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Book Club > After the Ecstacy, the Laundry by Jack Kornfield

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message 1: by Amanda (new)

Amanda March's book is After the Ecstasy, the Laundry: How the Heart Grows Wise on the Spiritual Path by Jack Kornfield.

Kristi and I will be devising a reading schedule that splits the book over four weeks if you want to read it with us that way, or feel free to set your own pace.


message 2: by Larry (new)

Larry (dralas) | 29 comments this is a good choice for the first group read. I read it several years ago and find I reference it in talks I give a lot and recommend it to new practioners when they feel the initial rush of great experiences with meditation turn into what seems less somehow at any given moment. I hope the comments will include our own experiences along those lines. Peak experiences along with how we each motivate ourselves to continue to meditate through the ups and downs, highs and lows.


message 3: by Kristi (new)

Kristi (kristicoleman) I'll look at the book tonight and see what I can do with the reading schedule. It will probably be posted tomorrow.


message 4: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Larry wrote: "this is a good choice for the first group read. I read it several years ago and find I reference it in talks I give a lot and recommend it to new practioners when they feel the initial rush of grea..."

Sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it!


message 5: by Kim (new)

Kim | 14 comments Just ordered it. Looking forward to the discussion!


message 6: by Amanda (last edited Mar 01, 2011 02:50AM) (new)

Amanda I've read the introduction and a little bit of the first chapter and have a few thoughts.

The first is the reminder of how male-orientated Buddhism is. Take away the symbol of Guan Yin, goddess of compassion and it seems very much a boys' club. It is difficult to think of the Buddha's teaching that even the most senior nun would be below the most junior of monks without some feminist resentment, even in light of the context. It seems bizarre then that so many modern women from western cultures like myself and the wealth of female Buddhist writers are so drawn to Buddhism.

Secondly, I have been reminded that I was drawn to Buddhism, as many are, as a solution to a problem. In my teens and early adulthood I suffered from social anxiety that made it very hard to interact with people. Buddhist thought changed my outlook on life and although natually more introverted than some people, I no longer suffer from the crippling shyness of my youth.


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