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OGSG Archives > 2011: What Are You Growing?

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message 1: by K.C. (last edited Feb 19, 2011 11:06AM) (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments I'd love to see what veggies you're growing this year! My list is below (and will be kept up-to-date on my blog, here).

Veggies (and Tomatoes)
Beans (Tavera; bush)
Cabbage (Caraflex)
Carrots (Mokum)
Collards (Champion)
Cucumber (Diamant; pickling)
Eggplant (Hansel)
Garlic (Korean red; hardneck) *
Garlic (Spanish roja; hardneck) *
Jerusalem Artichoke **
Kale (Starbor; curly)
Kale (Toscano; savoyed)
Lettuce mix (All-star gourmet mix)
Onion (long-day; storage) ***
Peas (Caselode; shelling)
Pepper (Ace; sweet bell)
Pepper (jalapeno) ***
[Potato (haven't decided whether to do these or not)]
Radish (Easter egg mix)
Romaine (Winter density)
Salad greens (Mild mesclun mix)
Scallion (Nabechan)
Spinach (Space)
Summer squash ***
Tomato (Granadero; salsa/sauce; indeterminate)
Tomato (Monica; salsa; sauce; determinate)
Tomato (Sungold; gold cherry; indeterminate)
Turnip (Hakuri)

Herbs
Basil (Genovese)
Basil (Italian large leaf)
Cilantro (Santo)
Dill (Bouquet)
Parsley (Titan; flat leaf)
Sage ***

* Planted Fall 2010
** Planted Spring 2010
*** Sets/starts to be purchased locally


message 2: by Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (last edited Feb 19, 2011 02:49PM) (new)

Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (petra-x) Oh I wish I was your neighbour!

Good things to eat growing in my garden are:
mangoes
oranges
limes
papaya (pawpaw)
guavas
sweetwater
tamarind
passionfruit
breadfruit
thyme
garden eggs
bananas
and I think I have found a carob tree but can't quite get to it through the bush.

All the above are either wild or planted long ago, but I have also planted
tomatoes
pumpkins

I don't know if they will survive. Hopefully.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) I haven't fully decided yet though I know I will have tomato's, salad mix, green beans for sure. Scallions and parsley have so far survived winter so looks as though I'll have them again this year as well!


message 4: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments Petra X wrote: "Oh I wish I was your neighbour!

Me too! What a lovely, exotic selection - my mouth is watering!


message 5: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Kate wrote: "I'd love to see what veggies you're growing this year! My list is below (and will be kept up-to-date on my blog, here).

Veggies (and Tomatoes)
Beans (Tavera; bush)
Cabbage (Caraflex)
Carrots (Moku..."


Now I'm pining for the smell of basil growing in the garden.


message 6: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Petra X wrote: "Oh I wish I was your neighbour!

Good things to eat growing in my garden are:
mangoes
oranges
limes
papaya (pawpaw)
guavas
sweetwater
tamarind
passionfruit
breadfruit
thyme
garden eggs
bananas
and ..."


What are sweetwater, tamarind and garden eggs? I've never heard of these and would love to know what they are.


message 7: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments My plans are still up the air while I decide if I'm going to invest in some raised beds. If I do all the sunlovers will go in them and cool weather crops will go in my existing garden which is getting too shady for tomatoes, basil, peppers etc.


message 8: by Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (last edited Feb 20, 2011 06:07PM) (new)

Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (petra-x) Tamarind is a huge, beautiful tree that produces pods with a pulp you can use instead of lemons or in curries, but although its sour its also rich and fruity. Its a very common tree in a lot of the world. One thing we make with them here are tamarind balls - little balls of pulp rolled with its own weight in sugar and some black pepper. You can buy the pulp in Caribbean or (East) Indian shops.

These pics show the tree, the pods and further down the beautiful flowers. http://www.google.com/images?q=tamari...

Garden eggs are a variety of aubergines/eggplant that look like eggs http://www.goodreads.com/photo/user/1...

I have no idea what the real name of sweetwater is. Its a tree that gets covered in masses of small white blossoms whose scent carries a long way. Later there are pods that you break up and suck the juice from - it tastes like slightly perfumed sugar water.

I forgot I also have soursop. This is a huge fruit whose pulp smells exactly like Ribena, a blackcurrant syrup, but tastes only like soursop. We make milkshakes, icecreams and daquiries with it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soursop

There is also a small sugar apple tree. They are a relative of soursop but small and taste unbelievably sweet and custardy and have a slightly granular texture like someone mixed brown sugar in. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar-apple

There is also a mammey apple tree that didn't fruit last year. I hope it does this year. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sapote

Also a noni tree. This is disgusting. It smells like rotted meat and fruit, it looks even worse when it falls. But its medicinal, if you can stand it. http://www.google.com/search?sourceid...

Wow, that was a bit long, sorry.


message 9: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Petra X wrote: "Tamarind is a huge, beautiful tree that produces pods with a pulp you can use instead of lemons or in curries, but although its sour its also rich and fruity. Its a very common tree in a lot of t..."

This is fascinating to me. I love hearing about all the different things other people grow in different areas.


message 10: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments I've started parsley, kale, and scallion seeds indoors in the past week or two. I don't really know what I'm doing, as this is the first time I've ever started seeds indoors. Many have germinated and sprouted, but now I'm realizing I need to rig up an additional light source for the seedlings. Such an adventure.

Anybody here experienced with seed starting?


Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (petra-x) I used to be good at it, I had lots of tricks gleaned from other gardeners, but I never had much luck with parsley.


message 12: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments I've read that parsley has a long time to germination and can have low germination rates. I got about 50% germination with my parsley seeds, but now I'm just trying to figure out how to get the sprouts to grow into healthy seedlings. We'll see how it goes!


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) I direct sowed mine and have had it growing the same container outside for a few years now! (Curley leaf, not flat leaf).

You should have a heating mat to place your containers on as well as a light source, mist your soil often using a spray bottle to keep moist (don't water like you would a grown plant), use a seed starting mix and not potting soil; using peat pots or unbleached dixie cups works great too because they're not so small you need to worry about the seedlings getting root-bound and once you've gotten them used to being out doors, you can plant the whole thing in the ground/container because they're biodegradeable! I don't like those plastic domed 'greenhouses' because I always ended up with mold so I stopped using them altogether a few years ago.


message 14: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments I never had much luck with starting seeds indoors I think because of my forced air heat and it being too dry an environment. I'll be sowing in the milk jugs again this year I hope with as least as good as last year's results.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) If I work @ it I've had good results with seed starting indoors but with my health, some things get put aside @ times so I have overall better results when I direct sow outside after the frost threat lifts.


message 16: by Miriam (last edited Mar 01, 2011 05:10PM) (new)

Miriam If you look at my photos on my facebook account, you will see why I cannot do any gardening inside! There is a pic of my lovely gray kitty curled up on top of the plant in a round pot, looking at me like, "isn't this what it's for?" The begonia was completely crushed. They also eat leaves. I cannot even have cut flowers inside. If something breaks off outside, I either give it to someone or keep the vase in the fridge! (They do last forever in the fridge!)


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Anything live flower & plant wise stays in our room (kitty free zone) on top of the computer desk :-)


message 18: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments Thanks for all the tips, Jo!


message 20: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Miriam wrote: "If you look at my photos on my facebook account, you will see why I cannot do any gardening inside! There is a pic of my lovely gray kitty curled up on top of the plant in a round pot, looking at m..."

I do miss being able to have bouquets in the house because of my cats. Now I content myself with putting bouquets on my patio table in the shade where I usually eat lunch in the summer. Sometimes they get wrecked in the weather, but I enjoy them while I can.


message 21: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Cheryl, keep them in the fridge when you aren't outside. They will last longer! That is what florists do.


message 22: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments Seeds have sprouted! :)

Photos of my seed-starting setup here:
http://potatoesandbeyond.blogspot.com...


message 23: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Kate (K.C.) wrote: "Seeds have sprouted! :)

Photos of my seed-starting setup here:
http://potatoesandbeyond.blogspot.com..."


Loved seeing all those little green sprouts. You go girl!!


message 24: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments Hee, thanks Cheryl! I'm a little crazy when it comes to my plants. :)


message 25: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Kate (K.C.) wrote: "Hee, thanks Cheryl! I'm a little crazy when it comes to my plants. :)"

Me too! When I was growing my seedlings in milk jugs last year I was out there checking them all the time. It's just so much fun to see those little green leaves poke through the soil.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) This brings to mind the time I went to a local nursery and brought home a bunch of flowers to plant and was later that night woken up by a terrible thunderstorm and I went dashing out into it, squealing with every flash of lightning and every clap of thunder to hurry and collect my new flowers and put them under the patio table so the torrential rain would dash them to pieces and I still cannot recall wearing more than my flip flops while doing so LMAO!!! (Thankfully it was the middle of the night with only lightning to light the back yard just in case I really was only wearing flip flops!!!!) So I too am a little crazy when it comes to my plants :-)


message 27: by Miriam (new)

Miriam I live next to a church. That would not be good to do!


message 29: by Miriam (new)

Miriam My hot tub that I exercise in, is in my garage, which was an old barn. It has windows. The windows have no curtains, yet. I don't bother with a suit, but I do make sure not to go there during church activities, because someone could look out the church balcony/nursery area and see me getting in! I really need to put up a curtain!


message 30: by K.C. (new)

K.C. Neal (kcneal) | 29 comments Miriam wrote: "My hot tub that I exercise in, is in my garage, which was an old barn. It has windows. The windows have no curtains, yet. I don't bother with a suit, but I do make sure not to go there during churc..."

Hee hee, that's awesome!! :)


Petra on semi-hiatus in sombrero-land (petra-x) Miriam wrote: "My hot tub that I exercise in, is in my garage, which was an old barn. It has windows. The windows have no curtains, yet. I don't bother with a suit, but I do make sure not to go there during churc..."

OMG just never forget :-)


message 32: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Someone would have to really try to see anything. It is quite a distance, and the windows are small and dirty. I suspect that they wouldn't be quite sure I wasn't wearing a light color suit. My suits, all three of them, rub under my arms when I am exercising. So I stopped wearing them. I am being lazy by not stapling up some old sheet or something over the window.


message 33: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) I'm growing onions, snap peas and lettuce (these are basically winter crops or overwinting crops in Texas). I've been harvesting the lettuce for the last month or so. The snap peas are coming in veeery slowly.

I have tomatoes and cucumbers as well, but the cucumbers get to wait inside for one more night because it might get down to 36 tonight!

After that it will be full steam ahead! My garden is about half the size of last year's garden. I just couldn't keep up with it all!


message 34: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Jo wrote: "This brings to mind the time I went to a local nursery and brought home a bunch of flowers to plant and was later that night woken up by a terrible thunderstorm and I went dashing out into it, sque..."

LMAO2!!!


message 35: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Miriam wrote: "My hot tub that I exercise in, is in my garage, which was an old barn. It has windows. The windows have no curtains, yet. I don't bother with a suit, but I do make sure not to go there during churc..."

LOL!!


message 37: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) And beets. I just picked the last two beets and put them in soup tonight. I had never grown them, but decided they'd make a nice winter crop so I grew a few. Very colorful and they really do make a nice addition to any soup.

We also had them in stir fried rice where my husband declared them "weird."

:>)


message 39: by Miriam (new)

Miriam I love beets. Grew a lot when I was in Idaho. Root crops did well in the sandy soil there, too. Canned them both plain and pickled, at least 50 pints each every year.


message 40: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) I didn't do a large amount. Probably 10.

This morning I have to go find cucumbers. I dropped the entire tray of seedlings I had started. Only one didn't snap completely in half...Woe is me. Big Woe is me.


message 41: by Miriam (new)

Miriam That sounds like something I would do! So much work down the drain!


message 42: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) Miriam wrote: "That sounds like something I would do! So much work down the drain!"

I know. I'm trying to NOT be depressed about it. They are *only* plants and can be replaced. But I'm still mad. I'm *such* an idiot.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) No you're not! Mis-haps in the garden happen to all of us annually!!!


message 44: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) SNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIFFLE. Now, I'm at the feeling sorry for myself stage. Sniff.


Bloomin’Chick (Jo) aka The Eclectic Spoonie (bloominchick) Well there's nothing wrong with that! You'll be okay as will your garden! Gardening is a very emotional as well as physical process.


message 46: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Maria wrote: "And beets. I just picked the last two beets and put them in soup tonight. I had never grown them, but decided they'd make a nice winter crop so I grew a few. Very colorful and they really do make..."

LOL. I've never thought to put them in soup, but I do love them cooked in salted water and severed with butter and salt and pepper.


message 47: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Maria wrote: "SNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIFFLE. Now, I'm at the feeling sorry for myself stage. Sniff."

Depending on where you live you might get by with direct seeding them right into the garden. I'm able to do that here in Minnesota and they have time to mature before fall.


message 48: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) Cheryl S. wrote: "Maria wrote: "SNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIFFLE. Now, I'm at the feeling sorry for myself stage. Sniff."

Depending on where you live you might get by with direct seeding them right into the garden. ..."


Thanks, I managed to find the spacemasters I wanted. When I seed in the ground, worms usually get the seedlings. I have brand new dirt, so I did put a couple of seeds out; we'll see how we do. The bugs and worms are rather large problem with starting seeds outdoors. I like to give them an extra chance by starting them indoors. That is to say they have an extra chance until I *drop* them...


message 49: by Cheryl S. (new)

Cheryl S. | 3501 comments Maria wrote: "Cheryl S. wrote: "Maria wrote: "SNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIFFLE. Now, I'm at the feeling sorry for myself stage. Sniff."

Depending on where you live you might get by with direct seeding them right i..."


LOL. Sorry about the bugs and worms too!


message 50: by Maria (new)

Maria Schneider (bearmountainbooks) Lettuce. MUCH lettuce. Enough lettuce for 20 salads I think. Tomatoes: 2 grape ones. And by the time I have enough tomatoes, I'll be out of lettuce!!!

Ever it goes in the land of Texas gardening.

I wonder if my neighbor knows how to use baby lettuce. Have you ever noticed that when you give produce to some people, if it doesn't look EXACTLY like the store kind, they don't want it???

I have a couple of neighbors like that. I have to go over why the lettuce is red (it's red romaine--never see it in the stores here) and wrinkled (the loose leaf doesn't really grow into a head like the store kind) and so on.

It's more trouble to give it away than to eat salads all day!!!


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