We Love Lisa Kleypas discussion

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message 1: by Lisa Kay (last edited Feb 17, 2011 08:33PM) (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Lisa Kleypas talked about ‘magical realism’ in one of her interviews about Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor. It's definition at Wikipedia is as follows:

Magic realism or magical realism is an aesthetic style or genre of fiction in which magical elements are blended into a realistic atmosphere in order to access a deeper understanding of reality. These magical elements are explained like normal occurrences that are presented in a straightforward manner which allows the "real" and the "fantastic" to be accepted in the same stream of thought. It is a literary and visual art genre; creative fields that exhibit less significant signs of magic realism include film and music.


I was so interested I made a bookshelf and reviewed my books (including TBR). These are what I added on that shelf.

Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach The Listener by Taylor Caldwell Life of Pi by Yann Martel Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez The Witch and the Warrior (Warriors, #2) by Karyn Monk

I would be very interested in what others have shelved. Thanks.

P.S. Hope this is the right place to post.


message 2: by D.G. (last edited Feb 18, 2011 03:58AM) (new)

D.G. Other magical realism books:
Like Water for Chocolate A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies by Laura Esquivel The Girl Who Chased the Moon by Sarah Addison Allen The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

I didn't see ANY magical realism in Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor. I mean, they talk about magic but in the context of what's real and what's not and that definitely doesn't fit the definition above.

Maybe she means the rest of the series to fit the genre?

I wouldn't say that Life of Pi is magical realism. May seem from the description but it's not. :)


message 3: by MashJ (last edited Feb 18, 2011 05:25AM) (new)

MashJ | 733 comments Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Laura Esquivel
Isabel Allende (some of her work)
Louis de Bernieres
you don't have to be South American- but it helps!

I see that Salman Rushdie is also on the listopia list and I can see how he would qualify although I've never managed to finish one of his books. Also maybe Umberto Eco (at least I finished The Name of the Rose!).

I very much enjoy this genre (especially compared to the dreary reality of existentialism). There is a listopia here: http://www.goodreads.com/list/show/14...

I agree with you DG- I really don't think that LK was even close with Christmas Eve at Friday Harbour- I think it needs an element of the fantastical and she didn't get there.

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende Captain Corelli's Mandolin by Louis de Bernières The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts by Louis de Bernières One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez


message 4: by Lisa Kay (last edited Feb 18, 2011 10:33AM) (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Yes, I do think Kleypas 'blew a kiss toward' magical realism in Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor in the first toy store scene (an enchanted place for everyone) (view spoiler) It brought a smile to my lips. There a lot of other subtle things. The majority of the book takes place on an island, evocative of an exotic locale. The smooth, warm taste of roasted coffee Mark has made from his own labors. Sam valiantly works the soil while tending his vineyards, with a Victorian house - often a time period for magical realism - in the background. And Alex desperately needs some sort of mystical intervention. The magic of the season (both Halloween and Christmas). The letter to Santa.

But most of all, we all know this is a HEA novella, so there is a sensual aura of exploration and driving force of destiny whenever Mark and Maggie interact. Yes, LK just gave a tiny nod to the genre, but it was well done and done so sweetly.

Thanks Mshj for the GR link to Favorite Magical Realism Novels! I looked for it yesterday and didn't find it. I guess I needed to type in the exact title. I did check off some more books, both read to TBR.


message 5: by Autumn (last edited Feb 20, 2011 11:36AM) (new)

Autumn   (sweetdenial) | 1625 comments Mshj wrote: "Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Laura Esquivel
Isabel Allende (some of her work)
Louis de Bernieres
you don't have to be South American- but it helps!"


oh Mshj! what GREAT list!! Garcia Marquez is on my top ten favorite authors.His narrative skills are off the charts IMO.


Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez is another favorite of mine!!


message 6: by MashJ (last edited Feb 20, 2011 03:02PM) (new)

MashJ | 733 comments LisaKay wrote: "But most of all, we all know this is a HEA novella, so there is a sensual aura of exploration and driving force of destiny whenever Mark and Maggie interact. Yes, LK just gave a tiny nod to the genre, but it was well done and done so sweetly.

I would be inclined to say that that is more of a philosophical point than a reflection of the MR genre. MR is a wide church I agree but I think that maybe if in LK's book the magic had been real or some more off the wall things had happened she would have got closer. She was probably afraid of alienating her established readership- however as I didn't really like CEAFH I'm probably not the best to judge.

It's a wonderful genre to explore-very diverse-but with an element of layering of the real world and the unreal that is very enjoyable to an escapist reader like me. I found the list by the way by clicking on the explore tab and then using the submenu to get onto listopia- typing in "magic realism" then brought up the list.

Autumn- Love in the Time of Cholera is one of my top 5 books so it's pretty embarassing that I haven't read all of GGM's work. It's nice to find another fan.


message 7: by Lisa Kay (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Thanks Mshj. Personally, I loved CEAFH and have read it repeatedly. To each her own.


message 8: by UniquelyMoi ~ BlithelyBookish, Your Humble Servant (new)

UniquelyMoi ~ BlithelyBookish | 8001 comments Lisa Kay wrote: "Thanks Mshj. Personally, I loved CEAFH and have read it repeatedly. To each her own."

I really enjoyed it, too. Sometimes we need a lighter, feel good read to fill the time, and this one was perfect. I anticipate the next books will be a tad deeper, Christmas Eve was a great way to kick off the series.


message 9: by Heidi (new)

Heidi | 871 comments My cousin si going on a cruise in a week and has never read romance. I lent her Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor (Friday Harbor, #1) by Lisa Kleypas to read along with Sugar Daddy (Travises, #1) by Lisa Kleypas ....I told her she couldn't go wrong with LK. I think she will really enjoy Christmas Eve and its will "break her in" for Sugar Daddy since it's a litte lighter in the smut area!


message 10: by MashJ (new)

MashJ | 733 comments this discussion (especially the linked listopias) inspired me to pick up some more MR books and broaden my reading a bit.


message 11: by Lisa Kay (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Mshj wrote: "this discussion (especially the linked listopias) inspired me to pick up some more MR books and broaden my reading a bit."

I would like to do that too. I think I'll start with Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen , so I reserved it at the library.


message 12: by MashJ (last edited Apr 04, 2011 12:10PM) (new)

MashJ | 733 comments Lisa Kay wrote: "Mshj wrote: "this discussion (especially the linked listopias) inspired me to pick up some more MR books and broaden my reading a bit."

I would like to do that too. I think I'll start with [boo..."


I read this over the weekend- rough weekend for me clearing out my Dad's house and this was a great pleasure to break the time with. I think that it was in the magic realism genre although it didn't have the toughness of some of the real masters. Was it chick lit? I don't know- I don't usually like chick lit and I enjoyed this- if any thing it was more of a feelgood novel. I also found the setting in the Amercian South very interesting. Now it's not somewhere I've visited but on reading this book I had images coming through my mind of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (love that film), Steel Magnolias and Driving Miss Daisy. It could well be the matriachal nature of the book. Anyhow it was a lot of fun and I'd recommend it to anyone who'd like a "lift".

[book:Garden Spells|1158967]


message 13: by Lisa Kay (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Mshj, I finally just went ahead and purchased Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen and incorporated it into one of my challenges for Spring. So, it is "on-deck".


message 14: by Fiona (last edited Apr 04, 2011 04:50PM) (new)

Fiona Goodman I think writers from Latin America are sensational at writing books based around magical realism. I wonder if it is because of the sensuality inherent in the culture in which they live or is this a stereotype? My list of favorite MR books by Latino/Latina authors are as follows.

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message 15: by Shelly (new)

Shelly (shellye77) Fiona wrote: "I think writers from Latin America are sensational at writing books based around magical realism. I wonder if it is because of the sensuality inherent in the culture in which they live or is this a..."

I would agree with that Fiona. I think it's more a part of their culture, and they are not afraid of it, whereas most Americans treat magic and folklore as not real or worthy, or even as paganistic (gosh, I hope that's a real word!). You just have to think of the Salem Witch Trials to think about what our history of anything inherently magically.


message 16: by Lisa Kay (new)

Lisa Kay (lisakayalicemaria) | 4782 comments Reading Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen and quite enjoying it. Love the apple tree with an attitude! LOL!


message 17: by Autumn (new)

Autumn   (sweetdenial) | 1625 comments thats great Lisa!! Garden spells was my accidental introduction to romance! LOL im sure u`ve read the story somewhere around this forums. I loved that book!


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