The World's Literature: Colombia discussion

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message 1: by Betty (last edited Feb 11, 2011 07:40PM) (new)

Betty Asma (everydayabook) | 3622 comments Asmah is a pseudonym, nom de plume. Someday, a message might arrive, saying 'I've changed the name to ...'. The name comes from a character in Tanzanian Abdulrazak Gurnah's novel Desertion, set in Zanzibar and east Africa. Reading has that affect on my imagination, to make good stories last longer after I've read them to the end.


message 2: by Marieke (new)

Marieke | 155 comments Asmah, i have wanted to read that book! do you have new names under consideration after reading around in Peru and Brazil? ;)


message 3: by Betty (last edited Feb 11, 2011 07:46PM) (new)

Betty Asma (everydayabook) | 3622 comments Marieke wrote: "Asmah, i have wanted to read that book! do you have new names under consideration after reading around in Peru and Brazil? ;)"

Obviously, I liked this story, set in a part of the world distinct from my NA perspective. With regard to your suggestion, Marieke, about Brazil-Peru, the name André cropped up somewhere during the reading for this new theme. As it's unclear where I'd read it, I'll probably not pursue it right now. Initially, 'Asmah' sounded like someone's cold, but I'm attached to it, as to my parakeets, fish, cat, and dog. But, the illustrations here change frequently like fresh paint and wallpaper.


message 4: by Natalie (new)

Natalie Hello,

I love the idea of devoting several months to a specific country and am looking forward to participating in this group. "Brazil" looks like a very interesting read, unfortunately I haven't been able to get it yet.


message 5: by Betty (last edited Feb 17, 2011 06:56AM) (new)

Betty Asma (everydayabook) | 3622 comments Natalie wrote: "Hello,

I love the idea of devoting several months to a specific country and am looking forward to participating in this group. "Brazil" looks like a very interesting read, unfortunately I haven't ..."


Hi, Natalie. I sometimes wish I could read every book, as my imagination gets carried away by the possibilities inherent in titles, covers, and passages. Towards that desire, I'm able to find what I want in the city's public and university libraries, in access to e-books, and in Google Previews. For Brazil, there's also an Illustrated Guide, as well as a Journal of Errol Lincoln Uys's months in Portugal and Brazil where he researched material for this epic. These complimentary online materials are at his website and might help you decide whether to read the novel in entirety.
http://erroluys.com/Kindle/KindleIllu...
http://erroluys.com/BrazilTheMakingof...
http://erroluys.com/BrazilTheMakingof...


message 6: by Marieke (new)

Marieke | 155 comments i forgot to come back to this thread!
i like the name Asmah, Asmah! do you think it sounds like someone sneezing or something?
:D

glad to meet you, natalie! i joined this group this past summer when Asmah was wrapping up the Greece portion. I immediately noticed that fantastic books will be read here...and i have not been disappointed in the choices. i've only been disappointed in my inability to keep up...

i'm also excited to read Brazil and i just started "A World for Julius" and i'm really really enjoying it.


message 7: by Betty (last edited Feb 17, 2011 07:37AM) (new)

Betty Asma (everydayabook) | 3622 comments Marieke wrote: "i forgot to come back to this thread!
i like the name Asmah, Asmah! do you think it sounds like someone sneezing or something?
:D

glad to meet you, natalie! i joined this group this past summer w..."


I'm looking forward to some fantastic reading for Brazil/Peru. If you get to the Brazil poll, you'll find that Agotime: Her Legend, is among the choices--both by itself and in a collection. I'd like to see how Judith I. Gleason narrates the story of African/Brazilian history now that I know Errol Lincoln Uys's narration of it.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

A nice map that suggests how much one might miss if it were not for The World's Literature and other path's to literature in translation: http://www.openculture.com/2015/06/a-...


message 9: by Betty (new)

Betty Asma (everydayabook) | 3622 comments Don wrote: "...path's to literature in translation: http://www.openculture.com/2015/06/a-..."

Definitely an alternative way to view the world's literature--from its most spoken languages. Wonderful illustration. Studying its parts denotes both languages in the circle and more languages on the bottom, linear chart. An idea for a challenge about languages instead of about countries comes out of this pictorial representation.


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