The Novella Club discussion

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Just for fun > Favorite novellas

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message 1: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
How about a thread where members talk about their favorite short novels (novellas).


message 2: by Ivan (last edited Feb 13, 2011 02:37PM) (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote - I adore this - perhaps my favorite of all-time, I've read a number of times. The entire encounter with Doc is sublime; and the prose throughout is simply stunning.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - I read this first when I was a teenager and it is one of the books that ignited my passion for reading. I found the story moving and tragic. I also recall seeing the movie (1939 version) with Burgess Meredith and Lon Chaney Jr - another masterpiece from that greatest year of Hollywood's golden era.

Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West - a prose poem. I don't usually break down while reading, but I did while reading this. I just had to set it aside too digest and appreciate one of the most exquisitely poignant scenes I ever read (the end of chapter four).

Mitz The Marmoset of Bloomsbury by Sigrid Nunez Mitz: The Marmoset of Bloomsbury by Sigrid Nunez - this was the other book about Virginia Wolfe - totally eclipsed by The Hours. Now, I'm not saying it's better than that, just different and really rather special. It evokes a time and place and has a splendid character all its own. Charming and whimsical.

The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett - I've written about this one before - obviosuly its a favorite. I love books about books and book love. This is a special treat as I am aquainted with so many of the books and authors mentioned in the text. Bennett is a passsion of mine: The Lady in the Van, The Laying On of Hands: Stories and A Life Like Other People's are all treasured additions to my library.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

I am looking forward to reading Return of the Soldier.


message 4: by Laura (new)

Laura Jeannette wrote: "I am looking forward to reading Return of the Soldier."

me too, me too.


message 5: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 76 comments Would The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham count as a Novella? - if so, this would by far be my favourite(...so far at least, but I'm sure this group could change that for me!)


message 6: by Laura (new)

Laura I have the same question concerning The Enchanted April, a lovely book in my opinion.


message 7: by Ivan (last edited Feb 25, 2011 05:23PM) (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
No. They are novels. Yes, they are short. Bowever, both run past 220+ pages. Now what truly confuses things is that some publishers over the years have issued volumes with tiny print, thus the book comes in with fewer pages; OR they use enormous print, which makes the book seem longer. Perfect example: I have an old paperback of Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Of Mice and Men 118 pages (tiny print) and a hardback Of Mice And Men 186 pages - BIG print. I would think that not more than 160 pages or so.


message 8: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 76 comments oh no! - well I'm going to have to lear about the novella then! he he

I have scanned my shelves and think that at around 120 pages The Outsider by Albert Camus fits the bill. Have wanted to read this for a while.


message 9: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
Bonjour Tristesse A Novel (P.S.) by Françoise Sagan Bonjour Tristesse by Françoise Sagan is another novella I recommend. There truly are so many.


message 10: by Laura (new)

Laura Ally wrote: "oh no! - well I'm going to have to lear about the novella then! he he

I have scanned my shelves and think that at around 120 pages The Outsider by Albert Camus fits ..."


All French editions of The Outsides have more than 180 pages.


message 11: by Laura (new)

Laura Ivan wrote: "Bonjour Tristesse A Novel (P.S.) by Françoise SaganBonjour Tristesse by Françoise Sagan is another novella I recommend. There truly are so many."

a great book indeed Ivan.


message 12: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
I thoroughly enjoyed it.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, I have read "A Christmas Carol" and I love it. I suppose I have read a few YA novellas, too. Are we sticking to adult fiction here?


message 14: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
I'll open a "topic" stream where we can nominate books for the next group read and then set up a poll for the member to decide.

I just read Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde and a number of H. G. Wells that fit this category such as: The Invisible Man and The Time Machine as well as The Island of Dr. Moreau. Even A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four by Arthur Conan Doyle qualify.

Animal Farm, The Stepford Wives, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe: and Other Stories..and so many more.


message 15: by James (new)

James Henderson (jim543) Some of my favorite novellas include A Tiger for Malgudi by R. K. Narayan, The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, Billy Budd by Melville, Anthem by Ayn Rand, and Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton.


message 16: by Ivan (last edited Feb 26, 2011 06:50AM) (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
James wrote: "Some of my favorite novellas include A Tiger for Malgudi by R. K. Narayan, The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, Billy Budd by Melville, Anthem by Ayn Rand, and Ethan Frome by Edith..."

James, please pop over and nominate one of these for the group. The Hound of the Baskervilles is a great read (I just read it in the past few months for the first time) - though a little too long. I read Ethan Frome decades ago (indeed, I read quite a bit of Edith Wharton back then) - and could re-read that easily. I've never read Billy Budd, Sailor, but I did see the film made by Sir Peter Ustinov (a true work of art) which starred Sir Peter along with Robert Ryan (brilliant) and a very young and beautiful (not handsome) Terrence Stamp. My friend Wallace raves about Sir Benjamin Brittan's opera (with a libretto by E. M. Forster no less).


message 17: by James (last edited Mar 07, 2011 08:55AM) (new)

James Henderson (jim543) I share your enjoyment of the works of Hamsun and Hunger is one of my favorites (it does seem a bit long for our group, my edition is 232pp). Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground is another great read with a similar theme.


message 18: by SarahC (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 126 comments Hi, Kari. I have still never been over the mountain to see you. It proves what a homebody I am. And I know I set that book aside to bring you and it is still sitting aside somewhere..

What can you tell us about the Pockette series. I remember Pocket books -- are they still publishing in general?


message 19: by James (last edited Mar 09, 2011 04:37PM) (new)

James Henderson (jim543) Kari wrote: "I just finished Ruth. It was a quick and light mystery novella and I enjoyed it. It was part of a Pockette series put out by Pocket books. Is anyone else familar with these book?

..."


I am not familiar with that series but Melville House is publishing a series of Novellas under the title "The Art of the Novella". There are already more than two dozen in the series including some of my favorites: The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Rasselas Prince of Abyssinia, Benito Cereno, and Michael Kohlhaas.


message 20: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
The same way. It's pyschological, but I feel as though I haven't finished if I leave stories unread.


message 21: by Tania (new)

Tania Vetter | 3 comments I'm kinda new to Novellas nut I just read The Crecian Experience by some new Author on amazon and it was awesome. Kinda sci-fi but also just a really good story about humanity as a whole. I loved it and it was only $2.99!


message 22: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I can recommend Babette's Feast. The author is more commonly known as Karen Blixen, you know the author of Out of Africa.

Here is my GR spoiler-free review: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

I just finished it. My only real complaint is that it was too short!!!!


message 23: by Toby (new)

Toby Some great ones here. My favourite (that I can't see mentioned)is The Old Man And The Sea by Hemingway.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Seize the Day--Saul Bellow
At the Mountains of Madness--H.P. Lovecraft
The Living End--Stanley Elkin
The Aspern Papers--Henry James
The Gambler--Dostoevsky


message 25: by Tina (new)

Tina Egnoski I'm new to this group. Just wanted to add a contemporary novella title: Girls in Peril by Karen Lee Boren. Great read.


message 26: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (jesstrea) Other novellas I like:

'Sonny's Blues' by James Baldwin
'Turn of the Screw' by Henry James
'Seize the Day' by Saul Bellow


message 27: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (jesstrea) My very favorite is 'Aura' by Carlos Fuentes.


message 28: by Jessica (last edited May 22, 2011 01:01PM) (new)

Jessica (jesstrea) Here are two new ones by writer-friends, both definitely worth reading:

'Insect Dreams' by Rosalind Palermo Stevens
'The Mimic's Own Voice' by Tom Williams


message 29: by Silver (new)

Silver Here are a few that I loved and are among my favorite books

The Stranger

Notes from Underground

The Little Prince


message 30: by Lois (new)

Lois (loisbennett) | 49 comments The Prisoner of Zenda (Penguin Popular Classics) by Anthony Hope

My favourite so far is The Prisoner of Zenda by Anthony Hope. I didn't think I would enjoy it at all, nevermind enjoy it so much! It really is fantastic. Has anyone else here read it? If so, what did you think?


message 31: by Ivan (new)

Ivan | 2166 comments Mod
I saw the film with Ronald Colman - quite fun, but not a faithful adaptation I fear.


message 32: by Lois (new)

Lois (loisbennett) | 49 comments I haven't seen any of the films... though I do remember an early 90s children's adaptation called "The Prisoner of Zenda, Inc."... I seem to remember it had something to do with a computer company and two young boys who looked alike (played by the same person, obviously), and one stood in for the other in something...

The novella is fantastic, though, and I look forward to reading the sequel - Rupert of Hentzau - once I've purchased it!


message 33: by Mark (new)

Mark Walsh | 11 comments I read The Prisoner of Zenda many years ago as a young man. What a fun. exciting book!


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