions before you read the book. They contain major spoilers.


message 39: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I just finished the book.

Do not click on this spoiler link if you haven't finished the book.

[spoilers removed]"


Have to admit I found it a very sad book , to me what was funny was the narration, the way Gilbert expressed himself. Everyone in the book seemed lost as if living in a shell, a closed off community / town. It seemed no one had any dreams, just lived life there in town.


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) I have to say that about a third of the way in, I am having trouble getting interested in any of the characters, or the plot in general. Today is pretty planned up, but Monday I should get back and give it some more attention, see if I can kindle up some enthusiasm.


message 41: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 06, 2011 07:32AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Jorge wrote: Everyone in the book seemed lost as if living in a shell, a closed off community / town. It seemed no one had any dreams, just lived life there in town.
--------------

I don't think there is anything particularly wrong with living in a small town. Not everything that is new & shiny is good or worthwhile. Simplicity, peace and quiet has a lot to say for it.

You do have the grocery store owner, Mr. Lamson, that Gilbert worked with. He seemed quite content. I was disappointed in the (view spoiler)

You also have Lance. He's left Endora and gone on to "bigger and better things". He has "fame" but he seems quite shallow to me.

Gilbert's sister and brother have left Endora. They don't particularly seem any happier then the people they've left. Though financially they are better off.


message 42: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 06, 2011 07:34AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments Sherry (sethurner) wrote: "I have to say that about a third of the way in, I am having trouble getting interested in any of the characters, or the plot in general. Today is pretty planned up, but Monday I should get back an..."

-------------

I ended giving the book 4/5. The last quarter or so, starting with a scene at the Berger Barn, I had tears in my eyes until the end of the book. I didn't know I care so much about the characters until that point.


message 43: by Amy (new)

Amy Alias Reader wrote: "I ended giving the book 4/5. The last quarter or so, starting with a scene at the Berger Barn, I had tears in my eyes until the end of the book. I didn't know I care so much about the characters until that point..."

I also gave the book 4 out of 5 stars and like you I had tears in the last half of the book.


message 44: by Mad Dog (new)

Mad Dog | 116 comments I am halfway through this book and I am enjoying it a lot. I enjoy the character of Gilbert Grape. He is largely a jerk, but there is enough sweetness and nobility in him to make me really root for him. He has a lot to overcome. As far as Becky (the 'girl on the bike'), I think she is a fine character that adds some mystery to the book... until she gets too involved in the action. When she does get more involved in the action, she seems too much the stereotypical quirky, all-wise female. Some things are better left unsaid.


message 45: by Amy (last edited Mar 07, 2011 01:52PM) (new)

Amy Mad Dog wrote: "I am halfway through this book and I am enjoying it a lot. I enjoy the character of Gilbert Grape. He is largely a jerk, but there is enough sweetness and nobility in him to make me really root for..."

I agree with you Mad Dog on the point of Becky. I found her at times to be annoying and as you said a bit stereotypically quirky. Without her intrusiveness I don't think the story would have developed the way it did, though even knowing this I sometimes wished she would go away. I much preferred the Character of Becky in the movie to be honest.


message 46: by Amy (new)

Amy Some of my thoughts on some of the questions:

1. In the First Chapter, Arnie Grape tells Gilbert, "You're getting littler and littler. You're shrinking." "Stupid people sometime say the smartest things." Gilbert refects. With this exchange, what themes does Peter Hedges begin to develop in his novel? How is Gilbert shrinking?

I think from this point we start to see that Gilbert is stuck, he has lost who he is! From this one exchange, Hedges sets up the basis for the whole novel and from this point we shall see if Gilbert can finally grow tall again.

2. Consider the nature of Gilbert's relationship with Becky alongside his relationship with Mrs.Carver. What do these characters mean to Gilbert? Do they present him with the same possibilities for escape, love and healing? Explain.

Becky seems to represent escape and expansion to Gilbert but also a constant torment. She forces him to look at his life and who he is. She is something new and different and is he drawn to this and lusts after her. I do agree with Alias though, I thought the 24 to 15 year old relationship a bit odd. (In the movie they make Becky older and I think this fits better with her ‘wisdom’).

On the other hand, Mrs. Carver seems more like a cage with comfort. An affair with a married woman would seem like a dangerous thing (which is something Gilbert may have been after), but instead it just seemed kind of hopeless on both their parts. They were each looking for a way out of their lives and some comfort, but they weren’t going to find it with each other in the end.

5. Who is Lance Dodge? What does his success represent to each of the novel's characters?

Lance it seems is a source of hope and admiration for the people of Endora. The one and only “celebrity” of a small town. He represents achievement and escape, and is someone they can live vicariously through. Even though they have no want of their own to do the same thing, they feel a sense of pride like they had something to do with his success.

I found Lance to be conceited and fake, someone who certainly enjoyed all the attention.

6. What kind of person is Gilbert's younger sister Ellen? Discuss Hedges use of dialogue to develop her character. What is the source of Ellen's hostility towards Gilbert? Why might the fact that Gilbert has done nothing since high school frighten her?

To me Ellen seemed liked a typical teenage girl trying to make herself different from her family (and Gilbert in particular). She tries to speak sophisticatedly and makes a point of how she is different from Gilbert. This is shown in how she often refers to how “girls bleed” and that she is “going through things that he wouldn’t understand”. With her actions and words she is trying to value herself and get recognition from her family. I found it a bit odd how she often said overtly sexual things about herself to Gilbert.


message 47: by Alias Reader (last edited Mar 07, 2011 09:16PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments END OF BOOK SPOILER COMMENTS TO FOLLOW !!!!

S P O I L E R




==========================================
Amy wrote: On the other hand, Mrs. Carver seems more like a cage with comfort. An affair with a married woman would seem like a dangerous thing (which is something Gilbert may have been after), but instead it just seemed kind of hopeless on both their parts. They were each looking for a way out of their lives and some comfort, but they weren’t going to find it with each other in the end.
---------------------------

I think in the beginning she was his "teacher".


message 48: by Mad Dog (new)

Mad Dog | 116 comments Done with it. I love this book!

My brief thoughts are here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 49: by Mad Dog (new)

Mad Dog | 116 comments Amy wrote: "Some of my thoughts on some of the questions:

1. In the First Chapter, Arnie Grape tells Gilbert, "You're getting littler and littler. You're shrinking." "Stupid people sometime say the smartest..."


I really like your answers, Amy. They are quite thoughtful. I want to use these if there is a test. I especially agree with your idea about the hopelessness of Gilbert and Mrs. Carver's relationship.


message 50: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 18814 comments I'm glad you enjoyed the book MD. I hope you can share some of your thoughts about the discussion questions.

I have the movie in transit to my library.


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