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message 1: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (last edited Feb 19, 2011 12:38AM) (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
What are some of you favourite foreign films?

Mine are:
Memiors of a teenage amnesiac (Japanese)
Tokyo boy (Japanese)
The eye (Chinese)
The Death note trilogy (Japanese)
The red shoes (Korean)
The girl who lept through time (Japanese)
Howl's moving Castle (Japanese)


message 2: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
ive seen two

i really liked life is beautiful (italian)
and
and they lived happily ever after was ok (french)


message 3: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
Oooo, what are they about?


message 4: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)


message 5: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) I have a ton of favorite foreign films. I'll skip the UK, Australia..etc - and just list films that are not in the English language.


4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2007) - Romanian
8½ (1963) - French
Amelie (2001) - French
A Very Long Engagement (2004) - French
A Woman is a Woman (1961) - French
Bicycle Thieves (1948) - Italian
Breathless (1960) - French
Contempt (1963) - French
Cinema Paradiso (1988) - Italian
City of God (2002) - Portuguese
Downfall (2004) - German
Eyes Without a Face (1960) - French
Fanny and Alexander (1982) - Swedish
Funny Games (1997) - German
Gervaise (1956) - French
Girl on the Bridge (1999) - French
Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (2009) - Swedish
Goodbye, Little Children (1987) - French
Jules and Jim (1962) - French
Juliet of the Spirits (1965) - Italian
Let the Right One In (2008) - Swedish
Life is Beautiful (1997) - French
Metropolis (1927) - German
Pandora's Box (1929) - German
Pan's Labyrinth (2006) - Spanish
Rashomon (1950) - Japanese
The 400 Blows (1959) - French
The Boat (1981) - German
The Devils (1955) - French
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) - French
The Lives of Others (2006) - German
The Motorcycle Diaries (2004) - Spanish
The Piano Teacher (2001) - French
The Red Balloon (1956) - French
The Red Violin (1998) - Various
The Road (1954) - Italian
The Seventh Seal (1957) - Swedish
The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) - Spanish
Tokyo Story (1953) - Japanese
Wild Strawberries (1957) - Swedish

.... This is all that I could think of at the moment. I put my absolute favorites in bold.


message 6: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
wow i dont know like any of them.


Queen Susan the Gentle (highqueensusanofcairparavel) | 967 comments You wanna know something? Neither do I.


message 8: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I also really liked let the right one in. I forgot about that one.


message 9: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
it looked. . . odd y did u like it?


message 10: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Yeah, I've seen Let the Right One In quite a few times. Its amazing. I havent gotten around to seeing the american version yet... but hopefully soon. I doubt it will be as good though. :)


message 11: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
ive heard it wasnt. why is it so amazing?


message 12: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I heard that it was pretty good, but I absolutely hate American remakes. I still haven't found a good one.


message 13: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
haha the tourist was an american remake!


message 14: by Baneen (new)

Baneen Slum dog Millionaire(Indian). It's a really nice movie.


message 15: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
i didnt like it. what was with the dance number at the end?


message 16: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) I usually hate American remakes as well Bronwyn2. Actually I usually dislike remakes period. I was so upset when I heard they were going to remake Let the Right One In... and only a year after the swedish version. But the trailer looks pretty decent. So I figured Id give it a shot.


message 17: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I wasn't to happy about it either, but I'm happy they didn't age the charactors' like they do with some remakes/book adaptions. I am a big fan of both Chloe Moretz and Kodi Smit-McPhee, so hopefully they wont let us down.

I am also really annoyed about the Girl with the dragon tatto remake. I haven't seen the original yet, but I loved the books.


message 18: by Baneen (new)

Baneen Bronwyn (B1/Mrs. Johnny Depp) wrote: "i didnt like it. what was with the dance number at the end?"

That's the way Indian movies are.


message 19: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
really? all indian movies have a dance number at the end?


message 20: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Bronwyn ((B2/B.P)) wrote: "I am also really annoyed about the Girl with the dragon tatto remake. I haven't seen the original yet, but I loved the books."

I'm actually surprisingly thrilled about The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo remake. I love the books and really enjoyed the Swedish versions of the films. I just have a feeling that this will be a good film too. Plus, I really love the casting choices. :)


message 21: by Baneen (new)

Baneen Bronwyn (B1/Mrs. Johnny Depp) wrote: "really? all indian movies have a dance number at the end?"

lol, no. i meant they just put songs anywhere in the movie they want. mostly during romantic scenes.


message 22: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
that is odd lol


message 23: by Baneen (new)

Baneen :)


message 24: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I haven't seen anyone from the American remake in anything else, so I can't really say wether I like them or not. It just annoys me that they have to make a remake not that long after the original was relesed.

I recently watch this really good Japanase mvoie called Always: Sunset on third.


message 25: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I saw Let Me In the other day. It was way better than I expected. To date it is the best American remake I've seen. It stuck to the original very well, and there were only a few scenes that were drasticly changed.


message 26: by Bronwyn , has fallen for Anderson Cooper!!! (new)

Bronwyn  (naturallyredandright) | 2192 comments Mod
oh well then i am very happy for you


message 27: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I also hear the Pulse is a good remake, I'm looking forward to watching it.


message 28: by Sloan (last edited Mar 10, 2011 03:21AM) (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Bronwyn ((B2/B.P)) wrote: "I saw Let Me In the other day. It was way better than I expected. To date it is the best American remake I've seen. It stuck to the original very well, and there were only a few scenes that were dr..."

I just recently saw it also, but unlike you I was dissappointed. I dont know why, but it just didnt do it for me. On the other hand, I really liked the casting. Some good choices there. I'd give it a 6/10. Enjoyable but no where near the original.

Have you ever read the book Bronwyn(B2)?


message 29: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I love the actors that play Abby and Owen. they really pulled off the part. I also liked the director, I don't think very many other directors could have done such a good job with it.

I started reading a little while ago, but I had heaps of other books I wanted to read, so I put it down for a while, I still haven't finished it. Have you?


message 30: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Bronwyn ((B2/B.P)) wrote: "I started reading a little while ago, but I had heaps of other books I wanted to read, so I put it down for a while, I still haven't finished it. Have you? ..."

Sadly no. I have wanted to for a very long time though. But like you, there are just too many books!


message 31: by Ian (last edited Mar 13, 2011 11:07AM) (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments Some of my favorite foreign films, off the top of my head. (Although technically I watch so few US and English-language films, I regard Hollywood as 'foreign.':) I tend to watch one or two movies a day, using a vid projector - so I'm constantly pouring in movies...
Dogtooth (Greek)
Turtles Can Fly (Iraq)
Blackboards (Iran)
Old Boy (Korean)
Infernal Affairs 1 & 2 (Hong Kong) (Scorcese ripped them off to make 'The Departed' urgh.
Bungee Jumping of Their Own (Korean)
Joint Security Area (Korean)
Welcome to Dongmakgol (Korean)
...ing (Korean)
My Sassy Girl (Korean)
A Tale of Two Sisters(Korean)
Sonatine (Japanese)
Brothers ( Japanese)
Audition (Japanese)
Fireworks (Japanese)
Dolls (Japanese)
Shower (China)
Bird People of China (Japanese)
The Human Condition 1/2/3 (Japanese)
Samurai Trilogy (Japanese)
Tampopo (Japanese)
Unlucky Monkey (Japanese)
Dangaan Runner (Japanese)
City of Violence(Korean)
The Last Wave (Australia)
Picnic at Hanging Rock (Australia)
The Free Will (German)
The Lives of Others (German)
Dog Days (German)
Enlightenment Guaranteed (German)
The Baader Meinhof Komplex (German)
Mesrine (French)
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (actually all Bunuel's films)
Best of Youth (Italian)
Perfect Day (Italian)
1900 (Italian)
Satantango (Hungarian)
Porno Star (Japanese)
Spirit of the Beehive (Spanish)
Felicidades (sp?) (Argentine)
The Frog Child (Argentine)
Bad Guy (Korean)
(the list just keeps on growing, haven't even started scraping the surface - I'll stop for now :)


message 32: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
Wow that's a great list! There are heaps on there that I want to watch :))


message 33: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments I tend to work on the idea that there's two types of films: Great Film, and Great Film That's Fun To Watch :)
I stick with the latter. A lot of the allegedly 'great' movies can put one to sleep. I like quirky films where there's a definite sense of fun - even if the topic and concept is deadly serious.


message 34: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I totaly agree with you! A lot of the movies now days that are "the best movies ever" eg. Avatar, Inception, The social network but I find them boring and unoriginal. I love quirky movies, just as long as they don't borderline on stupid.


message 35: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments Well, Hollywood has reduced films to formula - where 'X' has to happen by this point, and 'Y' must occur over there - and what's left is entirely predictable stories where everything's visible.
Most US film are roughly ten minutes of 'real' story stretched to 90 minutes and you can see exactly where everything's going, give or take a wiggle or two. Not fun at all.
The Asian films are more genre-blurring - where sometimes you don't know if you're watching a comedy or a drama, something light or deeply moving - they switch back and forth during the story. Stuff like 'Old Boy' is a good example, or 'Bad Guy' - which shows up another element of Asian (and EU) films: a lack of morality.
In Hollywood films generally, there're the 'good' people and the 'bad' people - and mostly good wins, although sometimes the baddies do. In a lot of Asian film, there's no covert morality tale being told. Sometimes there great stories about 'bad' people. If you can find it, 'Bad Guy' is a brutally brilliant film. But there again, so is this year's Oscar nominated foreign film 'Dogtooth' - never seen anything so conceptually creepy and yet so low budget. Makes David Lynch look lame in comparison.
I suppose what I'm saying is there's a 'depth' to a lot of foreign film that makes them as rewarding a books, whereas most of the US product is more like a flimsy comic book - bright colors, technically well-made, but you flip through it and it doesn't rock your world... Was watching a period Finnish movie set in the 16th century - called 'Sauna' - following an expedition establishing the border with Russia. I don't want to give anything away, but damn - subtle film filled with dread. Characters wracked with guilt over their prior behavior in war. Then I try watching Battle: Los Angeles and eventually fall asleep, as its like a video game, filled with gung ho 'very happy to die' marines. *shudders* There's not much reality in US film - except for little gems like Wendy and Lucy or Winter's Bone (which really should have won the Oscar rather than the soft porno Portman vehicle) If you want a glimpse of reality, Winter's Bone has it. It doesn't take big budgets to make beautiful movies - just great stories...
/rambling geek mode off :)


message 36: by Sloan (last edited Mar 15, 2011 08:10AM) (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Ian wrote: "Some of my favorite foreign films, off the top of my head. (Although technically I watch so few US and English-language films, I regard Hollywood as 'foreign.':) I tend to watch one or two movies a..."

WOW!... and I thought I watched a lot of foreign films! Most of those I havent even heard of. There are only 2 that I have even seen, The Lives of Others and The Spirit of the Beehive, which are favorites of mine. I'll have to look into the rest you listed. :)


message 37: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments Spirit of the Beehive is something gorgeous - pitch perfect film making. There're a couple of French/Canadian films that have that similar 'quietness' to them - and also deal with childhood from unexpected perspectives, although nothing comes close to 'Beehive.' One that comes to mind is 'C'est pas moi, je le jure!' (It wasn't Me, I Swear' (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1163752/ ) Another, is the strange film 'Erendira' - which comes from a Gabriel Marquez story...
re 'The Lives of Others' - if you want to see truly frightening film making out of Germany, 'The Free Will' is something extraordinary. Its tough to watch though, it deals with a rapist and his struggles to reform himself. Very adult plot. The other German one I mentioned 'Enlightenment Guaranteed' is the other extreme - a funny great story about a couple of Germans lost in Japan, in Tokyo, trying to find some Zen monastery to meditate at. Another German one that I just recalled, is a beautiful one called 'Cherry Blossoms'( http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0910559/ ) about an old German widower in Japan mourning his late wife, and meeting up with a young near-homeless Japanese girl with a totally different worldview. That's another quiet modern classic in my view...
Heh, sorry to be rambling - but there's a world of very fascinating films out there :)


message 38: by Sloan (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Ian wrote: "Spirit of the Beehive is something gorgeous - pitch perfect film making. There're a couple of French/Canadian films that have that similar 'quietness' to them - and also deal with childhood from un..."

Nah, dont worry about rambling! I dont mind at all! Trust me, I go on & on about films all the time, to people who dont even care. So it's nice to talk about good films with someone just as passionate about them. Plus, this is a place to do just that.

Thanks for all the recommendations!! They all sound like movies I would enjoy. Right up my alley.. so to speak. I'm usually more of a classic film fan (anything before the 1970's I prefer). So its nice to have so many "modern/foreign" films to check out. :)


message 39: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments I like pre-70's films myself - although in that period, I veer towards the 'giallo' Italian schlock genre :) Actually all eras of film are up for grabs with me, from the old silents onward. Always looking for a good story that makes me forget I'm watching a movie.
One thing I don't like about many of the pre-70's films is just how much film time is spent watching people travel from A - B. Characters are always walking out of somewhere, going downstairs, walking along a sidewalk, getting into car, driving through traffic... One forgets how fast the pace is these days with quicker storytelling/editing - getting people from place to place faster. It seemed to be something peculiar to the 60's movies. 50's films on the other hand, usually don't suffer from that 'watching the main character drive somewhere' problem :) That said, I don't mind it when the director knows what they're doing - thinking of guys like Antonioni with his long takes in Blow Up...


message 40: by Sloan (last edited Mar 15, 2011 11:49AM) (new)

Sloan (ofliliesandremains) Ian wrote: "I like pre-70's films myself - although in that period, I veer towards the 'giallo' Italian schlock genre :) Actually all eras of film are up for grabs with me, from the old silents onward. Always ..."

I'm the same way, any decade of film is good with me. I like exploring them all. Each one has something different to offer. But, I do prefer the good old classics/silents. There are a few modern day directors that I keep a good eye on and follow their work. Its just so hard finding good movies these days, when there is so much blockbuster trash to sort through. There is nothing I hate more than the summer season for film... nothing interesting in the cinemas, but they still rake in the money, dont they.

I never really thought about the whole traveling thing taking up so much time before... you have a good point! There are many Cary Grant scenes going through my mind at the moment which fit just what you mentioned. A lot of car scenes in particular. Haha!

It's funny that you brought up the film, Blow Up... its just about my favorite film!! It comes right after The 400 Blows, which is my all time. You really know your film, dont you!? You're like a film encylopedia. All this knowledge/history/passion just pours out of you. I feel like a student, when I'm usually the teacher. I dont know too many other film fans, so that explains why I've felt superior in the past. Heehee. :)


message 41: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments re finding good movies, thats kind of why I ended up with so many of the Korean, Chinese, and Japanese films - because they'd be brilliant stories, beautifully shot, and totally unpredictable. Often, the 'genre blurring' makes Asian film riveting cinema.
But each part of Asia delivers a different type of film experience. Comedy is the hardest one to try cross borders with - and usually Asian comedies don't travel well. Some do, like 'Tampopo' - which is this great film about 'eating habits and noodles' and about a woman being trained to start a noodle shop. Its hard to explain :) Or for something with a gorgeous LA Story feel there's 'Fly Me to Polaris'
But if you love movies and, for instance, havent seen any Takeshi Kitano films (Sonatine, Dolls, Brother etc) you'll appreciate the 'silences' in the films and the use of textures. Kitano uses the 'gangster' genre to tell his stories, but they're often anything but regular Mob movies. Think Cronenberg meets Scorsese. Lots of beauty and brutality combined. A totally different take on reality to western cinema. Another more crazy film maker is Takeshi Miike - a good intro to his work is 'Audition' - a very frightening film and great storytelling. Its not technically a horror film, but it has a punch to it that's breathtaking. He (Miike) is like a Japanese David Lynch, but he's very hit and miss.
China also has lovely movies - one I saw recently was called 'Cow' - and its a poignant mixture of styles, about this poor peasant trying to keep this damn cow alive in a village where everyone else has been massacred. The story unfolds in flashbacks. Another recent one was 'After Shock' - deals with an earthquake and the separation of a kid from her family and follows the unknowing paths of former and new family as they cross...(like an oldie 'Bolero')
Switching continents, another recent one I saw was Argentinian: 'El Aura' - an amazing film noir about an epileptic taxidermist who ends up embroiled in a real heist. Think Coen Brothers 'Blood Simple' meets something else entirely...
And meanwhile, back in the darn USA, not much happened :) Although I did see a pretty nice Robert Duval film called 'Get Low' - which is a period piece and really good, if you're into thoughtful cinema.
re feeling superior, no, I have the geek's passion for good films - I suppose also because although I write, I don't really draw inspiration from other people's books, I get it from cinema - so that's kind of my creative well that I drink from...


message 42: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
At the moment I'm going through a massive Asia faze here are the ones I've seen so far:
Death note: 1, 2 and 3(Japanese)
Memiors of a teenage amnesiac (Japanese)
Tokyo boy (Japanese)
The eye 1 & 2 (Hong Kong)
The red shoes (Korean)
The girl who lept through time (Japanese)
Howl's moving Castle (Japanese)
Spirited Away (Japanese)
Whispers of the heart (Japanese)
The Cat Returns (Japanese)
Ponyo (Japanese)
The great Yokai war (Japanese)
Monkey Magic (Japanese)
The host (Korean)
Infernal Affairs 1&2 (Hong Kong)
Princess Blade (Japanese)
Pulse (Japanese)
Hero (Chinese)
Au revoir, Teipei (Thai)
A tale of two sisters (Korean)
and I just got out Haeundae (Korean) and Cure (Hong Kong- I think). They should be good :))

Korean would have to be my favourite country for movies, but as you can see I haven't really seen all theat many Korean movies but I am currently addicted to a Korean tv show called Boys over flowers. It's a comedy but at times it totaly does a 180, and became really serious I doubt any American TV shows could do that with out being all over the shop.
I've read the book Audition but I really didn't like it, it just wasn't my cup of tea, but I still want to watch the movie, I have heard many good things about it. I also really want to watch the original Grudge and Ring, I acctualy enjoyed the American versions and I would love to see how they compaire to the original.


message 43: by Ian (last edited Mar 17, 2011 04:55AM) (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments I don't know Boys Over Flowers - but re that 180 degree thing - yeah, I call it 'genre blurring' - its hard to describe but its brilliant when its happening. I totally fell for two other K-TV series 'Pasta' and 'Painter in the Wind.' Pasta got me cooking again :)

re 'Great Yokai War' - that, if memory serves me was a Miike film (I might be wrong) it was lots of fun. re Girl Who Leapt Through Time - only recently saw the live action version. I know there's an animated one as well. Kind of like 'Grave of the Fireflies' if you know it - both an animated and live action version are out there. Death Note 1 I liked, two not so much. Kind of like Twins Effect 1 vs 2, if you know the movies. (I can tell by the titles you're into your horror movies :) You should have a look at 'One Missed Call,' or Sicily 2km... trying to think of more 'pure' horror. 'Audition' really has to be seen to be experienced properly. If you like Studio Ghibli (sp?) work - then Princess Mononoke is another must see, also a strange three or four stories in one film called 'Memories.' Oh, another classic = 'Battle Royale'. Hopefully they won't try remake it here. Naughty schoolkids stuck on an island, with explosive collars around their necks - last one left standing, 'wins.'
The Host was great. I didn't go to much for Princess Blade - thought the title was better than the film. There's a series of modern 'samurai' films that are very delicately made. 'Twilight Samurai' is one of them, and 'After the Rain' is another - if its your genre you should have a look at them. For pure wonderful cheesey film (sword+zombie) there's the classic 'Versus'. 'Wild Zero' is another odd one - sort of like a Japanese 'Repo Man'. Also 'Azumi' - for the cutest samurai warrior ever. (The sequel wasn't as much fun.
If you liked Hero, you should look around for the two-film epic saga Red Cliff, major period warfare.
Okay, that's as far as my brain can think right now (still waking up :)


message 44: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
Yea, it was a Miike film though I didn't really like it, it was too weird for my tastes. There's a live actions version? Is it any good? I saw the animated version, and I was compleatly blown away by it. I've also only seen the animated version of Grave of the Fireflies. I liked the first two Death Notes, but not the third one. It strayed to far from the first two. I just looked up Twin Effect, they look really good, thanks for the suggestion :)) I have acctually seen One missed call, Princess Monoke and Always: Sunset on third but they totaly slipped my mind when I writing my list up. I didn't mind One Missed Call, though I thought that the ending dragged out too much. Have you seen the other two?
There are a couple of other Studio Ghibli movies I have wanted to watch for a while: Kiki's Deleviry service, Castle in the sky and My neighbough Totoro. I bought the book of Battle Royal a couple of weeks ago, I should be getiing it early next week. I've been wanting to watch it for a while.
I don't mind Samurai movies, just as long as the fight scenes aren't too unrealistic. Thanks for the recamendations they all look really good expetially Wild Zero and Azumi.
I've seen Red Cliff sitting on the shelf at my library, I think I will get it out next time I go there. Have you seen Crouch tiger, Hidden Dragon and House of Flying daggers? I'm pretty sure they're done by the same person that did Hero, I'm thinking about watching them aswell.


message 45: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments starting back to front. re Miike and live-action version - you're talking of 'Great Yodai War'? In which case I have to say i didnt know there was an animated version too.
Crouching Tiger/Hidden Dragon & House of flying daggers - both are stunning pieces of film. Really beautiful to look at.
re the book of Battle Royale - try see the film first - because the book, I think was written (badly) by someone from the script. Tried reading the book and it was just a mess. The film lays it all out and gets on with 'the game' the kids are involved in (think 'Lord of the Flies' meets 'A Clockwork Orange') The film is jaw-droppingly evil at times, but great violent fun. Its very visual.
I've only seen the live action 'Girl Who Slipped Through Time' - thought it was sweet and much fun. Haven't seen a lot of the other Studio Ghibli titles - with animation, I often have to force myself to watch it. (Unless its something real special - like the Italian deliberate ripoff of Fantasia called 'Allegro Non Troppo' (something really different). That said, another Asian anime I kind of liked was 'Paprika' - as well as the usual 'Akira' (which is one of the classics of big budget anime.
Re samurai movies and fight scenes being realistic - that's why I suggested 'Twilight samurai' and 'After the Rain' two post-modern looks at the genre, going in close on what it actually meant to be a samurai at the time. Another one to look at is Takeshi Kitano's tribute to the whole 'blind swordsman' movies, its called Zatoichi, and stars Kitano himself. Its worth seeing as another good example of the samurai genre in action.
That said, Kurosawa's films are pretty realistic when fight scenes occur. Azumi on the other hand is just fun. Like 'Kung Fu Hustle' for instance, or the fun 'Arahan' which turns the urban landscape into a martial arts warzone - like, if memory serves me right Tsui Hark's 'Time and Tide' which does it more seriously.
re Twins Effect, I thought the first one was great, but the second, ew.
if you like Time travel concepts, there's a Korean film called various names including 'Cyborg Girl' - this is NOT the same film as 'I'm a Cyborg And Its Okay'(which is a different, not as much fun sort of movie).
re sequels, I always figure its the law of diminishing returns in action. So the first film will be great, the next, less so, and a third, even worse...
/ramble mode off :) (I have a cold, so brain is a little bleary)


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

wow u write alot!!!!!!!!!!!!!


message 47: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
I didn't really like the Grat Yokai war, but I would like to give the director another go. I particularly like the looks of Audition and Ichi the killer.
Have you seen Shadowless sword? I just saw the trailer for it, and I thought that it had the same sort of style as Crouching tiger, hidden dragon, house of flying daggers and Hero.
Thanks for the tip, I think I will get it out over the weekend. Is the second one worth watching? Does it have anything to do with the book, or is it a stand alone movie?
I love Studio Ghibli movies, they're way better than the stuff America has been producing latly. I think they are incredibly cute, expectially Ponyo, but that's probably just a chick thing. I watched some of Akira when it was on TV a while ago, but it wasn't really my thing, I'm not a big Sci-Fi fan. Do you watch any anime TV shows?
Wow, you have seen alot of Samuri movies! Thanks for the recamendatons.
I want to see both Cyborg girl and I'm a cyborg, but that's okay, they both seem right up my ally.
There are a couple of American francise movies that get better as they go one eg: The resident evil movies.
I just saw Oldboy and Brotherhood, and I loved them both. Oldboy was such an intese film, and I didn't see what the end twist was going to be! Now I really want to see the other two films in the triliogy. Have you seen them?


message 48: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments the thing with Miike, as I said, is that he's very 'hit and miss' - some films are lovely, others are awful. He experiments all the time. he's made probably at least 60+ films - so you could spend all your time trying to wade through his output alone. 'Audition' and 'Bird people of China' are probably his most 'normal' and a good introduction to him. It'll make you forgive his other messier films. 'Ichi the Killer' is just crazy violent fun, and Visitor Q will need a strong stomach, for instance...
re Shadowless sword - dont know that title, I'm afraid...
Not sure which one you're asking about re 'does it have anything to do with the book' - might it be Battle Royale? If so, just watch the first one. Its lovely stuff, by a great old director Kinji Fukasaku - (he made an amazing four or five film series referred to as 'the Yakuza Papers' - which start in the ashes of WWII and go forward to the 70's - a sequential series of films that totally outdo the Godfather for complex Mob story...so Battle Royale was an odd interesting choice for him.
re watching anime TV shows, not really, I saw the whole of... heh, I've blanked on the series name. Set in space beside a portal. Darn it, brain failed me. Very noir. Generally though I stick with cinema - as there's too much TV product. I'm after stories that can be told in cinematic ways, regardless of length. Just finished watching oldie Japanese 3 part film called 'The Human Condition' - a little dated, but still good - its 9.5 hours in total - a kind of meditation on life, honor and pacifism. Also watched 'Best of Youth' an amazing Italian 6hr movie that's kind of a love story. These sort of stories don't make it to the US coz it ruins the scheduling in the multiplex when films are too long.
Old Boy is great. That one take hammer fight scene is jaw dropping - by 'the other two films in trilogy' you mean the two 'Sympathy' films? I'd go with Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, and stop there. The other one is a little tacky and lacks the power of the first. You mention 'Brotherhood' - is that Tae Guki? (sp? 'Brotherhood of War' - about the brothers in the Korean War? If so its a great film - and you should see the very gentle and beautiful 'Welcome to Dongmakgol' - to get another story also set within the same Korean War but coming from a totally different place entirely... /ramble mode off :)


message 49: by Bryn ((B2/B.P)) , Mrs Pettyfer (new)

Bryn ((B2/B.P))   Ryeosomniac~~ (Heesica) | 1703 comments Mod
So are most of his films as weird as The Great Yokai war? I don't tbink I could handle Visitor Q. Another one I really want to watch is Yatterman I just got the bird people in China out, I can't wait to watch it. I also got In the mood for love and 2046. I'm a big Tony Leung fan.
Yeah, does the second Battle Royale have anything to do with the book, it is quite a large book so did they split it in two like the Harry Potter films? I don't think I've seen anything directed by him, but I will have to check out some of his other movies.
Anime TV shows is what started me out on Asian films, the first TV show I saw was Beck: Mongolian Chop Squad, after that came Death Note, Fruits Basket and Pretear. There is no way I could sit for six hours and watch a film, I struggle with a two and a half hour film, though I do like the sounds of Best of Youth.
Yeah, the director did an amazing job with the Hammer scene. I can't wait to see the directors other movie Thirst and I'm a cyborg, but that's okay, though I am quite annoyed that he has decided to direct an American movie, starting Nicole Kidman (One of my lest favourite actresses). Yeah, here in Austraila it's just called Brotherhood. There is a similer movie Danish movie called Brothers that I also really want to watch. I just recently watched Heaundae (Korea) Cure (Japan) and In the mood for love (Chinese) and I bought a double DVD pack with Cyborg girl and My Sassy Girl off the internet so it should take a couple of weeks to get here.


message 50: by Ian (new)

Ian Fraser | 14 comments 'Thirst' is kind of silly - that's the priest/vampire one, right? Some nice moments but over all quite flimsy as a movie. I think, given how conservative Korea is, religion-wise, it probably worked better there. Reminds me, don't recall if I've mentioned it, but 'Secret Sunshine' is a worthwhile hardcore drama - speaking of religion/Korea. As for 'I'm a cyborg but thats okay' - I found it very tricksy - like the director had seen 12 Monkeys and was riffing on some of it. It might have just caught me at the wrong time. But 'Cyborg Girl' and 'My Sassy Girl' will be a great double feature. 'In the mood for love' is elegant and fun - but 2046 totally lost me. The director is a bit like some of Edward Yang's films (Yi Yi and Brighter Summers Day) where not a lot happens and you have to be in the mood to observe a story unfold at its own pace.
re sitting for 6 hrs - well, you don't really. You get lost in the story and then, what I tend to do is break halfway and watch the second half the next night. I think Best of Youth I did over three nights.
The 3 x 3.5 hr films that make up 'The Human Condition' I also broke up over multiple nights.
It reminds me of a great series of cheesy HK movies, collectively called The Young and the Dangerous - charting the rise of some schoolfriends into becoming mobsters - I think there's 6 or 7 movies in total. That took a week to get through :)
re Battle Royale 2 and the book, I don't think so. Its a bit of a mess, as the director died midway - and the histrionics get a bit much. The first film is lean and mean. re his other films - most are slightly dated, but if you like Japanese 'mob' films' they're a lot of fun. Especially as I mentioned, the four or five sequential film set known as 'Yakuza Papers.'
re Takashi Miike and weirdness. Well, yes. He's known as a kind of social agitator. He leaps into subjects that others wouldnt. Or else he takes normal 'genre' mob movies and adds a twist, like Fudoh Next Generation' is schoolkid mobsters (and there's a use of a blowdart in a way that I'm not going to describe)
Some of his films he shoots on celluloid, others on video. So you never know what you're going to get - so he's hard to dismiss entirely, after having seen something lousy from him, because he has just a huge body of work. 'Gozu' is another strangely Lynch-like film of his that goes insane near the end. But 'Bird people' and 'Audition' are a good intro. For sheer class though, those titles I mentioned by Takeshi Kitano bear looking at.
For older subtle cinema, there was a film maker called Ozu, to see a quiet level of modern film making in the 1950's and then compare it to what the West was putting out at the same time - he's best known for 'Tokyo Story' but the one I like of his is called Ohayu ('Good morning') showing the effects of modernization on Japan. Very simple film making and story telling. Like some of the Kurosawa titles, one expects deep, complex plodding cinema - and instead you're shown this ostensibly light little story. There's nothing harder to make than 'simple stories.'
-re Danish, you've seen Flame and Citroen? the WWII thing. Went through a series of Nordic films recently. Lapland Odyssey - a Japanese guy doing a road trip through Iceland. Very Jim Jarmusch.
Okay, too much rambling. I'll stop now.


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