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Random Chit-Chat > Novels or Novella?

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message 1: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair Hi Everyone, a couple of friends and I were talking about this the other day and it was funny how people that preferred novels were not keen on novellas and the other way around. I was just wondering. Do you prefer a nice long novel or a short but sweet novella?


toria (vikz writes) (victoriavikzwrites) I know that I prefer a novella to a short story. However, when it comes to choosing between a novella and novel. I'd rather choose a book by the quality of the writing. But, a novella is easier to carry in a handbag. ;)


message 3: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair lol, at the moment I am leaning more towards novellas, but this is because the last few novels I have read were not good. The thing is I like to read a story through and when the book just doesn't grab me a novel becomes a mountain, lol. The last few novellas I have read were surprisingly good. Three weeks ago I would have been in the novel camp.


message 4: by June (new)

June Ahern (juneahern) | 67 comments I agree Vikz; when well-written, a novel, for travel, a novelette. Like Alex - I have enjoyed novelettes. It's somewhat like the Reader's Digest introduction to a novel where one has the "meat" of the story with a few frills; enough to wet the taste for we readers. Although now for travelers, it's the ereader, thus changed my books to include ebooks - still I like the feel of a printed book. The Skye in June


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments I read both, as long as they are well written I don't mind which I read. I have my own library of about a thousand unread books and 2 ereaders too and just read whatever I lay my hands on first! I am not picky these days what I read - I just like a good book!


message 6: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair lol, a thousand unread books! I want your library, lol.


message 7: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments I'm with Lynne, I like both and short stories too for that matter.


message 8: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair Hi Em, I like short stories too. I find them really hard to write!


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments Alex wrote: "lol, a thousand unread books! I want your library, lol."

You can visit anytime!


message 10: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments The thousand is just the unread ones right? Imagine the size of the entire collection - reckon Lynne will have a better array of books than most libraries!


message 11: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair lol, thank you for the kind offer. I use to have such a big library of books, but I have a large family and whenever they come around my library mysteriously gets one book smaller... and they are around alot!


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments It is a large collection of books Em, Several bookcases full! The majority of them are on the ground floor otherwise the floors might collapse! Lol!


message 13: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments That's a positive in my book Lynne, I'm very suspicious of people with no books....


toria (vikz writes) (victoriavikzwrites) Em wrote: "That's a positive in my book Lynne, I'm very suspicious of people with no books...."

same here


message 15: by Karen (new)

Karen | 54 comments Prefer a steady diet of novels-- with the occasional novella if I can't find anything "meatier". I avoid short stories like the plague; they just aren't detailed enough for me and usually seem to be poorly written/developed (unless from a great author like O Henry or Chekhov), imo.

"I'm very suspicious of people with no books...."

Likewise, Em. I am astonished when I meet someone who doesn't read because reading is as vital to me as breathing!!!


message 16: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 596 comments I'll generally read both as long as they're well written, although there are times when I finish a novella and just want more!

And I find people who don't read really bizarre, I just can't get my head around it. I'm sure it's not normal, I'd go stark raving mad if I didn't have a bit of a read at least a couple of times a day!


message 17: by Karen (new)

Karen | 54 comments LOL, Fiona!


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments Sam wrote: "I'll generally read both as long as they're well written, although there are times when I finish a novella and just want more!

And I find people who don't read really bizarre, I just can't get m..."


I feel the same about non readers. I don't know how people can say they don't/can't read books. I have been surounded by books from a baby and my kids have too. Could not live without them! Hence my library and tbr shelf!


message 19: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments Oh my goodness! I thought I was freakishly judgemental about people who don't read but seems I have company!!


message 20: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair I was speaking to someone a while ago on facebook. I was talking books and saying about writing and what I was reading.
'Do you read much?' I asked.
'Oh yes. I read all the time.'
'Have you read anything good?'
'Like a book?'
'Of course. What else would you read? lol' I replied.
'I don't read books.'
I frown at the computer screen. 'What do you read?'
'Magazines!'
My reply. 'Ah...' followed by. '...' and '...' with a few '???'

TRUE STORY!


message 21: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 596 comments They consider magazines reading?!?!?!?!?!? I don't mean to be judgemental or rude but still?!?!?!? I don't know what I would do if I didn't read (books), probably go crazy with boredom.

Like Lynne I grew up with many a crammed bookshelf, reading was just something we all did in my family whether it was all time classics or cheesy chick lit, books were always there (and thank god for that, I say)


message 22: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair I never use to read. I mean I did martial arts, football and all sorts of sports when I was in school. So I never read that much. I remember the first read book that got me interested was called "The Silver Sword" and is about world war two and a family trying to escape someplace. I didn't start reading for fun until I was about 17-18, which is kind of late for a writer I think. Now I am working my way through so many books. I like reading all sorts just to see how different people tell different stories.


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments Alex wrote: "I never use to read. I mean I did martial arts, football and all sorts of sports when I was in school. So I never read that much. I remember the first read book that got me interested was called "T..."

The Silver Sword was one of my favourites too we did it for English! I got a new copy when my kids came along and read it to them and they liked it too.


message 24: by Karen (new)

Karen | 54 comments "'I don't read books.'
I frown at the computer screen. 'What do you read?'
'Magazines!'
My reply. 'Ah...' followed by. '...' and '...' with a few '???'"


And they probably don't mean The New Yorker, the New York Review of Books, The New Republic or Scientific American (or whatever the British equivalent of those types of magazines are)!!!


message 25: by Karen (last edited Feb 24, 2011 08:05AM) (new)

Karen | 54 comments (gasp) ...Are we Goodreaders book snobs??


message 26: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 596 comments Nah, we're just want everyone to discover the joy of books like we have ;-D


message 27: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair I can live with being a snob. :P


message 28: by Ian, Moderator (new)

Ian (pepecan) | 5528 comments Mod
I'd rather they were reading magazines than reading nothing at all, though I suspect that "reading" in this context often just means looking at the pictures.


message 29: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments That's a good point, I agree that it's better to read magazines than nothing (I love magazines - especially Empire and Word since I'm into films and music as well as books!) Also I think we tend to take a certain level of literacy for granted. Not everybody is as confident when it comes to deciphering the written word and magazines may be a good means to overcome this.

It's just I know they're popular but I can't stand Heat and all those gossip mags and I imagine that's the ballpark we're in - I've scanned a few copies left in the staffroom at work and well, all those shots of celeb love handles etc. Puh...lease!


message 30: by Adrienne (new)

Adrienne | 265 comments Ok I'm late in here, but going back to original question I have to 'fess up that I'll reading anything, short shorts, shorts, novellas and novels. I choose what I re
ad depending on my mood and some short shorts are terrific. the whole story in just a few lines, obviously it depends on the skill of the writer but I know quite few authors who can pull these off really well....depending of course which genres you're into...
Moving on the next topic...magazines...quality mags and I don't put technical or educational mags in that groupare fine to read......pulp craps different and doesn't even qualify as a mag imo...like soaps on tv load of old s**t...andno I don't care who I offend LOL


message 31: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments and I feel much the same way about tabloid newspapers too!

Strictly speaking not novels or novellas or even short stories but does anyone ever read any poetry? I do on occasion read new poetry (new to me anyway) or re-visit old faves but seems to be signifcantly less popular...


message 32: by Adrienne (last edited Feb 26, 2011 03:02AM) (new)

Adrienne | 265 comments I read poetry but mostly on~line...I think it's very subjective though perhaps more so than stories. Poetry is good but only b/c it touches your soul and perhaps no one elses I dabble in writing Poems too:) but they all tens to be very melancholy

I agree with you about tabloids Ems:)))


message 33: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 596 comments I've dabbled a little in reading poetry and I find I either love a piece or hate it. Like Adrienne says it is very subjective and has to speak to you in some way, which you can't always put your finger on or explain.

I hate tabloids and gossip mags too, I can't bring myself to think of it as reading at all!


Lynne - The Book Squirrel (squirrelsend) | 3620 comments I too have dabbled in poetry and my dad had a lovely book of William Wordsworth poems which sadly mum got rid off when he died. I have since got a copy of his works but it just isn't the same as dad's old copy with lovely woodcuts.


message 35: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair I think poetry is one of the hardest things to write. I tried it and failed, lol.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Em wrote: "and I feel much the same way about tabloid newspapers too!

Strictly speaking not novels or novellas or even short stories but does anyone ever read any poetry? I do on occasion read new poetr..."


Hi Em
Reading Gerard Manley Hopkins at the moment. The thing with reading poetry is that you have to keep coming back to it to really appreciate it, I think. It's no good just trying to get through it as with novels!


message 37: by Em (new)

Em (emmap) | 2929 comments No, it's a very different experience from reading prose, more meditative and reflective.

Got to say, I haven't attempted writing since I was a teenager - I hated absolutely every poem I ever produced so have destroyed the evidence!


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Em wrote: "No, it's a very different experience from reading prose, more meditative and reflective.

Got to say, I haven't attempted writing since I was a teenager - I hated absolutely every poem I ever pr..."


I have some buried away somewhere- I wonder quite what I would make of it now if I came across it!


message 39: by Alex (new)

Alex Sinclair I think it is good to re-read old work. I found some novels I wrote at 16 and 17 and they were brilliant. It may be said that the story made no sense and didn't actually go anywhere and nothing much actually happened and you wanted to hit the characters on the head with a heavy object, but it was funny! I was surprised at the character interactions and some of the really weird and wonderful perspectives I told the story from. Like a lamp post light bulb flickering in and out of existence, as it contemplate life and death. Beneath it the main characters have a conversation. And another scene in a shoot out where the battle is told from the bullets point of view, as they fly by each other. You may ask... what was he smoking at the time? lol, but it is all good innocent imagination. I was happy I kept them all because I have used so many of these ideas in the novels I have coming out over the next year.


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